Jump to content

Comments on Reatta prices


Barney Eaton
 Share

Recommended Posts

We all know that a owner can ask any price they want for their merchandice, but what is a reasonable price? Just noticed the '90 with 30k for $15,000. In our local paper, last week there was a '89, white/red, 67k for $10,000 firm, this week another '89 white/red, 43k for $13,000 firm. I recently purchased a '90, no options, 76k for $6800. Near perfect interior, small scratches in ext paint and some panels have been repainted at some time, still think it was a decent price for the car. Where am I going? In todays market, the cars mentioned above are overpriced. <P>------------------<BR>Barney Eaton Reatta division technical advisor and keeper of the Reatta database. <P>

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I definitely agree. Anyone interested in buying should check out the Blue Book and the NADA values. You should check the wholesale price index as well. You'll see that Reattas retail are selling for 6 to 12 times what the vehicle wholesalers are giving for them. That's amazing in and of itself. If you are buying one as a collector, and they maintain this value (as they should -- especially the convertibles), you'll make money. If you are buying it to drive and maybe sell sometime down the road, don't pay too much!<P>

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Actually, I just got an 89 Reatta for $2500 with 115k about 500 miles from where I live. The funny thing is, I about leaped out of my seat when I saw how much it was; everything works fine on it except the left headlight needs a new pin and the water pump leaks, but that's easily replaceable. So now I'm the proud owner of a well-working Reatta -- the other owner wanted to know why I would drive so far for that car (he didn't know how rare these cars are)!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gotta put my 2 cents in ... Approximately 2 and a half years ago I purchased my white 1990 coupe. It had 98K on it & looked show-room shape & came with repair records. Book had been ~$10,000, I paid a mere $6500. Still running strong at 164K miles - even makes monthly trips to So Cali from Phx ...<BR> <A HREF="http://members.aol.com/gohighr/reatta.html" TARGET=_blank>http://members.aol.com/gohighr/reatta.html</A>

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Barney, I seek your advice regarding selling my Reatta. It's a 1990 Convertible,Black with tan interior and top,80K,loaded except the 16 way adjustbale seat and CD(to the best of my knowledge it has everything else that was available).The car is in great condition and has a new tan top(the shop I used researched the original top and if not identical it's the same quality and you can't tell the difference),new power antenna, new rear light outer lens (the sun faded the orginal a little). I also have a shop manual, after market 12 CD player (installed without modification to the car)and a weather proof car cover. The car is for sale in Northern Virginia and I'm asking $18,400 or reasonable offer (there's a limit on what I'll let it go for, I'll keep it first as I'm not in a must sell situation and I do like the car). Barney, I'm I in the ball park or out to lunch. <BR>

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Reply to JR... I track Reatta prices from around the country. I check Classifieds2000, AutoTrader, Old Cars, Hemmings, Reatta newsletter, and The Buick Bugle. There is a '90 convertible in Memphis with under 50k for $10,000... it may need a top and/or have other problems. A 80k convertible without CD or 16 way drivers seat would need to be in exceptional condition to warrant $18,400. The highest priced 80k,'90 convertible I have listed was $15,000 (asking price). Mileage and condition are everything. You can ask whatever you choose, but if you want to move the car, you need to be reasonable. <P>------------------<BR>Barney Eaton Reatta division technical advisor and keeper of the Reatta database. <P>

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Of course, any discussion of the "value" of any automobile is entirely dependent on whether there is a customer willing to pay the seller's price. I know there are a lot of people asking pretty lofty prices for a nice Reatta these days, but are they REALLY getting those prices? I've been trying to sell a rather nice red 89 coupe with 113K mi. for a little while now and I'm only asking $4500/obo, but I've only had one looker and two phone calls. This is with photo ads in "Trader" magazines in two major metro areas for over a month, and classifieds in two major metro newspapers. I AM in a must sell situation...with an overseas move coming up shortly...and it appears that the Reatta market suddenly got WAY soft on me! (By the way, anyone interested? mrnewco@mindspring.com) Beauty may be in the eye of the beholder but value is most definitely in the wallet of the buyer. So what if someone wants to ask over $10k for their Reatta? It doesn't necessarily mean that's the price they're going to get, and besides, it makes my situation seem all that much more ironic wink.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites

MRNEWCO:<BR>I think your asking price is reasonable and if you can hold on a while longer, you should get it. I think most people are looking for a low-mileage Reatta, which is why you're having a hard time selling. Do you drive it around with a "for sale" sign in the window? That might help. Many people have no idea what a Reatta looks like nor do they know much, if anything, about them. Do your ads include a picture? I wish you luck and hope you don't end up going cheap!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I hope that my input is not taken wrong. I don't set the price, only comment on what Reattas seem to be selling (range). Low mileage cars with all the options are selling for more than the "price guides" indicate. There seem to be lots of high mileage cars out there, and they may not be selling. There is probably a point (unknown to anyone at this time) that seperates the men from the boys.... tired cars may need lots of $$$ to make presentable or roadable. We hear stories of ABS repairs that cost $2500, add that to a $4000, 130,000 mile car and you have a car that cost more than it is worth.<BR>If I had some room, I would buy one or two cheep high mileage cars for parts. We all don't have that option, so if you have $8000 or $10,000 to spend on a car, you will probably buy the best car that your money will buy. <BR>The other thing about Reattas... not everyone knows what they are and you must find just the right person to buy one. Example, of the 5 Reattas I have owned, I have sold three, one went to Pennsylvania, one to Tennessee, and the other to south Texas, about 100 miles south of me,eventhough I live near a metropolitan area of over a million people. <P>------------------<BR>Barney Eaton Reatta division technical advisor and keeper of the Reatta database. <P>

Link to comment
Share on other sites

reatta values, check local buick dealers for trades. dealers trade these cars for next to nothing.Our latest trade was a 90 coupe with under 100k, trade value was $2500 . it will stay at the dealership reattas are in there prime to be trade vehicles, ten years old and around 100k.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

**FOR SALE** $5000 CANADIAN Fully Certified and Ontario Emissions Tested ,1988 Reatta,<BR>Pewter Gray, well maintained. Drives great, and turns many heads.<BR>For sale in Mississauga , Ontario, Canada.<BR>slightly torn steering wheel and the armrest, otherwise everything works great.<BR>This car will be sold one way or the other.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well guys, not to put a damper on the value of these beaut's (and that they are!!!), but I listened to Mr. Eaton when he advised on a '89, gray and in IMMACCULATE condition, but with circa 137K being offered at $5495 (tax, tags, gap ins., and 12/12K warranty included) and told the dealer he needed to do better. The result was I purchased a '90 w/108K in near Immaculate condition (top coat wearing in a few small spots) with same gap insurance tax, tag & 12/12K bumper to bumper warranty and all opts minus 16-way seats and CD for only $6495. I added a 6-disk Pioneer changer with remote and FM modulator for $100 and there you go.<P>These are wonderful cars, but let's not forget that those with high mileage and not in ABSOLUTE PERFECT & ORIGINAL conditon are no more likely to net full value than a BMW or Mercedes. These cars only ran to circa $32K new, so it's not reasonable to expect the same return a $50K Mercer of the same period in perfect condition would give. Even the Flagship Corvette Stingray only nets around $8-10K nowadays. Sorry if this offends anyone, but reality is reality.<BR>LOL<P>------------------<BR>D. L. Mc Crea<BR>DIGItal TECHnologies, LLC<BR>Consultants_1@Yahoo.com<p>[This message has been edited by Consultants_1 (edited 01-12-2000).]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

D.L., a restored Corvette Stingray, circa 1963-1967, brings upwards of $50,000, a return of over 1,000 percent on the original +/-$4,500 purchase price. Even one selling for $8,000 - $10,000, as you say, would be a piece of junk and still worth more than twice the original price.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Last Saturday I saw a 1989 Buick Reatta in the Washington Post for $2900. The car had only 48k original miles. I called immediately but the gentleman informed me that the ad had been in the paper since Wednesday and the car had sold 8am that same morning. The car was fully loaded, always garaged, and really only had 48k miles. It was dark blue with a matching leather interior. It goes to show you that even though most good Reattas are being priced higher, it is still possible to find one at a steal. I'm still looking.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Barney, <P>I agree with much of what you are saying and I think I have seen a great deal of evidence to suggest Reatta prices are overinflated. When I look at ads, which are only an asking price and compare them to real selling prices, such as public auctions, there's a big difference.<P>As a former Reatta owner, I bought my '90 coupe with 111K, in perfect condition, and sold it with about 125K for the same price--$3900. Why did it sell so low and why did I sell it so low? There are several reasons. <P>With over 100K miles, the financing options for most people are somewhat limited. Many banks and credit unions are still reluctant to finance older cars and/or cars with over 100K miles. Most Reattas on the market fall into one or both of these catagories. That means the cars appeal to and can only be purchased by people with significant cash on hand or very good credit resources. <P>Second, we know where the problems are, and they are not unlike most 10-year old complex cars, regardless of the make. In my case, it required a new harmonic balancer (typical of the older GM 3.8L V-6s) a new water pump and fuel pump and several minor electrical glitches. Over a period of less than tow years, these added up to nearly $2K in repair bills. Anyone following the Reatta forum for any length of time knows that these and other items are not uncommon areas needing attention. <P>Now, here is where reality meets our love for these cars--you've gotta REALLY love ANY car to pay $10K+++ for it knowing it will require these repairs in the near future. In a world of $50-65 an hour labor rates, the actual cost of owning and operating the car can be substantial.<P>The result of all of these factors is that, in real world situations, such as ebay auctions and Kruse classic car auctions, nice coupes CAN be had for $2-5K and nice convertibles CAN be had for $5-8K. <P>Anyone buying or selling a Reatta should keep their emotions and their bank account in balance when seriously considering paying or asking anything more than that. The only exceptions should be the extremely low mileage fully documented totally original car going to an owner who will probably not drive it very often and has very deep pockets to keep it in an outstanding condition.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...
Guest wally888

I must be stupid and lucky!<BR>6/98 I bought a 91 coupe for $11,500 w/40,000 k-had to buy 2 tires and new headliner. I drove it 7,000 mi. and sold it last wk. for $12,000!was mint,go figure.<BR>have 89 for sale and have varied price from $7,500 to $5,900 then $6,500,no takers( I really like the car,had a long time,is pretty maroon w/spoiler,like much better than the 91!)I turned down $5900 once)If you have a good one it kinda becomes family!<P>------------------<BR>

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just curious - I own a '90, red/white convertible Reatta. Fully loaded, 16-seat configuration, original CD, just turned 40K, new tires, excellent condition, truly driven by the proverbial little old lady (me). Three people have "hounded" me for a year about selling, and now I might be ready... Needless to say, I don't want to be shortchanged... what IS a reasonable figure?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If possible, buy low and sell high!<BR>40k cars have been advertised from $17,500 down. There was a car similar to yours in Memphis with 43K at $10,000, that car should have moved that day. If you have people twisting your arm...ASK 16 to 17, they will always be happy to give you less.... <BR>Another way of pricing it is to determine what it would cost to replace it. Check Classifieds2000 and Autotrader ads. <P>------------------<BR>Barney Eaton Reatta division technical advisor and keeper of the Reatta database. <P>

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 7 months later...

At the Kruse San Antonio auction this past weekend (22-24 Sep) there were four Reattas. One 89 and three 90's. I bought the nicest, lowest mileage '90, or at least I should say I stole it. That is because two of the other three were pretty trashed with either broken or craked leather, cracked glass, bad brakes (ABS lights on continually), VERY dirty interiors, and bad repaints. It seems the trashed cars turned potential buyers off to these cars, and drove the value of the one nice one down--a LOT!!<P>This was the first auction I had seen with that many Reattas, and, unfortunately, with several cars in very poor condition. <P>My reasons for posting this message are these: <P>1) There are opportunities out there. Of the four Reattas, Kruse only had ONE listed in their auction web site and literature. Guess the other three were late entries. Go to these auctions and be ready to buy, even if you are just there to look. These cars were abused, but not to the point of not being able to bring them back, which made them real bargains. <P>2) I think we are at the point where we have to take steps to preserve the value of the cars in great shape. If trashed out examples keep popping up, they WILL bring the value of the good ones down. Unfortunately, collectors often look at ranges. If they see that one example sold for $3-5,000 in Phoenix or Dallas or Denver, then it makes it much harder for you to get $10-13,000 for your pampered example in Houston, Chicago or Atlanta. Either the bad ones need to be brought back by real Reatta lovers or bought for parts and kept off the market. <P>What do you other owners think?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think I'll keep mine for a while longer. I bought it new and have kept it in great condition. Sooner or later, there will be less and less Reattas, and the price will bottom out and start to rise. And when it does, it will go much higher than the highs of today.<BR>Like somebody else state, it depends on whether you see them as a collector's item or not. The blue book doesn't figure on collecting, just wholesale/retail.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I paid $10,000 for my 88 in like new condition,four years old and 40K miles. I beleive I have gotten my money's worth even with all the brake prolems now. I have to tell you I would not dream of selling it for less than 10,000 @102K and probably in this area could get more. They are rare and sought after - in a good income area their price should hold up. Add to that the fact that the world is in love with the "retro" look --I think selling cheap is a mistake. <BR>

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest wally888

Interesting subject but can be approached from another angle! By the way this car is for sale.<BR> Within the last 25,000 miles I have:<BR> Window tinted $130<BR> Replaced headliner $100<BR> Replaced front struts $125<BR> Recent new battery 60<BR> Recent new alternator 160 <BR> Recent new accumulator 130<BR> Brake pads ft. and rear. 200+<BR> Car has attractive spoiler 300<BR> Radio sent away for repair 100+<BR> New brake and fuel pump relays 18<BR> Has no, nor had any, body damage but painted 3 times from pinstripe down 1200<BR> Oil changed every 3k<BR> Has 16 way seat<BR> Has orig. mats<BR> Will have both headlight w/ new rollers<BR> 3 to $4k of.......<BR> Lowered price from $7500 to reasonable offer!<BR> Lots of other receipts for repairs, etc<BR> Whats it worth?<BR> Just don't have space to keep it in.<P>

Link to comment
Share on other sites

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Jake Pflepsen:<BR><B>Last Saturday I saw a 1989 Buick Reatta in the Washington Post for $2900. The car had only 48k original miles. I called immediately but the gentleman informed me that the ad had been in the paper since Wednesday and the car had sold 8am that same morning. The car was fully loaded, always garaged, and really only had 48k miles. It was dark blue with a matching leather interior. It goes to show you that even though most good Reattas are being priced higher, it is still possible to find one at a steal. I'm still looking.</B><HR></BLOCKQUOTE><BR>I have a 1990 for sale. It is in excellent condition, new brakes front and rear, new struts, all options including sun roof. it has 80.000 miles, am asking 7000 or b/o if interested can send pictures, the car is located in NJ 1-800-841-8260

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Barney,<BR>Does a 1991 model have the potential for greater value because it was the last year made and because the brake system changed?<BR>I haver banked on that from an investment point and safety issue. Please give me your thoughts,<BR>Steve

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just finished reading all of the comments on Reatta prices and thought I'd add my two cents worth....I bought my '90 Reatta 11 months ago,in practically show room condition, fully loaded (16-seat and original CD)with 21,234 miles on it for $9,000.00<BR> Less than one month later, sitting next to another '90 Reatta at a stop light and exchanging stats, the owner offered to trade me his Reatta with 64,000 miles on it,in great shape PLUS $5,000.00 cash to boot when he heard my low mileage! <P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by whiting942@aol.com:<BR><B>Just curious - I own a '90, red/white convertible Reatta. Fully loaded, 16-seat configuration, original CD, just turned 40K, new tires, excellent condition, truly driven by the proverbial little old lady (me). Three people have "hounded" me for a year about selling, and now I might be ready... Needless to say, I don't want to be shortchanged... what IS a reasonable figure? </B><HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P>

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest jim_houston

Can't help it, but here's my $.02.<BR>If you can manage to hold on to the car<BR>until 2010 and keep it nice, I think it<BR>will be worth quite a bit of money.<BR>"Mileage" isn't what it used to be, and<BR>over the next ten years, will become<BR>even less of a factor. Cars built from<BR>1990 and beyond aren't scrap metal after<BR>100K any more.<BR>If my hunch is right, in 2010 the Reattas<BR>in nice shape will be worth $20K or more,<BR>the ones with low mileage will be $50K<BR>or better...time will tell, but I strongly<BR>feel this way about the Reatta.<BR>Great discussion.<BR>Jim Houston

Link to comment
Share on other sites

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Jake Pflepsen:<BR><B>Last Saturday I saw a 1989 Buick Reatta in the Washington Post for $2900. The car had only 48k original miles. I called immediately but the gentleman informed me that the ad had been in the paper since Wednesday and the car had sold 8am that same morning. The car was fully loaded, always garaged, and really only had 48k miles. It was dark blue with a matching leather interior. It goes to show you that even though most good Reattas are being priced higher, it is still possible to find one at a steal. I'm still looking.</B><HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P>

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can't imagine that the Reatta will ever regain its original purchase price unless inflation puts it there. What does it have going for it that the competition didn't do better? In '88-91 the imports were at their highest level of competition. A 4WS Prelude Si, twin turbo 300ZX, Subaru SVX, Supra, or T-Bird SC are already highly sought after.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Since I started this, here are some additional comments. This collector car thing is wacky. Don't buy anything because you think you will get rich from it in the future. There are examples of buying low and selling high, but like the stock market, you only hear about the exceptional trades.<P>The '91 has the reputation of being the better car to buy. Not for one particular reason but several small ones. In '91 the engine gained 5hp, the transmission went to the electronic version, the ABS was completely changed, wheels went to 16", the final drive ratio went from 2.97 to 3.33 for more performance and finally, fewer cars were built in '91. Only 1214 coupes and 305 convertibles. Small production numbers always help a car become "rare". <P>Why would we collect Buick Reattas and not some other car. It's in our genes... my garage would reject a Ford product, I have nothing against Ford or any of the other manufacturers, I go to non-GM car shows.<P>Some Reatta trivia....... There were a total of 21,731 Reattas built in four model years.<BR>Ford claims they sold 22k Mustangs on the first day they were introduced. <BR>In '55,'56 and '57 Ford built a total of 53,166. <BR>Why do Mustangs sell for 4 or 5 times their original price when so many were built? I think you will find the high priced cars are specially equipped and/or convertibles.<BR>In fact, some Mustangs sell for more than the two seat T-birds.<P>I'm not here to start an argument...just to add to the discussion. <P>------------------<BR>Barney Eaton Reatta technical advisor for BCA and keeper of the Reatta database.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is great discussion. I just have to get my 2 cents worth in. Ever hear of a Marlin? I was built in 1965-66 and 67 by Rambler. It was truly ahead of it's time. It had 4 wheel disc brakes, tilt wheel, air and V8 engine as standard equipt...although you could downsize to a large 6 cylinder engine. They didn't make many so they are very rare, but they are not worth much even today. Another good example of a rare car that is still not very valuable releatively speaking is the Edsel. Built for only a few years, kind of ahead of its time and never caught on....I think our Reattas are in a similar catagory but that doesn't keep me from loving my car and planning to keep it a very long time. Reatta is a collectors car but not an investment. Reattas are to turn heads and drive for fun! Just another opionion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just for interest's sake, I searched Autotrader.com for all Reattas for sale contrywide, and found some interestingly priced cars.<P>The first item (list sorted by price) is a '91 conv. with 16k miles for $27,500. The second, is a '90 conv. with 11k for $22k. A total of 4 cars (out of 176) were $20k+.<P>And then there were 19 more for sale above $10k, mostly convertibles with medium to high mileage, or coupes with low mileage.<P>There were also 19 for less than $4k, the cheapest being $1,750.<P>I think for the Reattas for sale out there, advertised in and on whichever medium, many owners don't realize what they have, and just as many think they have more than they actually do.<P>I bought mine about three months ago, and at the time, all I knew about Reattas was what I had read and researched on this Forum, and seen in pictures. I love extraordinary cars and things, but I did not have the money to go out and buy a Mercedes SLK, or a BMW Z3 Roadster, or even a good used mid-90's 3-series. So when I first saw a picture of a Reatta about 5 months ago (I'm new to the country, and didn't know of these cars when they were originally produced), I fell in love, instantly. The price tag was affordable (about $7k for the one in the picture), and I knew I had to own one.<P>To make a long story short (this is going somewhere), a month or so later, I found two Reattas for sale, close to each other a little north of Baltimore (I'm in DC): a black '90 with 106k for $5,100, and a silver '89 with 99k for $4,000. Both looked good in their pictures on the Internet. I drove two hours to go look at these; first the '89 and then the '90. The '89 was in great shape - clean and the same lady owner since 1992. But I wanted the black '90 - I like the color, and it was a more recent model - until I saw and drove it!<P>It had tiny scratches all over the body, it was dirty, the engine looked terrible, it had rattles all over, and error lights were coming on everywhere. I told the owner about the '89 in great condition for only $4k, but she wouldn't believe me, and went on about how rare these cars are and she wouldn't consider lowering the price. I drove back and bought the silver one for $4k (firm).<P>When I got it everything was perfect, except for the tape player, which is stuck (click, click), the driver door which doesn't unlock with the remote since the previous owner installed a remote start system, and the paint starting to peel off the front window trim. I have just replaced the MAF sensor for $600 (labor and tests incl.), and my ABS light now stays on, and I will need to fix that soon. I'm sure more things will go wrong, but I am still the happiest South African in America (my friends back home envy me after I sent them pictures), and I think I got the car at a steal.<P>BTW, I saw the same black '90 still for sale on autotrader.com, now (four months later) going for $4,500. I don't want to be mean to the seller, but this is a prime example of someone who thinks they have more than they really do.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When someone lists a Reatta with over 100k miles for sale and asking price is in the $10,000 range, I think they are dreaming. I saw a 1989 with 33k miles in the Want Ad Digest with a asking price of $7000. It is in the Albany NY area. Phone # is 518 463 4001.<P>------------------<BR>Long live the internal combustion engine!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Many Reatta owners think their cars are worth gold. Ten thousand dollars for a Reatta with 100K is dreaming. While the cars may go over 200K with little problem, from what I have seen on Ebay and the Auto Trader type sites, once a Reatta gets over 100K, no one wants it. <BR>In my area of Northern California, there was a 1989 Red Reatta in the local paper for $7850. Seemed a little high, but I called anyway. The lady said it was a wonderful car and just had the transmission replaced. The mileage: 207,000. Thanks but no thanks. In my opinion, that is a $3000 car.<P>The Reatta is becoming an old car now. There are the users, the ones that are driven everyday in rain, sleet and snow. These are ones that are wearing out and aren't worth squat. These are the cars that have 150K or more and driven so much they spend the days outdoors at work baking in the hot Texas or Florida sun and the nights outdoors, freezing in the salt encrusted crud from the New England Winter. These cars aren't worth squat.<P>Then there are the low mileage cars that are used as a secondary car and spend 99% of their time in a closed garage. Now these are the Reattas with 25K or 55K and command high prices and respect.<P>As has been said in past post, the users will wear out and provide parts for the low mileage Reattas in the future. Five years down the line, there will only be nice Reattas around. And at high prices, too.<P>Now don't get me wrong. Cars are meant to be used. And at 12K-18K miles per year a ten year old can approach 200K. But don't ask $10K for that car! The owner will have trouble selling it for $3000. So go ahead and use that car if that is your intention. But that is not your $10000 Reatta.<P>I bet this will stir up the pot, so let's hear your response.<P>Russ with '89, 85K; Russ with '89, 100K; Father with '88, 85K; Father with '90 Convt., 55K; Father with '91 Green, 17K. Father is the other BCA Reatta Technical Advisor.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Greg Ross

I offer now another observation from Canada, Nova Scotia to be more precise, in this locale I am aware of 7 Reattas including my own '88 Coupe. All but one are well maitained and none have been on the market to my knowledge in the past several years. <BR> I'll quote my stats in US $ for the benifit of the majority who participat here. Paid $4000 for mine almost three years ago with approximately 60k miles, in the interval I've driven this car an additional 100k and reinvested a mere $2900. in all and sundry maintanence including high end tires (X-Ones).<BR> I don't care where you are from or what your experience has been with pre-owned automobiles but as far as I am concerned this vehicle has been the best overall value for cost of any I've ever owned.<BR> The reality that I could sell this vehicle for next to nothing and have received such tremendous value is to me a bonus for having had the pleasure of driving to me a true Classic.<BR> Now, to set aside some mis-information, driving in this northern climate does not necessarily degrade a vehicle if properly maintained, I would be proud to park this vehicle next to any high mileage Queen on this continent. We don't have the intense ultraviolet exposure therefore the interiors don't deteriorate severely, use the proper corrosion inhibitors for year round use and keep them clean top and bottom, and above all do the routine maintanance. <BR> I wouldn't and haven't hesitated to hop in this vehicle and drive to Florida on a whim. Change the fluids often, replace a few relays whenever the mood strikes and fix it when it's broke! Works for me. I don't for the life of me know what Brenda manages to do to her Reattas, I put my foot in it whenever I am inclined, have exceeded the legal limit by a factor of .. in ideal early early morning conditions (peace officers kindly disregard)and like the Energizer Bunny.......<BR> Will I sell it, yes eventually, hopefully to someone who will care for her the way I have and get at least half the joy of owning such a fine piece of automotive history as I have.<BR> What will I ask for her, at the time whatever I believe the market will bear. I purchased this vehicle as a daily driver and have used it in that manner, in nearly three years I've only had one episode of No Go, a dead fuel pump, excellent by new car standards, extrodinary for a 13 year old car by anyones' standards, I'm certain.<BR> Now if there is a practical conversion option floating around to put a Five Speed in these E-bodies and whatever re-programming that would be necessary to make that mix work I'm game for another 100k. <p>[This message has been edited by GM Ross (edited 10-09-2000).]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Dolores

To RedReattaRuss,<P>I know it's just your opinion that used Reatta's are worthless. Well, it's my opinion as long as your car is well maintained it's worth its weight in GOLD! Apparently the users around you do not maintain their cars. The reatta is a car to enjoy not to sit in a garage unused. What's money anyway! Enjoy life while you can!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...