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1930’s Chevy Compatibility?’s


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Looking at a ‘36 Chevy pickup project, a few other 30’s Chevy parts available to ‘sweeten’ the deal but they are passenger car parts. 
Engine and trans from a ‘32 - does it fit, mount, essentially swap?

’39 Chevy passenger rear/ springs - does it fit, mount, swap? 
Maybe Fords were a little more forgiving but I don’t know about Chevies!

Orimarily concerned about engine/transmission. 

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Welcome

 

The 32 is 194 ci and the 36 is a 207 ci the 207 would be better if you have it. If you can get a 39 or 40 Chevrolet parts list it will have detailed info on the springs in the back of the catalog.  Here is a online site that may help https://chevy.oldcarmanualproject.com/.

 

The vintage Chevrolet club also has a forum which is also helpful on Chevy questions https://vccachat.org/

 

 

Dave

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Dave - thanks! I’ve only seen pictures and I’m interested in taking this truck for a drive. The ‘32 Stovebolt looks and is said to be rebuilt so I’m thinking if it fits (exchanges with truck engine (‘36)), let’s get in the road. That’s all probably way to optimistic but I’d like to drive some while deciding what to do. 
BTW- I think those ‘35-37 Chev p/u’s are the best in design ever!

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It may work I just don't know. If I am remembering correctly the 32 had a mount on the front cross member with two bolts and a mount on each side of the clutch housing. Check how the drive shaft will end up at the 32 transmission as far as length. 

 

Attach some pictures, everyone like pictures!

 

Dave

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'36 was a big transition year for Chevrolet. Last year of the early 6 engine but the first year of a full water jacket. First year of the hydraulic brakes. A '32 transmission can be used in a '36 if you remove the "free wheeling" apparatus off of the end and move the torque tube ball receiver forward. Brake drums are no longer attached to the axle so you do not have to pull the differential cover to work on the rear brakes. Many other small changes as well.

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Other issues you will run into is if you use the earlier transmission you will have to Mickey Mouse some way to mount hydraulic master cylinder, GM mounted clutch and brake pedals to the transmission. They did that because there is not much room.  My truck which is a 36 GMC came from the factory with a Oldsmobile engine that was modified for truck use.  The original motor was worn out and cracked, it took me 10 years to find another, did all the machining to find out it was also cracked, took me more years to find a good core.  The good news for you is that they made a lot of chevys and guys are out there doing the hot rod engine transplant. Good chance you will find one. These trucks are light, only weighs about 3,000 pounds. So the 36 Chevy was around 74 hp, the GMC was around 80. With that hp they perform well up to 50 mph, they climb hills easy and if you do the brakes right it really stops.  I think if you transplant that older small 50 hp engine you will be disappointed in the performance.

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Hey -  great info! Story heard by many folks many times - “ I drove it into the garage! AND, here’s an engine you can use to drive it out!”.

Thanks again. I have to get busy on adjusting my expectations!

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