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1914-1923 Dodge speedometer


HBergh
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Hi everyone: As I view the dashboards of the early Dodge models

(1914-1923) I see two different styles of speedometers. One is like a

clock face with a center mounted pointing needle. The other has a small opening

with the speed numbers printed on a cylindrical strip that moves as the speed changes. Can anyone tell me when or where these two types of speedometers were used? Did it depend on the car model or was one a non-standard model?

Thanks, Howard

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Howard,

There were MANY different speedo's used from '14 to '28. You are correct,however, in your observation that the first designs were 'clock style', even given the various different types thereof. The rotary drum type North East speedometer was introduced in July of '23 at S/N 929894 with the 116"wb. I hope this helps.

Rodger "Dodger" Hartley

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Hi:

The speedometer with the clock style were made by Mansfield until July 1923 the other were made by North East up to the 128 Model after that you will have to ask JB.

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Howard,

Closer inspection of the 9th edition Master Parts book shows the N/E model E speedometer was introduced earlier than I previously stated. It shows car # 740182 (July '22). This would be what is referred to as the '23 style body. Confirmation of that in the North East Instruction manual shows the N/E model E type 3850 (MPH) and the N/E model E type 3855 (metric) was introduced in "Early '22". Note the early 3850's had a printed face plate whereas the later ('25?) had embossed face plates. Not sure what the 'Mansfield' refers to?

Rodger "Dodger" Hartley

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Rodger: Thanks for the follow-up. I reviewed my copy of the 1914-1933 Dodge Master Parts List to see if I could understand how you derived your information. The only reference to car #740182 in my book dealt with the speedometer gear support (pg D21-22). Does the gear support point to a North East speedometer? Does this mean that cars between #740182-929894 used the rotary drum type of speedometer? Thanks again, Howard

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Howard,

Yes, it would seem so. As I said, the 9th ed master parts book ('27), and the N/E service manual ('26) both confirm. I also have that '34 parts book, but remember much of the 'early stuff' is convienently omitted in later issues. That is why one must check several sources and cross reference for accurate info.

Rodger "Dodger" Hartley

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  • 17 years later...

This post almost qualifies for the Social Security roles (2004), but still is relevant to a problem I’m having with the speedometer in my 1923 DB Roadster. Without repeating myself and making a redundant post more redundant, I’ll again ask why the dilemma created when discovering the transmission drive gear spins in the opposite direction the speedometer operates, and the speedometer tries to work in reverse, hasn’t been resolved since it surely began in the mid 1920’s?

I talk regularly(personally) to Roger (Dodger) Hartley, and he still has no answer to what I should do short of seeking out a replacement speedometer……but, apparently, nobody knows what a acceptable replacement is. Several different brands and models of speedometers is mentioned, by only the Stewart-Warner and North East Electric Company drum type speedometers seem to be available. 
Can anyone help here, and maybe put this problem to sleep after nearly a century of unrest?

Edited by Jack Bennett (see edit history)
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The early DB car speedometers were Johns Manville Left Hand rotation, very early were white face then changed to black faced. Perhaps this is the “Mansfield referred to?

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Sounds like you have you answer ight there. Earlier were left hand (counterclockwise, as the person sitting in the dive seat views it) while later were clockwise. So if you try to use a later speedometer with a transmission drive gear meant for the earlier left=hand drive it will be a mismatch.

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Absolutely right Mike, the early gearbox had the lever for gears and brake at the rear of the box, the later cars at the front. The early speedos were clock face (DB were Marked “LH”) and later drum. The drive at the gearbox also varied in length as development went on. Some stuff you can mix and match and some stuff you cannot. 
Jack, both the white and black face speedos come up on ebay from time to time, are not cheap and are not usually sold working. I have a black face spare for my 19 tourer and a white face spare for my 17 Roadster both left hand. 
Please be aware that not all are the same the DB was LH the ford was RH.

 

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