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intake manifold


WillBilly53
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hello all,<BR>what's the best way to clean up an intake manifold for a 322 v-8? i've already pulled it from the block. got the grease and crud off (thanks Purple Power) but it's got some surface rust and some rust inside also. is there hope for it? it's just surface rust.<P>thanks!<P>will e.<p>[ 08-03-2002: Message edited by: willbilly53 ]

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There's nuttin nicer then taking in a nasty looking intake and getting back a nice clean new-like piece. Have them sand/bead blast it too, cost isn't much more and it adds the finishing touches. Also makes it easier to paint. wink.gif" border="0 When you get it back, take a screwdriver through the ports to chuck out any large pieces of remaining carbon, mask it and paint it.. You'd be amazed at the difference a couple days makes with little work.. smile.gif" border="0

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The Vinegar solution works well, a little too well on carburator parts.. It eats away at the casting.. I'd imagine it to work well with hard metals, but I'd test a spot before I'd tank it. It does work well tho on the carb bases which are aluminum and cast iron depending on carb.<P>Keep in mind that once you tank something, don't forget it's there and when your done with the vineger, toss it. Stuff will grow inside the tank if left to long.<P>my 2cents from my experiance

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Chemical stripping, or "dipping" also works extremely well--better even than hot tanking at a machine shop. Check the yellow pages. Chemical stripping gets inside everything, and requires no clean up or sand blasting after. I'm a big fan of it!<BR>Check the yellow pages.<BR>-Brad

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thanks for the replies!<P>yesterday i found an old post asking the same question right after i posted my message. someone suggested soaking the intake in white vinegar overnight. i have to say i went out and bought a few gallons of piggly wiggly white vinegar and this morning i looked in the bucket i had it soaking in and it looks beautiful! just flat out beautiful cast iron. someone also suggested soaking in a mixture of 20% molasses and 80% water. i haven't tried this. <P>one last question. does this only work on cast iron? or does it work on steel as well? <P>thanks!<P>will

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That's AWESOME!!!!<BR>I know why the vinegar works--it's acid. You're doing at-home acid dipping.<BR>Why does the molasses solution work? The jar we have in the kitchen says it's cane sugar--sugar isn't an acid---but it might be a strong base? That doesn't seem right either, though.<BR>Anybody out there know Bill Nye, the Science Guy?<P>Also, if you got a 5-gallon bucket at Home Depot, and got a lid with the rubber seal in it, would the vinegar keep?<P>-Brad

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I have done the molasses thing - it works very well.<P>Downside:<P>Washing the molasses / water solution and resultant black crud off the parts before you treat them is problematic. You can't really get all of it off without using water, and at that point you are already starting the rusting process over. If you don't coat with WD-40 immediately, you will see rust within 30 minutes. Once you WD-40 though, the part will be good for a few days before you soak it in some solvent or something before further treatment (painting, blackening, etc.)<P>By that time, you would have been better off beadblasting.<P>Also, the solution smells remarkably like vomit.<P>Upside:<P>Cleans rust from the parts VERY well. No pits or anything from blasting.<P>Cleans areas that would be otherwise inaccessible with blasting (inside manifolds, water jackets, etc.)<P>Biodegradable (as mentioned above)<P>A cheap, safe method if you do not have access to abrasive blasting equipment.<P>Mark

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Brad,<P>The 20% molasses 80% water solution actually begins to ferment after it is left out for a few days (uncovered).<P>I think that the process actually somehow consumes the iron oxide, actually "eating" it away, using it as energy for the fermentation process! <P>It works very quickly once started. You will know the process is happening once the bubbly froth start to gather on the top surface (still no parts in the solution at this point). It actually starts to smell like beer.<P>Try this: after you put your parts in (I used a stainless steel collander from Wal Mart as a basket), sort of stir and pop all the bubbles away to get rid of the froth. Come back 30 minutes later, and you will see that bubbles have started to rise to the top to form an outline in the shape of your part!<P>I think what happens is the rust is eaten from the surface, and the residual gas sort of slides on the surface until it reaches the highest point, at which time it leaves and floats to the surface.<P>For example, if you drop a rusted nut in there, you will begin to see bubbles lined up in a hexagonal shape.<P>Pretty interesting, I know. Oh yeah, this is the point at which it starts to smell like puke.<P>Have fun!<P>Mark

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thanks bill,<P>oh and just to warn others. be careful with the vinegar idea. i just soaked my fan in it and the back side part in the center where the bolts go through was completely disintegrated. <P><BR>anybody have any ideas on how to treat the inside of an intake to keep from rusting?<P><BR>thanks,<P>will e.

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