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Did Mopar use to make power tools?


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Found this cool drill in the attic. Its a beast. I cannot find any info on the internet regarding mopar ever making power tools? Looking for any additional information. Thanks In advance.

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  • MrRobinson changed the title to Did Mopar use to make power tools?
3 hours ago, MrRobinson said:

Found this cool drill in the attic. Its a beast. I cannot find any info on the internet regarding mopar ever making power tools? Looking for any additional information. Thanks In advance.

20240402_165719.jpg.f9c4daf9d636b67b5eebe70be4dfd877.jpg20240402_165713.jpg.e6d034d22142c4aa6c2b528bf6919233.jpg20240402_165646.jpg.24ac2e0d2dfaa9b17e80c269fee280f8.jpg

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Just curious what everyone is using. I have a mix of both but I wish I would have just bit the bullet and got a Milwaukee bundle.

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Maybe 20 years ago Milwaukee power tools were excellent. Not so sure anymore.  I recently bought 5 almost new looking Milwaukee sawzalls that were Lowe's non working returns, $50 for the lot. I had them all working fine in 2 hours time. The brushes have spade connectors and they simply fell off from the vibration. Other than that particular crappy engineering they looked pretty good inside........Bob

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I've got most every brand of power tool! Electric and Pneumatic. When you buy mostly used or inherit this happens.  But this does not answer the OP's question.

 

It looks modern. By modern I mean after plastic became normal on power tools, maybe late 60s through 90s. Does it have the standard NEMA 5-15P plug? That three prong one so prevalent in the US. Earlier (40s 50s) tools had the two prong plug, some with a green pigtail hanging out to attach to a ground screw.

 

On second look, that might be black metal, not plastic, but then that might mean the manufacturer produced a similar cheaper version with plastic parts that are black and had a different name on it. It has a Black and Decker look to it, but then there are several other similar manufacturers.

Edited by Frank DuVal (see edit history)
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Thanks for the replies gentleman. I was just curious if Mopar put out a line of power tools back in the day. I'd Never seen one before. There are no other ID markings on this except for the green plate you see in the picture. No stampings. No castings. Nothing. My hunch..this is a mid-60's piece like Frank was suggesting. The entire unit is cast aluminum except for the black knob on the black handle. Even the trigger is metal. I cleaned it with a little steel wool to make it shine. It does have a 3-prong plug on the end that's around 5' long!....Another bafflement for me is there absolutely NO info on the internet to be found. Not one crumb.

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My speculation is that it was a factory tool that found its way home in a lunch box. The tag probably replaced the tag that B & D had in its place. Putting the mopar tag is kinda like the 'this tool stolen from so n so' labels. Also, does it have a reverse? For the longest time drills went forward only. There was a Chrysler plant near me (newark assembly) and a lot of people in my area worked there. There was a plethora of Chrysler stuff floating around. When they came out with the double din radio in the 80's those things were hotter than firecrackers!!

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12 minutes ago, RetroPetro said:

Found this last year:

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My dad had one just like that only it had a "U.S. Navy" tag on it.  Came home one time from sea duty and somehow it had crawled its way into his sea bag (or so he told me)! 

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Wonder why someone cut the power cord? Only time we did that at powerplant was if it was beyond saving or had shocked a user due to insulation breaking down.

 

Can't tell if that's a two prong or grounding plug.

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It started out life as a three prong NEMA 5-15P plug. You can see the typical "triangular" shape in the first photo. But, it may have been a two prong plug for most of its life.🤣 I agree, cord cut because of cord damage or internal issue. Read from both the white and black wires in the drill to the case. There should be infinite resistance, with the trigger pulled. Just use the trigger lock to eliminate a needed hand.😉

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