Jump to content

Cleaning up exhaust manifolds???


Pat Baysinger
 Share

Recommended Posts

I have tried both bead blasting and chemical strip on exhaust manifolds. I prefer the bead blast method. The chemical strip can loosen any plugs in the manifolds. I prefer the blasted ones because they have a more even finish. Eastwood and POR-15 among others sell manifold paint. They have a cast color that looks pretty good. The paint will last a few years and is relatively easy to touch up. I like POR-15 because it can be cured on the car. The Eastwood that I used had to be baked in an oven. It puts out a strong smell and will not please your spouse.<P>Although I've never tried this myself, I've seen some very nice manifolds that were ceramic coated. Check Hemmings for vendors. The nice thing about this process is that you can have it done inside and out. This may even improve horsepower.<P>These are my thoughts and how I plan to spruce up my 62 Electra convertible this winter.<p>[ 11-28-2001: Message edited by: Jerry Acheson ]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dont sandblast the intake or exaust manifold. It's too course and you may have trouble getting them to mate with the block again. (leaks) Glass bead them.<P>Ceramic coating is good suggestion as the exaust would aways look new. I would't chrome the intake as It's too difficult to shoot the chrome in the recessed areas therefore showing nickel blows.<P>Peter de Jong<p>[ 11-28-2001: Message edited by: Peter de Jong ]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Skyking

I sandblasted my exhaust manifolds and coated them with Eastwoods cast coating. I gave them two coats and cured them on the car. As long as you run the engine for 20 minutes straight, they will be fine. Mine are going on two years now and they still look new............. cool.gif" border="0

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've had exhaust manifolds chemically stripped, and I've also cleaned them up with a course wire cup on a right angle electric grinder. If you're looking to do it in an afternoon, the electric grinder is a good way to go, but the chemical stripping is really the most thorough--cleans inside and out, and you won't look like you spent the day in a chimney.<BR>Don't sand blast them--it removes metal from rust pits, making them bigger. I personally think glass beading also does that, at least a little bit. You won't lose casting numbers, etc. with the chem strip.<BR>For coating, the POR-15 is real good, and ceramic coating would be the best, but it's usually pricey.<BR>Another tip would be to have the mating surface of the manifold decked perfectly flat by an engine machine shop, and the same for the heads if they're off the car. This allows you to put them back on with no gaskets--the factory didn't use manifold gaskets, there's no reason you should have to. Just smooth and square the mating surfaces.<BR>-Brad

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest scott mich bca # 6619

I've sandblasted two different cars so far.<BR>Both my '53 & '55.<P>The still look great. One is three years old, the other two.<P>Have the manifold re-surfaced before you blast it. Then just don't blast the mating surface.<P>You are not finished after you sandblast.<BR>The next step is to use a bench grinder with a wire wheel brush, and then the same in a drill.<P>Finish it off with steel wool. Clean it up wearing gloves with laquer thinner.<P>Use the POR paint and bake it either in the oven, or BBQ grill at 300^ for apporx 1/2 hr.<P>Cover the grill or oven with tin foil first, and make sure your spouse is not around!<P>It's all in the preparation.<P>Scott Mich BCA # 6619<BR>Assistant Director<BR>Chicagoland Chapter<BR>1955-76C<BR>1959 Olds SS-88

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have had excellent results using a product call Calyx (513-923-1154). You see it advertised in many car magazines. It is like a paste that you can apply with your fingers or a toothbrush after bead blasting your manifolds. The color looks factory. After you apply it you have a few months until you have to start up the engine to heat up the manfolds and cure it. It will last a couple of years with little wear and then all it takes is a few minutes to re-apply it and you are set for a few more years.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Skyking

Pat, don't go crazy with this. Do like Yellowlark & myself said. By the time the manifolds start to look bad again, the whole engine compartment will look bad again..........

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...