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what is a T-25047 wrench?


WillBilly53
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anybody know? my shop manual calls for it to remove the thermostat cover.<BR>the "nut" is threaded on the outside?!<BR>it looks like an allen wrench might fit in there, but i don't know. how long have allen wrenches been around?<P>i'm confused.<BR>please help?<P>thanks in advance!<P>will e.

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The "T-" number is the identification number of a particular "special tool" for that operation. GM's special tools were made by Kent-Moore, but that company's now called SPX. That special tool can be ordered from them, if you desire. The "T-" number will not cross into anyone else's tool numbers or be listed as such in the other tool catalogs. Snap-On, Matco, and others might have similar tools as that particular SPX tool, but you have know how to contact those tool companies' local represtatives to get one, if they have one.<P>Clymer auto manuals typically will detail what more common tools to use to take the place of the particular factory special tools. I'm not sure if they will do that in your case.<P>"Allen wrenches"? They've been around for ages. They are used with a bolt head that has an internal hex (recessed) and a round outer "head" surface, instead of the more traditional outer hex surface and flat head. Then there are also "torx" head bolts/studs (probably what is on your vehicle, as they look similar to allen bolts/studs but are more star shaped with sharp points).<P>This could well be a situation where that repair might be best given to those who "have been there before" . . .<P>Enjoy!<BR>NTX5467

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thanks tom,<BR>i guess it's true, no question is a stupid question unless you already know it. and i'm new to this so i don't know much!<P>ntx,<BR>i can't seemed to find out where to order these specialty tools or is there a chart that shows a compatible tool for that model number. <P>Brad,<BR>thanks. i got the artwork off of amazon.com. i just right click on the image and click properties. then copy the url. hot rod rumble is a movie. but this artwork is from a soundtrack. i haven't seen the movie on amazon for some reason. i'm hoping they will release it on DVD. Oldtimer gave me some other movies that are good as well "Hot Rod Girl" and "the fast and the furious"(1954) you can buy both of these on DVD together for like 14.97. i'm gettin gready to order mine.<P>[ 05-28-2002: Message edited by: willbilly53 ]<p>[ 05-28-2002: Message edited by: willbilly53 ]

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Will--I absolutely LOVE the art at the bottom of your posts! What is it, and where did it come from?<P>NTX5467--<BR>Please tell me more about the specialty tools. I'm especially interested for a number of reasons, the biggest being that I love tools and don't need much of an excuse to buy another one, the second being that I work for Super Rod magazine and am starting a monthly section on tools. This would make a fantastic article, but I need a little more info. For instance, how far back in model year can you generally order a tool? Heck, even "what's a good phone number for me to get in touch with SPX?" would be good. I'd be extremely interested in finding more info on this. I can think of several tools for my '54 Buick that I can't just get down at Sears. Is it just simple hand tools, or did they do the more elaborate ones such as the driveshaft/pinion gear pullers for the torque-tube cars? And would that tool be available?<BR>Please e-mail me directly at:<BR>brad.ocock@verizon.net and I'll call you on my dime and get some more info about this.<BR>Thanks a ton,<BR>-Brad

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All the K-M tools I've ever seen had a J prefix. Burroughs Tool also made some of GM's special tools and were identified by BT prefix.<P>I have Kent-Moore catalogs listing the specialty tools all the way back to early 1950s for every make they supplied and I cannot find T-25047.<P>There was a fellow in Tennessee who had a stock of older K-M and Burroughs GM tools a few years back but I'll have to dig thru my files to find his name- think it was Bill Sawrey.

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Go to the <A HREF="http://www.spx.com" TARGET=_blank>www.spx.com</A> website. On the right hand side will be a large list of "business units" of SPX. There, you'll find the Kent-Moore name listed. In their pre-SPX days, Kent-Moore was the dedicated supplier who GM dealers obtained their special tools from. When clicking on that name, it takes you to the Kent-Moore site (which I believe the URL is <A HREF="http://www.spxkentmoore.com)." TARGET=_blank>www.spxkentmoore.com).</A> When that page comes up, it has the contact numbers for Kent-Moore.<P>There are also listings in that business unit list for OTC and Dealer Equipment. Dealer Equipment was the complimentary part of Kent-Moore that had things like systems testers, lifts, and other machines the dealer might need in the repair shop area (which could also be part of the GM Dealer Equipment program).<P>Also, there is a listing there for Miller Special Tools. Clicking on that name brings up a similar page to the Kent-Moore page. I suspect that Miller Special Tools is the later day varation of the previous Miller Falls Tools that was the special tool supplier for Chrysler Corporation, just as Kent-Moore was for GM.<P>Neither of those pages has links to an onlilne catalog, but they do have contact phone numbers.<P>In earlier times, the GM dealers had the option of buying the special tools "as desired/needed" or being part of an "automatic ship" program where any essential tools were automatically shipped to the dealerships (and invoiced to them too) as the GM program dictated. End result was that many dealerships ended up with things they'd probably never use, but had to buy as part of the program along with the tools they used frequently.<P>Also, if for example, a Chevy dealer wanted to be authorized to work on and sell a ZR-1 Corvette, they had to buy a set of special tools specific to that vehicle. Otherwise, it was tow truck time.<P>If you look through the Kent-Moore/SPX catalog, you'll see many tools that are generic or common tools, but with their name and part number on them.<P>Similar in some cases with the earlier Chrysler tools and diagnostic equipment. <P>From the Kent-Moore SPX catalogs I've seen, most of the tools are of more recent vintage and application rather than the earlier things. They are, or at least seem to me, somewhat pricey and are typically out of the realm of an individual or small repair shop. For example, the tool to remove the knockouts from ignition keys was about $50.00 and looked like it cost all of about $5.00 to make. Definitely not in the same price range as Cal-Van tools, for example.<P>Snap-On, Matco, and other tool companies that cater to the repair shop trade on a territorial sales basis, might have similar tools to the Kent-Moore tools, but you'll have to know what you're looking for to find them in their catalogs. To me, the key would be to know what tools you needed to get from Kent-Moore/SPX and what you could get from other, more localized sources, instead of just ordering things from Kent-Moore/SPX indiscriminately. Let your pocket book be your guide.<P>I'm not sure if Kent-Moore/SPX is set up to do business with individuals or not, but the contact information on the webpage could probably get an answer to that. If they take credit cards, it might not matter anyway.<P>Kent-Moore/SPX tools will be availabe only from them. Snap-On and others have individual territorial sales reps that call on the repair shops and dealership technicians in their respective "tool trucks" and can be found on a local basis (local contacts can be obtained from your local mechanics/technicians).<P>As I mentioned, the Clymer manuals have made various tool combinations of common tools to take the place of some of the factory tools in certain repair situations. Typically, though, having the factory spec tool makes some repairs go much better with a higher degree of quality that would take longer to get without them, provided the special tool isn't just a generic tool with their name stamped into it (i.e., gear puller).<P>Hope this information might clarify some things on this subject. <P>Like to see your cable tv shows, Brad! Some great information there too!<P>Enjoy!<BR>NTX5467

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Back to the question of what that special tool is, there might be a picture of it in the GM/Buick factory service manual for that particular vehicle, demonstrating how to perform the particular repair. Otherwise, you'd have to find a catalog from Kent-Moore/SPX that would have it illustrated in it, plus mention what types of repairs it was designed for on which vehicles. <P>You might check with your local GM/Buick service department manager to see of he has a reasonably current Kent-Moore/SPX catalog you can look at. If that tool's in there, the mystery will be solved, but if not then you might need to call or fax the numbers on the Kent-Moore web page mentioned above, seeking pricing/availability/applications.<P>Enjoy!<BR>NTX5467

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