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Oldsmobile Expert Opinion- 1972 Cutlass Supreme


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Getting the itch again, been online looking and came upon this '72 Cutlass... showing just over 30,000 miles, looks like a re-paint ?? If it was a 130,000 miles, you would see signs like excessive wear with the interior ( seats, steering wheel etc. ), but it looks good.... A build sheet is included in the ad. 

Does anything stands out that doesn't look correct for this model year?

 

Thanks !

 

https://www.hemmings.com/classifieds/dealer/oldsmobile/cutlass-supreme/2718479.html

 

 

 

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Edited by STEVE POLLARD (see edit history)
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I see a few piddly things but nothing that can't be corrected. It has Hurst/Olds blackout taillight lenses and the PCV system isn't right, should be a closed system. The outside mirror isn't factory issue either and the correct chrome one is available reproduction.

 

I'd like to see the body data plate underhood. A Supreme without a vinyl roof is unusual. Not unheard of but unusual. Body plate would verify. VIN will tell original engine configuration.

 

A build sheet tells me this one wasn't built in Lansing. Never seen a build sheet in a Lansing car. VIN will also show the assembly plant.

 

It for sure sounds like an Oldsmobile though!👍😁

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Fremont car, apparent repaint, some aftermaket parts on the engine. Clearly the car has been gone through (repro underhood sound deadener mat. RPO L34 350 4bbl motor. Obnoxiously droning Flowmaster exhaust system. Aftermarket radio. Later-model (1975-newer) SuperStock III wheels with snap-in centers. Build sheet is nice.

 

The "numbers matching" engine appears to be a restamp. Below are the stamp from the car for sale and a known factory stamp from a different 1972 block. Note the difference in the "3", for example. You be the judge.

 

image.png.aa2dcdf18b977248d85b7afbfaf77108.png

 

07-engine-block-vin-stamp.jpg.07abef2585faa201607a4618449888c0.jpg

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2 minutes ago, STEVE POLLARD said:

Thanks Joe...

 

So I'm thinking now it's more like a 130K mile Cutlass....

That isn't clear. The upholstery isn't showing that much wear, and replacement material for that doesn't exactly grow on trees. More likely is that the car just sit for a long time, which is why all the brake and fuel system parts appear to be new. I question the hose clamped braided fuel line.

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3 minutes ago, joe_padavano said:

I question the hose clamped braided fuel line.

I didn't noticed that.... I sent an email to the dealership, asking for a photo of the body plate, I'm curious to see if it had a vinyl top ( what Glenn mention above ) 

 

Steve

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12 minutes ago, STEVE POLLARD said:

I didn't noticed that.... I sent an email to the dealership, asking for a photo of the body plate, I'm curious to see if it had a vinyl top ( what Glenn mention above ) 

 

Steve

I was thinking the same thing

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C08 is vinyl roof code and C60 is factory A/C, but Fremont data plates can be arcane. However, with a build sheet matching the car VIN you can usually figure out how a Fremont car was built.

 

K in VIN indicates this was originally a 4-barrel single exhaust car. No biggie since all Oldsmobile did for dual exhaust on small-blocks was blank off the crossover port on the RH exhaust manifold and install the left side exhaust piping.

 

That front fender spear is a pain to remove. It's retained by studs and speed nuts, and the fenderwell has to be removed and the fender pulled out at the bottom to get at them.

 

On the engine stamp- could just be Fremont weirdness; they were building a mix of Chevrolet, Oldsmobile, Pontiac and Buick A-bodies on the same assembly line and may have used a different stamp font than the other plants. Worst case IMO would be that it's a warranty engine and the dealer stamped the VIN derivative on the service block like they were supposed to when an engine was replaced under warranty.

 

I don't think this is a bad car overall but I also don't think it's a $37k car. At least it does appear to have been done by someone who cared what they were doing but didn't know obscure Oldsmobile details.

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16 minutes ago, rocketraider said:

K in VIN indicates this was originally a 4-barrel single exhaust car

I didn't realized that, I always figured that a 4-barrel would need a dual exhaust system to help the engine breath...

 

Thanks again Glenn.... I appreciate yours and Joe's input !

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Glenn brings up a fair point on the VIN derivative stamp. The trans stamp, which appears unmolested, uses the same fonts as does the engine stamp. The engine stamp just looks too perfect for me, but I guess every so often things do go right.

 

128559797.jpg

 

Here's the build sheet rotated for easier reading. It does show C08, so definitely a vinyl top car, which confirms the repaint. The cowl tag will show paint code 43  G, as shown in box 79 of the build sheet. It would be interesting to know how the trim holes were filled - proper welding or just filler.  Note also that the RPO T44 hood lock was added after the car was delivered, as it does not appear on the build sheet.

 

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Edited by joe_padavano (see edit history)
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As the handle implies, I can give you chapter and verse on Fords of the '30's.  It is impressive to see facts and knowledge brought to bear in the same manner on Oldsmobile in the '60's.  Chicanery and loose statements cannot survive.

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Nice looking car. Dont know a lot about these but it seems like it might be priced in line for what it is. With a repaint and who knows whats going on with the motor being 30,000 miles or 130,000 is irrelevant, at least to me. Being all original and never taken apart does hold some merit on my end as I feel that a factory car will always be tighter than one that has been taken apart. I didnt think that warranty replacement blocks had vins stamped on them? I have seen a few cars with them and no markings. As for the dealers inspection report, I would use that to light the logs in my fireplace. 

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14 minutes ago, TAKerry said:

Nice looking car. Dont know a lot about these but it seems like it might be priced in line for what it is. With a repaint and who knows whats going on with the motor being 30,000 miles or 130,000 is irrelevant, at least to me. Being all original and never taken apart does hold some merit on my end as I feel that a factory car will always be tighter than one that has been taken apart. I didnt think that warranty replacement blocks had vins stamped on them? I have seen a few cars with them and no markings. As for the dealers inspection report, I would use that to light the logs in my fireplace. 

Except that the car isn't all original and has had some amount of disassembly for the vinyl top removal and repaint (and who knows what else). $37K is aggressive but probably not out of line for a dealer's asking price. I'd expect this car to sell at about $29K.

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image.png.b5c04b3823ba724025d46c060688d775.png

 

 

I noticed in this picture that the wheel-lip molding was removed ( probably to demonstrate / check for bondo ) I have to say, I kinda like the look of the Cutlass without a vinyl top !

 

Steve

 

 

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Long as they still have that w/o moulding to put back!😄

 

I like the way those tailpipes are run. 

 

I don't think any GM car from that time was really meant to wear a vinyl roof cover, but since the buying public ate them up GM would put them on anything. Even pickup trucks and station wagons. A vinyl top job cut a little metal finishing and paint expense too, though that came back to haunt them down the road.

 

Story was when the 1970 Supreme coupes were in design stage, they still had the fastback roofline the 68 and 69 cars shared with the F85 and S coupes. 

 

Pontiac had set the personal luxury market on its ear with the 69 GP's roofline, and Chevrolet followed suit with the 70 Monte Carlo. 

 

None other than Bill Mitchell himself came thru the Oldsmobile studio and said the Supreme coupe needed to be a little more "distinctive" in line with the other two.  "Give me some Grand Prix on the roofline, and a little Eldorado on those upper quarter panels". And it worked. Well enough that 1971 Ninety Eights and Toronados adopted the Eldorado crease too.

 

Say what you will about Bill Mitchell's personality, the man had few peers when it came to knowing how to style a car.

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I think the '70 - '72 Cutlass and 442 coupes are particularly handsome and somehow Olds was able to keep that mojo going through the mid ''70s (and early '80s) despite the addition of mandated 5 mph bumpers.  ;)

 

https://journal.classiccars.com/2021/05/24/pick-of-the-day-from-the-time-when-olds-cutlass-was-the-best-selling-car-in-the-us/

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