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FS Not mine 1931 Ford Roadster w/rumble seat $15k FB Mktplce Fredericksburg VA


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Deluxe roadster, right?

Lots of bright color.  I can’t recall seeing yellow and red together on an “A”.  

Black wheels/tires would tone things down a lot. It needs new tires, anyway.

Non-white top would help, too.

If it ran well, $15K isn’t too bad, but not with a seized motor.

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I never owned or worked on an early Ford so I am curious; I assume it's a gravity feed fuel system with the gas tank next to the firewall?  Assuming I am correct the fuel in the tank is measured by the dipstick in the passenger side area.  Am I thinking right?

 

Okay so what see in that passenger area are two plastic containers and one looks suspiciously like it's for coolant.  When I look at the motor the water/coolant inlet and the left side of head and block show rust.  Also the 4 plugs have rust build up on them.  I would think this car has overheating issues.  Is this common in the little 4 bangers?

 

Though I am curious about these cars and how the technology was back then, I would not be a buyer because they are not really practical on todays roads!

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6 hours ago, deac said:

I never owned or worked on an early Ford so I am curious; I assume it's a gravity feed fuel system with the gas tank next to the firewall?  Assuming I am correct the fuel in the tank is measured by the dipstick in the passenger side area.  Am I thinking right?

 

Okay so what see in that passenger area are two plastic containers and one looks suspiciously like it's for coolant.  When I look at the motor the water/coolant inlet and the left side of head and block show rust.  Also the 4 plugs have rust build up on them.  I would think this car has overheating issues.  Is this common in the little 4 bangers?

 

Though I am curious about these cars and how the technology was back then, I would not be a buyer because they are not really practical on todays roads!

There's a gas gauge in the dash. The dash is the back of the gas tank. Gravity feed.

 I never had an experience with overheating in my "A", and I don't recall it being a typical "A" issue.  Maybe other owners can chime in.

I was living in an area where there were lots of driving I could do where there weren't a lot of other cars. They go pretty good, stop reasonably well if the brakes are in adjustment, but having the gas tank basically in my lap was always on my mind when I was driving it, so I didn't push it. I never drove on the freeway, nor over 45 MPH. It's a small car, I'm not small, so it was an uncomfortable car for me to drive any great distance anyway. 

If someone wanted to drive long-distance, it might be wise to join an "A" club and go on their tours. I think you'd be more likely to get some respect in traffic if you're in a group.

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8 hours ago, deac said:

When I look at the motor the water/coolant inlet and the left side of head and block show rust.  Also the 4 plugs have rust build up on them.  I would think this car has overheating issues.  Is this common in the little 4 bangers?

 

The seller does state that the engine is "froze up". Overheating is not a problem with the Model A Ford if the cooling system is clean and maintained. 200 cubic inches (3.2 liters) is quite large for a 4 banger. Who makes 4 cyl. that large today? The Model A can be a peppy car if it is well sorted. No problem keeping up with traffic around town. I wouldn't take it on the interstate though. The Model A advertised top speed was up to 65 mph by Ford back in the day.

 

 

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Screen Shot 2023-03-04 at 12.32.52 PM.jpg

 

Edited by AzBob (see edit history)
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I would think with a bad engine this is a 10k car at best. Paint is polarizing, tires can be changed (at a cost) etc. At the asking someone will have 20-25k all in before they are driving down the road for a car that a similar one can bought any day of the week for 16-18k. Not like its a basket case needing a total restoration which we all know is an upside down process, this one looks really nice and should be expected to take out and have fun right away.

 

I had really wanted an A in the worse way. Came close to looking at a couple then realized that although I live in a very rural area I doubt I would ever use it for more than running to town to get bread and milk. I could not drive it to Hershey and some of the car cruises I go to are out of the question road travel wise. I suppose I will stay with 1960 and up.

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Now if one had a good engine laying around it would be a good match,  but not at the listed price.  Like mentioned maybe around 10 put your engine in and you would be good to go.  I gave a good running one away once.  Not that crazy long ago.  Sold the car to a hot rodder who took it for a little less without the engine. 

 

A's make no sense to buy one other than done,  unless you want a scuffy original car with Patina.  That's a different story though.   I tried to find a Roadster Pickup like that to beat around in,  but scruffy and crappy are two different things.  With every 1000 spent at purchase you seem to get a $2000-$3000 uptick in condition.

 

Even the done cars still seem to need some work.  Still taking care of little things on mine I thought were all done.   Nothing significant.    Just making things a tad more correct or atleast authentic looking as well as a full cut and buff of the paint.

 

That and I still have yet to drive it.  Hoping for no major surprises there.

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A nice thing about As are some predictability in terms of cost.

 

An engine can be sourced from several reputable shops outright from around $3,000 - 4,500  but best to assume other mechanical needs.  Tough to assess without it running.

 

Too bad the engine is stuck vs. Just not running.  With the simplicity of mechanical brakes, gravity fed fuel, minimal electricals, etc. A gpod car can be woken up and fpund to have minimal needs.  80% of the As that come put of storage it seems need a ton of work but now and then a r eal good one comes to market.  We will have ours long term and I doubt I will buy another but I would look for one that has been set up for touring - OD, etc. Because it's a better bet the car is well sorted.

 

Bear in mind $15 - 18k is the range for a decent running, decent looking 30 - 31 roadster these days.

 

The yellow is polarizing maybe but available on the deluxe models.  I don't hate it but prefer a few other stock colors on these A roadsters.

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2 hours ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

A nice thing about As are some predictability in terms of cost.

 

An engine can be sourced from several reputable shops outright from around $3,000 - 4,500  but best to assume other mechanical needs.  Tough to assess without it running.

 

 

YES !!    You can buy ANYTHING for a Model A and the parts are VERY inexpensive. 

Several excellent parts sellers 

TWO great national clubs

Possibly the easiest old car to own/fix yourself. Excellent hobbyist support, every town has someone with model A knowledge

We just had a great several page  tutorial on the cost of rebuilding pre-war engines. As Steve points out the buyer of this car will have no such trouble.

I  bet this car doesn't need an engine. Maybe, but I suspect It could be healed. 

If it was over heating could be badly damaged. But, as @auburnseeker said, used good engines  are around 

My opinion: every car collection over 4-5 cars should have a model A in it, because to "the masses" its obviously a very old early car, yet it is easy to fix/maintain, very easy to drive( if you car drive a 1975 Nova stick shift, you can drive an A) ,  you will never be "down " all summer waiting for a part to be found or MADE 

 The Yellow is correct Bronson yellow I think. Not my favorite but if you want to be seen in a parade or just out for a drive......

Edited by Terry Y
spelling (see edit history)
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7 hours ago, TAKerry said:

 

 

I had really wanted an A in the worse way. Came close to looking at a couple then realized that although I live in a very rural area I doubt I would ever use it for more than running to town to get bread and milk. I could not drive it to Hershey and some of the car cruises I go to are out of the question road travel wise. I suppose I will stay with 1960 and up.

Kerry , Give a model A a try, if you are disappointed you can sell it. I suspect you will keep it though.  They are very enjoyable, and can be made to go 50 mph, easily.

20 years ago my father and I put high speed gears in the rear end of a 1930 coupe' It would go 65mph, but that was a bit much for me. The gears made it so you could cruise 50mph all day with out hurting the car.  Also, instead of gears, you can install a 5 speed transmission(over-drive)  

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Here is an interesting read by Henry Ford on the introduction of the Model A in late 1927.

 

Interesting that top speed is mentioned. "The new Ford will ride comfortably at fifty and sixty miles per hour.  It has actually done sixty-five miles an hour in road tests."

 

121322%20The%20New%20Ford%201927.jpg

Edited by AzBob (see edit history)
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I agree with nearly all said above. Model A Fords are great prewar cars, antique by almost everybody's standards, with fantastic  club support almost every civilized corner of the country. I did have one I was restoring bout fifty years ago, then decided I just really wanted cars just a bit earlier and sold it. Several times over the years, I have reconsidered that, and thought about getting one again. If my circumstances improve enough that I can buy something in decent condition? I may yet end up with a model A. As long as I have at least one good earlier car.

I have had many friends that loved their model A Fords. Even a few of my best friends have had model As they used a lot. One of my closest friends had a 1929 Town Sedan, well accessorized, and nicely restored. He and I went to many meets together in his car, including one MAFCA national meet in Southern California. I often drove his car when heading home. Seriously, unless one is too large to fit behind the steering wheel? What is there about them to not like?

 

I have always recommended model As as great cars for club and parts availability reasons, as one of the best antique automobiles for beginners to real antiques. 

 

One observation about this car. I followed the link to the fb advertisement. That engine doesn't look very nice. It looks like it night be the worst blown head gasket I have ever seen? Or maybe it was very seriously overheated? Stuck might be one thing. Engines sit for awhile, valves or pistons can get stuck on minor rust. Even if some relatively minor damage was somehow done? The model A engine can "often" be repaired by a competent mechanic.

Then again, either a badly blown head gasket or a badly overheated engine can leave cylinders filled with coolant which may cause severe rust or other major issues. A severely overheated engine might not be repairable, short of an expenditure well beyond the value of the car. However, fear not. In spite of over a half century as the most driven of all antique automobiles, there are still engines out there waiting to be brought back and put into a nice car again. So even if the engine is basically destroyed? The car can be repaired for a fair price.

Edited by wayne sheldon
I hate leaving typos! (see edit history)
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