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Kill/bypass switch


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I was talking with a mechanic friend the other day, and we were discussing taking our cars out of storage within the next few months. I mentioned that mine has been in storage since October, and I never start it. He advised that the bearings in the turbo will suffer damage on startup and suggested installing a kill switch or some type between the battery and the coil in order to build oil pressure and lubricate the bearings before starting the car to avoid bearing damage. I'm using Mobil 1, 0-40. Do I need to be concerned? If so, where could I insert the switch? Any suggestions would be appreciated.

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Dave,

Hi, I'm in Andover, MA and am tinkering with a new TC. My above advice should allow you to get the oil flowing and lubricate all necessary parts. As long as your battery isn't too flat, you could spin the engine for a minute of so, but don't do it in intervals longer than 7 or 8 seconds (not good for the starter).

I picked up my TC in January and have been playing with it a little. My email is rdurbeck@yahoo.com if you want to discuss the TC and its issues. Godo luck with the lubrication of the turbo.

Rich

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David,

Remember if you are cranking the engine, unburned fuel is entering the cylinders and "washing" off the oil on the walls of the cylinders. If you intend on cranking without spark, you should crank without fuel also. Your synthetic oil should protect your car just fine. When storing your car, always remember to use STA-BIL or a product like it, to prevent the gasoline from turning to varnish.

Larry

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Thanks for the infoprmation, Larry. And that's a good point I failed to consider... fuel dilution in the cylinders. I did put Sta-Bil in the tank and filled it to the top before storing it. The other suggestion abut removing the coil wire unfortunately is not a suitable option as this is the Maserati engine, and the coil is under and behind the intercooler, and not really accessible without removing some parts. I'll likely just remove the four individual spark plug wires. Have you had, or do you know, anyone that has had any experience with the new Iridium spark plugs? Denso or NGK?

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By all means Jeff, jump in. BTW, Packard or not, the oil in the plug hole is exactly how

I do the sart up routine after a long period of inactivity on any turbo Chrysler. I leave the

plugs out as well, the motor will spin much faster, work the starter less, and build oil pressure

much more quickly.

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