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48LCCOUPE

four hundred thousand dollars + 8 % U.S. dollars

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Dear David,I am assuming these are figures from the BJ auction,now would you PLEASE fill in the blanks.Thanks,diz shocked.gif

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the Zephyr now shown on the LZOC main page 1938 I believe. Custom "rod" but with billet and polished flat V-12. Went for $400,000.00 bid, 8% commission to BJ auctioneers.

Dave grin.gif

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Check out the topic "38 Zephry coupe wins America's Most Beautiful Street Rod" on page 6 (or so) of this forum for a pretty complete description (with links to photos) of this car. It's VERY nice. I like it better than Terry Cook's "Scrape". It's probably worth 400k if you're a high enough roller! AND it's running an absolutely gorgeous V-12!

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Oh boy!! I can't believe you guys, that '38 is not "Scrape", Scrape started off as a '39, became a die-cast model, and has been resold at least once, and is not even very practical, and does not have a V-12 in it, by a longshot, this is a totally different car with it's suicide doors and fantastic Dave Tatom rebuilt V-12, and a fantastic amount of money spent on it, Rolf

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And if there were any restorable coupes still out there, we can kiss 'em goodbye now. Oh well, the $ signs always win out.

Don't get me wrong. It's not that I can't appreciate rods, but for every outstanding one like this, there will be 50 meatball jobs to follow as everyone tries to jump on the bandwagon. And pretty soon ... well, when was the last time you saw an unmolested '32 Ford coupe or roadster for sale? frown.gif

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Might be good to revive the restore-streetrod thread at this point

You think?? Rolf

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Well Dave, if your eyes are a bit better than mine, perhaps you

can read the owners name on the sign shown here, I sure can't, Rolf

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To whom it may concern: I'm not comparing the customized 1938 Zephyr (built for Mike Shiflett) to Terry Cook's 1939 Zephyr "Scrape". I merely stated that I like the looks of Mike Shiflett's car better. For those of you that haven't taken the trouble to go back 6 pages in this forum, I copy the description of the building of the '38 Zephyr written by the builder, Tim Stromberger and rest my case:

I am proud to say this car was built at my shop near Spokane, Wa. My son Marty Stromberger did most of the body mods including chopping the top 3 inches, suicide doors, complete new floor, engine installation and the complete air ride suspension. We even used a 54 Lincoln bumper on the rear that Marty sectioned 18" and turned upside down. My other two employees, Bob Bissonette and Eddy Whipple were instrumental in its wiring, air ride system, stereo system and final assembly.

Extreme Customs owned by Chris Ledgerwood and Russ Freund and their employee Kory Huenink in Otis Orchards, Wa. did more modifications including extending the rear fenders, pie cutting the hood, fabing the smooth curved running boards and the Mercedes headlights. The fender skirts were fabricated to follow the extended fenders. They did all the finish body work and painted the body in Chrysler pewter and Prowler Copper.

Dave Tatom in Mt. Vernon, Wa. built the fabulous V-12 with some extremely rare speed parts.

Flat-o-matic in Oregon built the transmission and provided the adapter to the V-12.

C&B Upholstry in Spokane did the fabulous job on the all leather interior. Mike Shiflett who is the owner was inspired by the "Scrape" car but wanted to retain more of the cars original character by keeping the original flat windshield and the stock hood and side trim.When we first started on this car I felt kind of bad taking a nice looking older restoration and cutting it up, but after disassembling it and and media blasting it I changed my mind. We found that it had rust holes through the roof and all over the firewall. I think the old owner found it at the bottom of a lake. The floor had been replaced and reinstalled with pop rivets. Any sheetmetal that had been replaced had been put back with pop rivets. I guess the guy who restored it didn't own a welder. After several hundred hours if metal replacement we had it back to its former glory. I am extremely proud of my crew and the guys at Extreme Customs for the job they did on this car to allow it to win the "Americas Most Beautiful Street Rod"

Tim Stromberger

Tim's Hot Rods

Greenacres, Wa

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an update of what car is being disscussed.

http://community.webshots.com/photo/65879247/65881477yJMLBL

http://community.webshots.com/photo/65879247/65881718wutmnN

http://community.webshots.com/photo/65879247/65881798HuRqIv

I believe a few things ar undenaly true in this strret rod vs stock thing.

The Zephyr is a beautiful platform on which to build.

12 volts are better than 6

a/c is better than hanging your head out the window

am raidio is now reserved for community service and non english speaking

radials are better than bias

seeing in the dark is better than guessing whats that?

etc.,etc.,etc

grin.gif Dave

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My favorite radio station in the area I live is a tiny 40 watter AM station out of Carmel California called KRML, made famous in the movie "Play Misty For Me" and the call number, 1410, also mentioned in "Bridges of Madison County", Clint likes the Jazz and Blues format too, the only thing I find fascinating about

that '38, is the fact that he used a V-12. and not one of your "better" modern engines, give him a lot of credit for that, would like to hear sometime how it

performs, the engine sure is beautiful, Rolf

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o.k. I have two questions, first why does this thread spread across my screen

for twenty feet and

second, in the pictures, the V12 has two modern cylindrical ignition coils to

replace the 6 volt double ignition coil, what did they use for a distributor?

Dave confused.gif

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I can explain the coils, not the 20 foot spread, Jake does not turn the coils into 12 volts, so like a lot of 12volt freaks who are too young to know about volta-drops and such, he merely wired around the original coil with 2 12V modern ones, ran a similar rig on 6 volt with a converted zephyr ignition on a flathead V-8, when I couldn't find a good coil, and didn't know about Jake, Rolf

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Hey Dave -

No doubt that modern technology offers all of those benefits and more.

But if those were the only considerations, we'd all be much better off

buying new cars and saving our money.

Rather, it seems to me that there are two main reasons people like

*older* cars:

1) Their looks

2) The history they represent, including the original technology

If one's interest is predominantly the looks, then I can see why it

makes no sense to keep the car original. But there are still those

of us who are as much into the history of the old cars as the aesthetics.

Personally, I'd rather dig out a hangnail with a screwdriver than listen

to someone talk about their blown Chevy 350 crate engine that

makes 600 hp, etc. But show me an original set of "Zephyr" distributor condensors,

or the original overspray on the undercarriage, and I'm all

abuzz. No logical reason, it's just the way I'm wired. tongue.gifcool.gif

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I agree, but to a point of sensebility. The dual condensors and distributor and hydraulic power windows are the cool stuff.

What kind of oil do you use? Have you searched around to find 30 weight non-

detergent gum the works up type oil? Do you use old style got milk, type of

brake fluid? Are your spark plugs platinum based? rolled graphite for spark plug

wires? genuine looking wiring with cloth surround, but modern wire, not twisted or braided. The looks are what's important (unless someone drives a Honda Element).

I love the old technology and wonder at the ingenuity of these men and women to come

up with some of the things they did. Always thinking, always inventing, always thinking

of a better way...how do you think those same people would build those same cars

today, with what would be available to them today?

Just some thoughts on a warm Floriduh Sunday afternoon cool.gif

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No question, Dave, it's a matter of degree. And sometimes those modifications are simply necessary. Here's a great example for a *home* -- Jefferson's Monticello has central AC. Fact is, it's the only way they can preserve it given the humidity and crowds that come through it. But that's different than putting in a wetbar and a jacuzzi off of TJ's bedroom.

Oh, and regarding your weather -- SLAP! mad.gifwink.gif

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good point!

"Oh, and regarding your weather -- SLAP!"

sorry I forget sometimes. turned on the a/c in my 1954 chevy truck today. Glad

I had added that convienience. I KNOW -- SLAP!

Dave

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">The 20 ft spread is caused by DizzyDale's "YAHOOOOOOO" with WAY too many "O"s without a space between them. </div></div>

Well I say let's have him Flogged! wink.gifcool.gif

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Diz (and only Diz) can fix it by editing his post and inserting a blank space betwen the "O"s evey 80 characters (or removing some of them)! </div></div>

So there's Diz in the dim light in the corner couning the "O's" 1,2,3,4,5,6,.....78,79,80 space 1,2,3,4,5...

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