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29 Chrysler Model 65


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I believe the car has a dead short in the distributor. The engine will crank but not fire. There is good fuel to carburator. I know the distributor and sparkplug wires are bad and need replacement. However,a live wire from the coil/ignition switch to the distributor does not open or close the points. The condenser wire to the distributor looks insulated by a rubber washer. If the points are bad, does anyone have specs for replacement points, and a wiring diagram from/to the coil/ignition switch? The car ran last year before I put it away for the winter. Thanks.

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First thing I'd recommend doing is to pull the distributor cap and look at the points. Do they have a white or gray powdery look to them? If so it is likely they are corroded. This is the most common problem I've had with a car sitting and then not having spark. You can use some fine emory cloth, or if you have one a point file to clean the contacts. If you have to file much you may need to readjust the points when done, however cleaning should let you get spark even if the points are out a little bit. It is also possible that the condensor may have developed a short, or that the coil has gone bad, though these are far less likely.

Other things to test for are 6 volts (negative) at the negative terminal of the coil with regards to ground (assuming the car is still it's original 6 volt positive ground system). If you are not getting 6 volts to the negative coil terminal then you have an issue with either the wiring or your ignition switch.

You can check for power to the coil by turning your engine over until the points are visibly closed. Hook up either a multimeter (volt meter) or test light across the terminals of the coil. You should read 6 volts, or the light should glow. If you are getting power to the coil and the ground through the points is good, then it is likely your coil is not good.

You can check the points if you have a multimeter by again making sure the points are closed by turning the engine over until the lobe is not against the points. At this point you should get a zero, or near zero reading between the points and ground. If it reads much more than a couple of ohms you most likely have a corrosion issue either with the points, or with connections somewhere in the wiring system.

I'm sure there are many other things to check as well, and there are actual experts floating around the forums that can provide greater insights.

Hope this helps, I have a Chrysler 77 and have had the corroded points issue when the car sat for a couple of months. Florida is harsh on electrics.

Rich

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One other question, does your car have the armored cable from the distributor to the ignition switch? I believe the 65 originally had an electrolock armored switch assembly between the ignition switch and the coil. If so let me know, I believe I have the wiring diagram for the 65, I will double check when I get in this evening. The wiring diagram for my Chrysler 77, which is likely similar can be found at:

http://www.1930chrysler77.com/wiring.htm

Rich

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