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What car looks good with whitewalls? Post a pic to show


SC38dls
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To go along the lines of a few other threads  about loving or hating whitewalls I thought this maybe interesting. What car do you think looks good with whitewalls? Post a pic but tell us what the car is as many (like me) don't automatically know the models based on door handles or side trim or style of the trunk. 

I'm posting my 38 Studebaker State Commander as one I think looks good with them. But I've never seen a black one without whitewalls so that may be part of my reasoning. Tell me if you agree or not. 

dave s 

 

 

38 SC 3MAY 16.JPG

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I understand that whitewalls were not considered as OEM equipment on any of my collector cars. But, I could not imagine them without that added bit of extravagance.

F8C415DB-6772-4C26-9C01-27113A7AAC03.jpeg

8056CD59-20AD-47DB-BD16-AE00A821247C.jpeg

B5D915F1-D91B-4CB8-A8BE-74BC4276FF10.jpeg

C665B5CE-BEE9-4B84-9D1F-46E5756B242A.jpeg

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1 hour ago, SC38dls said:

'm posting my 38 Studebaker State Commander as one I think looks good with them. But I've never seen a black one without whitewalls so that may be part of my reasoning. Tell me if you agree or not. 

dave s 

Here is my 1938 Studebaker, with and without. I think for this car it is definitely whitewalls.

38l1.jpg

38tires.jpg

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20 minutes ago, Jack Bennett said:

I understand that whitewalls were not considered as OEM equipment on any of my collector cars. But, I could not imagine them without that added bit of extravagance.

F8C415DB-6772-4C26-9C01-27113A7AAC03.jpeg

8056CD59-20AD-47DB-BD16-AE00A821247C.jpeg

B5D915F1-D91B-4CB8-A8BE-74BC4276FF10.jpeg

C665B5CE-BEE9-4B84-9D1F-46E5756B242A.jpeg

Since the trailer's fenders and wheels match the body of the roadster,

I think your trailer deserves WhiteWall Tires Too !

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The other thing to consider with the 1931 Chrysler CD-8 De Luxe is it was described by the factory as "low Profile" and has 17" not the usual 18" tires. For me, my automobile, my research, my easily reversable decision, I have white walls.

image.jpeg.61264c0b09b39fba8b5a76d65a9fc353.jpeg

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22 minutes ago, Marty Roth said:

Since the trailer's fenders and wheels match the body of the roadster,

I think your trailer deserves WhiteWall Tires Too !

The car’s name is Veronica, and the trailers name is Archie. I built both from basket cases, and had absolutely no idea where to start, or how to finish the projects. I began work on Veronica shortly after I lost my wife, and the bucket on a frame with the rudiments of a engine eventually became a really fun machine to drive. And, the whitewall tires it rolled on were a part of the package deal when I bought the car. On the other hand, it is fun driving Veronica when the roads are fairly level, reasonably straight, not too many killer hills, and there is NO contact with the motoring public. The 1923 Dodge Roadster will do 200 miles per hour if it is going down a really steep hill. But, the single axle, rear wheel only brakes have absolutely no contractural or moral obligation to safely stop it. And the speed of 30-40 miles per hour  in the DODGE seems like 120-130 miles per hour to me in a modern car, but it irritates the impatient drivers to the extent they can make a pleasure ride to a cemetery a tormented ride to hell instead.

So, when I built Archie to haul Veronica, my Willys (Willy), and my old tractor (Petunia) to a place where I could drive, and enjoy them, I was more concerned with putting tires on it to make it usable, than I was in making it pretty. I have put enough miles on it and my old F-250 to justify new tires, and whitewalls will be at the top of my “gotta-have” list.

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I take a practical approach. 
 

I like ‘em white on my ‘38 Chrysler. My ‘38 Plymouth does not get whitewalls. I tend to think the Plymouth was an entry level new car. It’s market might have been the shoe salesman. Not the bank manager.  The Chrysler? Indeed the Bank Manger might own it.  He wants whitewalls.  He’s likely less frugal. A 4 door sedan Plymouth, the family piles in to go on a picnic on the weekend. The two door Chrysler, a free wheelin’ single guy is taking his lady friend out on Sat night.  It gets whitewalls. 

 

4E577CB4-9718-413B-8828-251E7472D3ED.jpeg

67EEBBEE-9B35-4DF3-B221-E510133471F9.jpeg

Edited by keithb7 (see edit history)
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39 minutes ago, Jack Bennett said:

The car’s name is Veronica, and the trailers name is Archie. I built both from basket cases, and had absolutely no idea where to start, or how to finish the projects. I began work on Veronica shortly after I lost my wife, and the bucket on a frame with the rudiments of a engine eventually became a really fun machine to drive. And, the whitewall tires it rolled on were a part of the package deal when I bought the car. On the other hand, it is fun driving Veronica when the roads are fairly level, reasonably straight, not too many killer hills, and there is NO contact with the motoring public. The 1923 Dodge Roadster will do 200 miles per hour if it is going down a really steep hill. But, the single axle, rear wheel only brakes have absolutely no contractural or moral obligation to safely stop it. And the speed of 30-40 miles per hour  in the DODGE seems like 120-130 miles per hour to me in a modern car, but it irritates the impatient drivers to the extent they can make a pleasure ride to a cemetery a tormented ride to hell instead.

So, when I built Archie to haul Veronica, my Willys (Willy), and my old tractor (Petunia) to a place where I could drive, and enjoy them, I was more concerned with putting tires on it to make it usable, than I was in making it pretty. I have put enough miles on it and my old F-250 to justify new tires, and whitewalls will be at the top of my “gotta-have” list.

Hi Jack,

 

Congrats on a nicely executed project, as well as your choice to use them well while respecting your late wife driving Veronica with visits to the cemetery.

Maybe someday some back road touring with one of the clubs you'll ride along with Reggie, Betty, Jughead, Moose, and Midge.

I can just picture Willy heading up the road, sweet looking Veronica bouncing along, happily riding Archie.

 

PS: Hang a mop (or a wig) over the outer half of Veronica's right headlight.

Veronica Lodge wore her hair that way in the Archie comic books, emulating actress Veronica Lake who trademarked that look.

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2 minutes ago, Marty Roth said:

Hi Jack,

 

Congrats on a nicely executed project, as well as your choice to use them well while respecting your late wife driving Veronica with visits to the cemetery.

Maybe someday some back road touring with one of the clubs you'll ride along with Reggie, Betty, Jughead, Moose, and Midge.

I can just picture Willy heading up the road, sweet looking Veronica bouncing along, happily riding Archie.

 

PS: Hang a mop (or a wig) over the outer half of Veronica's right headlight.

Veronica Lodge wore her hair that way in the Archie comic books, emulating actress Veronica Lake who trademarked that look.

“Veronica” is actually a feminine way of naming the car after her previous owner “Vernon”. I wanted to name it something closer to Vernon, but the car is female from the tread of her skinny tires to the feminine curve of her top bowes. On the other hand, my car hauler is a guy, with guy idiosyncrasies, and guy bad habits. He and Veronica are a good team and together afford me a lot of hours of fun and relaxation. And, thanks to fellows like you, give me something to talk about which we mutually like.

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1 hour ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

Our 39 120, another example where most were likely BW, but, the WWW tires seem to work well with the color and help dress a sedan a bit

Steve

The fact you don't also have spot or fog lights on the car is why the car works well with just white walls. The color choice helps too.  

Walt

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1 minute ago, CChinn said:

544096B4-73CF-4E6A-9A01-68360113FE03.jpeg.9b8f7ae69fd92215d83a061535955b89.jpegit had black walls when I bought it, but I like white wall tires, so I changed them. 

It is a matter of personal choice-

just as with the choice of contrasting color for the '40 Chevy's fenders.

Didn't come that way, but if you like it that is all that matters.

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Would NARROW whitewalls be considered for 

cars of the 1920's?  They are a part of automotive

history that has been pretty much forgotten.

In fact, they are so much forgotten that no company

likely makes them anymore.  Yet, here they are clearly

illustrated in this 1923 ad for United States Tires:

Tire narrow whitewall--Natl Geog 4-1923.jpg

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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