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Bodywork & Interior question


bigredbuick
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I'm having some work done on the raingutter under the back of my convertible top, and it looks like I have a good opportunity to get more aggressive with bodywork overall on this car. A couple questions;<P>Where am I going to SEE the difference in $2000 worth of bodywork and $4000? I have some rust repairs that are going to be made and I'm wondering if some of that price will translate into longevity of rust repair?<P>Also, my instrument panel/dashboard has seen its share of weather. Am I likely to find one in good shape, or should I resign myself to making the choice of either living with it or paying a bazillion dollars having it restored?<P>I'd like to bring the car up to a better level of condition, but a lot of the services I'm finding are prohibitively expensive, or don't cater to my non-muscle, non-Chevy, non-PreWar car.<P>Any advice?

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Guest trevor ward

Hope you can find some or all of this info useful grin.gif" border="0 my '64 le sabre has been out of the paint shop for about two months now and i spent an awful long time selecting a reputable body shop!! Personal recommends can go a long way to peace of mind in wether you are gonna get a quality job, or shafted!! My paint job came in at about $3700 which hurt , but a good job is more than skin deep, as i am sure you will realise! That price even had me taking the car to bare metal myself, and that is a hideous job on an 18 footer!!It was painted with all the doors off, hood and trunk lid off, back glass out, etc... Are your rust repairs surface , or letting in new steel?? 'cos if you plan to use a so called "rust killer" and hope to paint over ,then this will never be a good fix, six months to a year later these areas will come back to haunt you!! Again, painting over existing paint is always a gamble, unless you are absolutely sure that it is sound, with no previous repairs that are hidden.. and as far as the high and low prices are concerned, if you are paying a good guy, then your paint will "reflect" the ground work and thorough block sanding will result in straight panels rather than looking like a ploughed field. Bottom line is , there are no short cuts,.. Pay the man and enjoy the results!!! cool.gif" border="0 <P><BR>''64 le sabre....MONEY PIT !!!!! wardy......

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Automotive restoration is labor intensive. Some make a car look great on the outside for a spell, but because they didnt get to the heart of the problem rust returns and soon a car is back to where it started. This is why the excellent shape original low mile cars are the only cars that bring any money. The fixer uppers are sold relatively cheap. The guy that buys the fixer upper and pays others for repairs spends more in the end than the guy that buys a great shape original.<P>Most restorers I've talked to around here charge a hourly rate plus parts/materials. They talk of jobs in man hours,many man hours. Having redone two cars,one truck of my own now I will admit that time flys by and little seems to get "done". In the end it all comes together and when you look back it becomes apparent that it was labor intensive. These guys need to make a good living too.Truth be known they spend most of their money back into more or better tools.<P>Some will weld new steel over old. Not good.Laminated steel will always start to rust inbetween plus there is already rusty steel to breed new little rusty steel. This would be the $2000.00 guy. Some will remove and refabricate these areas this is more labor. Some will cover up the rusted back or underside of panels by undercoating them. Some will sandblast and prime and paint them. Sand blasting is a pain and a risk with mechanical parts,dash board and glass still in vehical. Removing all this stuff is labor intensive. Some will do all kinds of exterior craftmanship and never once look underneath at the undercarriage which is the area that should be done first.Some will smear undercoating on it and tell you "its done".<P>At a body shop look at what goes in and what comes out. Look around and see what methods they use to "fix things up". Then decide what you want from your car. Drive it? Store it and show it occasionaly? Fix it sell it? Keep it forever? Then you can decide what your are willing to spend how intensive a job you need done.<P>Dashboard - I have a cracking red dash on a 75 Delta 88 I'm going to try covering with quality vinyl and will deal with the wrinkled look in the corners.It is a easily removeable flat dash with only the two corners and the front speaker holes,defroster slots to deal with. It will never be a show car because of its current condition. I have no interest in showing and there are enough clean low mile cars, why try to compete with them.It is a driven car so this is what I base my financial decisions on.<P>Good luck, Steve

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