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Pertronix Adjustment Question


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I am installing a Pertronix Ignitor 2 <BR>in my 64'Riviera and have a question<BR>concerning the gap adjustment between<BR>the magnet ring and the module itself.<BR>I maybe a little thick but but the <BR>instructions seem a little cloudy.<BR>With the shaft pulled down, I rotate<BR>the magnet/rotor assembly and see<BR>both the low and high spots as they<BR>pass over the module. Is this where I<BR>take the measurements? What about the<BR>small nib in the corner of the module?<BR>The magnet ring passes over it but<BR>does not appear to rub against it even<BR>though I can't see light through it on the<BR>low side. Thanks for any help with this.

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Setting the gap on it is fairly easy.. Take the low point when the shaft is down and measure from the magnet ring to the highside (outside edge) of the ignitor module. Take the high side when the shaft is up and measure from the low side (inside edge) of the ignitor. The ignitor itself sits at an angle on the mounting plate so I use the angle when I adjusted mine because it prettymuch represents real high and low side tollerances. Make sure you also shim the distrib if needed, don't want to much endplay. Keep everything within the Min and Max tollerance levels shown on the instruction paper and you'll be all set. Also if the magnet ring isn't prettymuch straight all the way around, make sure you add a washer to one of the screw on it to level it up.. I hope you also got the Flamethrower II unit as well. :-) One last thing, if you have a resistor style wire running to the coil, then either bypass it (run parallel wire) or replace it alltogether. Pertronix stuff likes 12v, even tho they say "it'll work with the resistance", don't believe them.. grin.gif" border="0<P>Now register! tongue.gif" border="0 <P>Scott

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With regard to a Petronix system, it has been suggested that I switch over my '56 Packard to that system. Why? What benefits would I see by going electronic?

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No Points!!!! #1 Reason right there.. grin.gif" border="0<P>No having to always buy new and keep them adjusted, no point floating, smooth power from start to finish, more power vs point imo also. they claim better mpg also, which is probably true as I did the switch and added a K&N filter at the same time and went from 10mpg to 15mpg... I'm sure others will jump in here and offer either similar advice and reasons or will differ completly. To each his own...<P>Scott

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Some observations of the Petronix I put in one of my 55's 3 years ago: smoother idle, better throttle response, better mileage (1.5-2mpg better), longer plug life (checked plugs at 12,000 miles and they still look like new)<BR>A friend told of his company installing Petronix in 30 warehouse forklifts and how they all failed in a year. They were originally installed with no resistance in the circuit...replacements have ballast resistors and have not failed in 3 years. My conclusion after talking to Petronix is use resistance if you do a lot of idling and low speed driving like parades; go straight 12V if most of your driving is on the highway. Mine is running on straight 12V.<BR>Willie

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