Jump to content

Electric Fuel Pump


Guest Ray Newport
 Share

Recommended Posts

Guest Ray Newport

Looking for a good electric fuel pump as a backup for my mechancial pump on my 49 Roadmaster. Anyone knows who makes a good one? Thanks in advance. smile.gif" border="0

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest scott mich bca # 6619

I use a rotary pump from Napa. It is mounted in series before the original pump.<P>Mount a filter before it, and a regulator after it.<P>Just turn it on when you need to.<P>Scott<P>P.S. Make sure it is a 6 volt one!<p>[ 07-18-2002: Message edited by: scott mich bca # 6619 ]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just a suggestion here....mount the electric pump in parallel to the original pump with shutoff valves in front and behind each pump. Despite the fact there are 1 way (in dir'n of flow of course) valves in the original pump, if you're operating the electric in series with the mechanical pump, its putting additional "not design intended" pressure on the mechanical pump from behind...this could lead to the mechanical pump developing leaks. Additionally, if you run both, the original pump was not designed to pull flow through another pump in the circuit. Truthfully, I would set it up such that the original mechanical pump is the main one....and run the electric in case of mechanical failure in parallel with the mechanical.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest scott mich bca # 6619

Mr Buicknut,<P>You do bring up some valid points. About pulling throught the electric pump, when it is in series. <P>I understand that the electric rotary pump was also designed to be put in series, and pulled through.<P>One of the advantages of having the electric in series, is that if you have a vapor lock, you simply flip the switch on the electric for a few seconds, and then turn it off, and you are on your way.<P>Having it in parallel with the valves, means you have to stop the car, get out and go under the car to engauge the electric pump.<P>Can it be run in parallel without the use of valves?<P>In the series installation even if the original pump fails or leaks, you can always with a rubber line, bypass the original pump, and go from the steel line on the front crossmember to the steel line to the carburetor.<P>I do agree, the parallel installation theoreticaly would be better, but I feel the series one is more practical.<P>Scott<BR>1955 Buick Roadmaster 76-C Convertible<BR>1959 Olds SS-88 Flat top hardtop<BR>1960 Corvair Model 700 Deluxe, 4 dr 3 speed<BR>1986 Buick Century<BR>1978 Pontiac Bonneville Bougham<BR>& a few others<p>[ 07-19-2002: Message edited by: scott mich bca # 6619 ]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Ray Newport

Where is the best place to put the pump? Near fuel tank or somewhere in the engine compartment? Will wait to see which is best in placement of pump, series or parallel. Thanks to all for the help.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Near the tank is the recommended site. I bought a generic GM Delco pump at Carquest. In my case, I always switch it on for a minute before cranking the engine. Sure cured the slow starting problem. <P>Be aware that the pump can be very noisy, and that you need to mount it securely in rubber to dampen the noise.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest scott mich bca # 6619

I don't know where is proper, however I mounted mine in the outer frame rail, just about midway from the front to the back of the car. <P>Mine is runs quietly. Yes you do want to mount it with the rubber insulators.<P>I just cut out about 10" of the steel line, and put a clear filter, the pump, and then the regulator all in series. Nice and neat.<P>Put an extra toggle swithc under the dash, hardly noticable.<P>Scott

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm glad to see there are other ideas floating about with this problem. However, my points are made on some valid history. My dad rebuilds and sells the old mechanical fuel pumps for the past 20 years - and this issue has come up with him on occasion by his customers. He has found on too many numerous occasions, that when a customer has put an electric fuel pump in series with the mechanical - the mechanical pumps have more often than not, failed and leaked or the car performance has been degraded...despite being carefully rebuilt with new valves and modern diaphram materials. When they have either removed the electric fuel pump from the fuel line, or put them in parallel - the problem no longer exists. I do agree that it would be logical to put it inf front of the mechanical pump to help alleviate vapor lock - but I think a more liveable approach would be to try and eliminate the cause of the vapor lock in the first place (...I know - its not an easy task...but keep in mind these vehicles were used on a daily basis in their day, and I know from personal experience in the late 70's of driving my '49 on a daily basis back in High School and back and forth to my job - if everything works and is up to maintence - its not anything more than an annoying, once in a while occurance....). I'm not saying its guaranteed to leak or perform worse if its in series, but from my dad's experience - it increases the chances of ruining the mechanical pump - or decreasing its performance level and causing your car to run with less pep. Just my opinion and learning over time for this young pup to have finally learned to listen to his dad.... ! grin.gif" border="0 Good luck which ever path you choose grasshopper cool.gif" border="0

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest 53and61

I mounted a NAPA rotary pump (made by Carter, I believe) with the supplied rubber cushion on a rear frame rail near the tank. It's inaudible inside the car, but I think I'd hear it if it were mounted on a body panel such as the floor pan. Power comes through diodes from the start and run terminals on the ignition switch, so no additional switch is necessary. No more plop-plop-plop sound from the mechanical pump, and no more torture to the starter motor when the carb is dry after sitting for a couple of weeks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

BuickNut, <P>The best possible mechanical pump would not, by itself, address the case of starting a car that only was used every two or three weeks. In this case, you have to crank and crank to get the fuel pump to prime the dry carburetor.<P>A standard electric pump eliminates this problem. By switching it on prior to cranking, then car will start at once, saving the wear on the cylinders, starter, and battery. In my case, I then switch it off. Mine pushes the fuel, in series, through the mechanical pump at low pressure. This was recommended in the popular "Classic Car Restorer's Handbook".<P>I think part of the discussion needs to be with what type of problem you want to solve.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest scott mich bca # 6619

Buick Nut,<P>Your points are well taken. This could explain why after I have put a freshly rebuilt mecahnical pump on, I still have vapor lock symtoms.<P>I still do not know if it is really vapor lock or a weak mechanical pump.<P>It is intermittent, but when it does occur, it is usually after I have stopped and rested the car for a bit, or during hot weather.<P>Scott

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yellow Lark,<P>Good point...after all, in their day, the cars didn't typically sit around for sometimes weeks between starts needing all that cranking because the pump/carb became dry. I guess its sometimes a trade-off between which do you want to replace due to overwork - the starter from cranking to get the pump primed, or the pump which may (again, not always a problem..) suffer from the electric pump pushing against it. Sort of like using the clutch to help slow the car because you wanna save the brake pads....but you wind up wearing extra on the clutch and have to replace it sooner - but you have brake pads/shoes lasting longer.....ah, its a still a fun circle though, isn't it ? grin.gif" border="0

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Mr. Solutions

Can you guys that have fitted an electrical pump please supply us "have-nots" with Brands & Model Numbers so we can investigate.<P>Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

QUESTION!! Just so I don't remove the fuel<BR>pump on my 56 without good reason, What are<BR>the symptons of "vapor lock". I got my<BR>girl on the road the other day first time<BR>and it ran beautiful. Pulled back into driveway and shut her down and checked things out. Started her up again got about<BR>3 blocks and she stopped period. Will run<BR>as long as I pour fuel into carb but wont<BR>pull fuel via fuel pump. Leathers gone in fuel pump???? Thanks Loren

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...