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Simple Question on Stromberg DD-3 in 1931 Chrysler Imperial


Joao46

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I have learned from the experts here that one should not mess with this carb unless you are an expert and have the proper tools.

 

I just am wondering if it’s hazardous to the carb for me, a guy who is familiar with more modern carbs to only lift the top cover so I can check float height. 
 

From what I can see, it looks like I only need to remove 3 small screws and 2 large ones to be able to free the cover.

 

is that is or is there another more complex disassembly procedure I need to do ?

 

My father tried this but said he still felt some resistance that made him feel there might be another fastener that came in from below and he did not want to remove the carb.

 

So are the 5 fasteners I mentioned all?

 

The car runs very well but it does spit out a bit of gas down the intake manifold drain pipe once it’s shutoff. 
 

It’s interesting it does have that drain. I used to own a 50 Dodge with a similar intake and carburetor placement but it had no drain. 

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Fuel running down the manifold drain tube is normal after a shut down...kinda messy but Packards, Airflows all drip a tiny puddle on most shut downs. 

Usually the  most leakage upon a not fully warmed up engine shut down.

There is a check ball in the manifold that prevents a vacuum leak while the engine is running.

If the engine is running well other than that I'd drive it untill you are confident and have proper info to remove the carb top and be able to check the  float level correctly.👍

 

Edited by c49er (see edit history)
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I would leave it alone until you figure out why you want to run.......it's likely the float height is fine, as the fuel bowl is large enough to draw fine even if the float is set a bit low.

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1 hour ago, edinmass said:

I would leave it alone until you figure out why you want to run.......it's likely the float height is fine, as the fuel bowl is large enough to draw fine even if the float is set a bit low.

Ok, I was more concerned about the float being too high. The car does seem to be running a bit rich based on the color of the plugs. 

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Could be a few different reasons........remember your engine is an L head.......thus it will never completely burn as good as say a 350 Chevy of the 60's and 70's. I rather see a bit of black soot out the tail pipe than melting a valve or piston. If the idle circuit of that carb is plugged it could be running on the main jets at idle...........or maybe not.....I haven't had my hands on one of those carbs in 30 years or more. Do check the distributor......and the advance curve. Often times the unit is not set up anywhere near where it should be. Ed.

 

Did you ever do a compression check wet and dry?

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Removal of the 2 large screws should allow the air horn to be carefully removed.

 

This will expose the linkage to both the accelerator pump and the vacuum piston. This would include the pump lever and the shoulder screw. Removing the shoulder screw (its been awhile, but I THINK it is left-hand thread) will allow the pump lever to removed. Now, both the accelerator pump and vacuum piston may be detached from the pump lever, allowing these items to remain in the bowl. Now removal of the three smaller screws should allow the bowl cover to be removed.

 

Totally free, and non-requested advice:

 

Unless you cannot see the car behind you in the rear view mirror for the black smoke, leave it alone, and DON'T look at the spark plugs ;)

 

Jon

 

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