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1931 Chrysler Imperial Gear Lube


Joao46

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I am concerned about possibly starting another oil battle but I’ll risk it.

 

There is little description on what oil to use on the 31’s driveline so based on at least what Fords seem to be using, I’ve filled both the diff and gearbox with that ‘steam cylinder 600w oil.

 

Things seem to be working ok. But are there any problems I may encounter long term with this lubricant?

 

My concern is the diff. I don’t know if it requires hypoid lube and the 600w does not smell like sulphur like a hypoid lube should.

 

Any tips are appreciated.

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41 minutes ago, Joao46 said:

My concern is the diff. I don’t know if it requires hypoid lube and the 600w does not smell like sulphur like a hypoid lube should.

As a rule of thumb, if the pinion enters the pumpkin (differential housing) at the latter's bottom, it's HYPOID and requires Extreme Pressure (EP) gear oils.  If that's the case, use GL-4 which is friendlier to any yellow-metal components than the more common GL-5.  GL-4 is available from NAPA.  Unless you're frequently driving the car in cold weather, I'd use SAE 140 viscosity.

 

On the other hand, if the pinion enters the pumpkin at its center, that's a NON-HYPOID for which 600-W would be my choice.

 

In any event, check to see if the Owner's Manual sheds any light on whether the diff is hypoid and any recommended lube.

 

Due to felt seals of the day, I fill only to 1/2" or so below the filler hole, to prevent flooding the seals on a cambered street.

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1 hour ago, Grimy said:

As a rule of thumb, if the pinion enters the pumpkin (differential housing) at the latter's bottom, it's HYPOID and requires Extreme Pressure (EP) gear oils.  If that's the case, use GL-4 which is friendlier to any yellow-metal components than the more common GL-5.  GL-4 is available from NAPA.  Unless you're frequently driving the car in cold weather, I'd use SAE 140 viscosity.

 

On the other hand, if the pinion enters the pumpkin at its center, that's a NON-HYPOID for which 600-W would be my choice.

 

In any event, check to see if the Owner's Manual sheds any light on whether the diff is hypoid and any recommended lube.

 

Due to felt seals of the day, I fill only to 1/2" or so below the filler hole, to prevent flooding the seals on a cambered street.

I’ll check how the pinion enters the diff but everywhere on the manual it calls for ‘fluid gear lubricant’ for both the diff and gear box.

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Just now, Joao46 said:

I’ll check how the pinion enters the diff but everywhere on the manual it calls for ‘fluid gear lubricant’ for both the diff and gear box.

Pierce-Arrow switched to hypoid for 1929 and following.  Lubricant definitions are very different now, and "fluid" *might* at the time be a distinction from "semi-fluid" such as John Deere Corn Head Grease (00 lubricant) which we use today for leaking steering boxes.  If you have a non-synchro trans it would indeed use 600-W.  I don't know whether EP gear oils were available in 1931, but I deem them essential for my 1930 Pierce with hypoid diff.  But please check to see if the pinion enters at the bottom or the center--that will guide us.

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