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Guest Mr. Solutions
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Guest Mr. Solutions

Hi<P>I'm **very** new to the world of Buick's, in particular the rebuilding / restoring scene. As an example of how new, lets suffice to say I bought a '51 Model 4369D on a whim.<P>My first questions, borne out of necessity, are: (Modern-day equivalents)<BR>- what fluid can I use to top up the shocks in my car? My shop manual states "GM or Delco Shock Absorber Fluid"<BR>- what fluid can I use to top up the Dynaflow transmission? My shop manual states 'GM Hydra-Matic Drive fluid' or 'Automatic Transmisiion Fuid Type A - AQ-ATF'<P>That's it for the time being...<BR>Thanks<BR>Johan

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Greetings and welcome to the Buick part of the vintage vehicle hobby!<P>The current DEXRON III specification automatic transmission fluid will, according to GM, backdate to 1947 and the first modern-style automatic transmission from HydraMatic. The GM-produced fluid you get at the dealer is the only way you can be sure of that what you get meets the GM standards (as written) in all respects. You can still find Type A fluid in some cases, but it will most likely be an "off brand" fluid of questionable composition.<P>As for the shock oil, you might check with some of the motorcycle shops for "fork oil". Back in the 1980s, a lady brought her Peugot sedan into the dealer that sold her the car when new. She priced struts for it and had severe sticker shock. An alignment shop familiar with those cars knew that you could change the oil in the struts, so he went to the motorcycle shop and got some fork oil of a particular viscosity to put in the struts. The greater the viscosity, the stiffer the ride will be, as he related. If you can determine the viscosity of the existing oil in your shocks (or the GM specification), it might ease your shopping for the correct fork oil. <P>You might check with the BCA tech advisors to see if they have some recommendations also. They are listed on the front page of the BCA website.<P>Otherwise, current lubricants are much superior to what was around when your vehicle was produced. Even today's worst ones are probably better than the premium lubricants of that earlier time.<P>"Happy Motoring!"<BR>NTX5467

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