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Not mine-1934 Cadillac Series 355


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1 hour ago, TnTony said:

 .     1934 Cadillac Series 355 touring - Picture 5 of 6

Interesting Bumper bars front and rear.

 

Hadn't noticed that style previously but looking at images of 1934 Cadillacs now see that some have this style while others have the.. more "conventional"style.

 

Please explain to someone "down under", where 1934 Cadillacs are very few and far between, why there were differences

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2 hours ago, Ozstatman said:
4 hours ago, TnTony said:

 

 

Hadn't noticed that style previously but looking at images of 1934 Cadillacs now see that some have this style while others have the.. more "conventional"style.

What do you mean by "more conventional style"?  ...the body style,   ...bumpers?    ...wheels?   ...other?

 

Cadillac%201934%20V-8TownSedan.jpg

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Oz, I don't know what the Cadillac people call those? But I have heard a few people refer to them as "bi-plane bumpers" a few times. I am not sure, but I think they were a one year option? What models, I have no idea.

Personally, I prefer my antique automobiles a little earlier than this, so I am not around mid 1930s cars a whole lot. But over the years, I have only seen a few Cadillacs equipped with these bumpers.

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1 hour ago, wayne sheldon said:

Oz, I don't know what the Cadillac people call those? But I have heard a few people refer to them as "bi-plane bumpers" a few times. I am not sure, but I think they were a one year option? What models, I have no idea.

Personally, I prefer my antique automobiles a little earlier than this, so I am not around mid 1930s cars a whole lot. But over the years, I have only seen a few Cadillacs equipped with these bumpers.

Thank you Wayne

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9 hours ago, Ozstatman said:

Please explain to someone "down under", where 1934 Cadillacs are very few and far between, why there were differences

I can explain the rarity factor. From what I recall from my Crestline Publications book, just over 13,000 cars were built under the Cadillac Motor Division, of which over 7,000 were LaSalles. If you do the math, it does not spell good news for Cadillac! 

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On 6/10/2024 at 10:50 PM, Ozstatman said:

Interesting Bumper bars front and rear.

 

Hadn't noticed that style previously but looking at images of 1934 Cadillacs now see that some have this style while others have the.. more "conventional"style.

 

Please explain to someone "down under", where 1934 Cadillacs are very few and far between, why there were differences

The "bi-plane bumpers" were a one-year-only style on the 1934 Cadillacs and LaSalles.  Although very Art Deco/Streamlined Moderne stylish, they proved to be more that than functionally practical.  The two thin blades were attached to the bullet-shaped carrier that contained a spring device that allowed the bumper to recoil two inches on impact then spring back.  In practice, the bumpers were fragile. easily damaged, costly to repair or replace so were replaced for 1935 with the heavier, flat-bar units which while less stylish were far more practical.   A good many 1934 cars had their 'bi-plane bumpers' replaced back in the day which is why so few have them now decades later.

 

Overall, 1934-'35 were real transition years for the Cadillac-LaSalle Division.  Larry Fisher, one of the seven brothers of the Fisher Body fame who had been leading Cadillac-LaSalle during its flamboyant, cost-be-damned late 1920's-early 1930's years stepped aside.  His replacement was Nicholas Dreystadt who had the mandate to rein in the out-of-control multiplicity of series, models chassis and powertrains, rationalize the series and models to share more assemblies and components with other GM divisions with the objective to make Cadillac-LaSalle profitable again.   Even for a corporation the size and wealth of GM, the Depression realities had brought it to heel.   

 

Production for 1934 and 1935 models are reported as a combined total of 8,318, which breaks down to 5,819 (1934) plus 2,499 (1935).  Whereas January introductions occurred for both, the 1936 Cadillac and LaSalles were introduced in October 1935 truncating the last of what might have been a typical 1935 model year.  The 1934 LaSalle was the acknowledged styling leader for the Cadillac-LaSalle line, but more important the harbinger of a new paradigm for the Division and their products.  With relentless efficiency, Mr. Dreystadt not only turned Cadillac-LaSalle fortunes around but also finally once and for all set Cadillac onto the path and then grabbed the premiere luxury car 'crown' from Packard by the immediate pre-war years.  

 

Ask an astute question...get a dissertation...

Steve

Edited by 58L-Y8
syntax corrected (see edit history)
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I don't think the seller's pictures are doing the car justice-look at that front seat. Admittedly a distant picture, but it appears there are no tears in the bench.

A flathead V8 is not a daunting task-parts are available and not expensive.

Chrome, it would appear, might be an issue.

This rear mounted town sedan sure has a lot of style.

 

 

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This certainly looks like a good car to save. This Town Sedan is the Fisher Body design, which I find particularly handsome.Fleetwood offered a different Town Sedan for the larger series. I frankly think this design is the better looking.

 

Picking up on Steve’s comment, “… the production was not large.” Body parts are not easy to find. The V8 engine was unique to 1934 and 1935, as is much of the chrome work.

 

The engine has a Detroit Lubricator updraft carburetor. I think the variant is unique to those two years. It is nestled in the Vee of the engine and essentially hidden by an octopus of manifolds above it. This makes it potentially vulnerable to vapor lock and a pain to access. I suspect it makes it rather vulnerable to engine fire, as updraft carburetors tend to leak. Some people add low pressure electric fuel pumps to counteract the potential vapor lock. This does not reduce the fire hazard. That said, I have found it to be a very reliable, trouble-free carburetor. I haven’t had problems with vapor lock, but I live in the mountains.

 

The pictures show that this car is missing hood ornament and hubcaps. They will be hard to replace. More pictures are needed to determine what else is missing. Instruments for this car show up occasionally on Ebay.

 

There is not enough information to tell if it will be a huge money sink or just a medium money sink. It is clearly a neat car. There are probably no better examples of this model available at this asking price. There are probably lots of other makes in better condition at this asking price. Tough decision.

 

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