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1938 Pontiac deluxe 6da rear freeze plug


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Hello my Pontiac family a few weeks ago. I took my car for a cruise and the rear freeze plug started leaking can anyone help me and tell me if there is a was to get it with out tearing the whole car apart. I have not started on it I'm looking for the Shop manual any info would help Thank you

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You might be able to get access to it by removing the transmission floorboard cover. I`m not exactly sure if the `37 trans cover includes the toe board, if so it`ll give access, if not the whole toe board will have to be removed.

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It could be the same but I sort of doubt it. There was a lot of change between 35 and 37. 35 doesn't have a full water jacket. 36 does, but there are 2 different freeze plug setups. With 37 came a significant engine redesign...

 

Do you mean the freeze plug  in the very back facing the firewall? That might mean removing the engine if so. My 36 does not have good access to that even with the toe boards out, although yours will be different because you have an all-steel body. The 37 was a whole new car, and the 38 was very similar to 37.

 

I'd take @pont35cpe's advice and remove the floor over the clutch. It is almost certainly removable. That freeze plug is up high on the back of the engine. It is probably higher than the opening, but maybe you can reach it from there.

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Are you sure? Most cars had a large removable panel in the floor in those days. They almost always took transmissions out from the top to work on them. It probably doesn't get you enough access anyway for the freeze plug, but I'll bet it is there. On my 36 it wasn't enough to really get a good shot at it. I did see the inside of it when I had the head off, and it wasn't bad, so I decided to leave it alone. Nevertheless, mechanics used to sometimes be able to "tip" cup-type freeze plugs in when there was no straight shot. A big hammer and a large spoon-type tire iron can be useful, as can a long socket extension, and a long pry bar. I've done quite a few of them on newer cars where access is partly blocked. That was 40 or so years ago, but the trick was to plan ahead so you could push it in quickly, and then use gasket shellac (Indian head) as a sealer. Indian head is extremely slippery when first applied, but the window of opportunity to take advantage of that is short, maybe a minute or two. It either goes in fast, or you clean it up and start over. After that shellac cures for a day you probably won't have any leaks. Always have an extra freeze plug handy in case you warp one.

 

Another thing you might do is use a rubber freeze plug. It is easier to pry out a rusted out plug with a hole in it when you cant get a straight shot, than it is to put one in. Sometimes tipping a side down helps but don't overdo it. I've never lost the plug inside the water jacket, but it is probably possible. I don't particularly like rubber freeze plugs, but they tighten with a wrench, and that can be done from the side. It would sure beat pulling the engine, and no one can see it back there. 

 

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