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1948 Continental V-12 Oil pan removal


dalef62
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I am thinking about removing the oil pan on my 48 Continental coupe to repair/replace the oil level float.  What needs to be done to get the pan off while still in the car?  I thought I had seen a post on pan removal but, 4 pages back and no sign of it. 

Any help would be appreciated.  

Dale

Edited by dalef62 (see edit history)
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Dalef62,

               I did the same thing for the same reason  about 12 years ago on my '48LC Coupe.   First , use a lift or  a set of GOOD jack stands. You need the car at least 14" or more off the garage floor. I don't have a lift. I also used for reference , but really didn't need it; "Ford, Lincoln, & Mercury Service Manual, for Cars & Trucks- 1946. The one I have is a condensed (repop) 5"x8" Try to get this if you don't have it all ready. The oil float in my engine also sank and I wanted to clean out any "mud" that was in the pan before I started the engine. It had not run for over 10 years. Next you will have to remove or move aside any sheet metal splash pans. Next remove the exhaust cross over pipe, drop the drag link from the pitman arm. The next thing is remove the cap holding the front radius rod (WISH BONE) . Good time to replace the rubber ball that cushions the radius rod, this is a Mercury part. You should not have to remove the radius rod, just pry down and wedge a short length of 2"x4"so as to make clearance. Remove caps screws and drop pan down, you may have to turn engine over a little for crank shaft counter weights to clear as you maneuver pan around.  In my engine, the snap in "float cage" that keeps the float from being wrapped around the crank was missing. The float will last about 20 seconds before it is scrap brass if this part is missing. You may have just a leaking float. Any questions "E" me --larry1938zephyr@gmail.com

This "post" looks neat now, look what happens when I submit?????

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Having pulled the pan more times than I'd care to mention, I finally figured out that if I used a 2 X 4 under the frame, I could use a long jimmy bar to force the center of the wishbone down far enough to fit four short pieces of 2 X 4 between the center ball and the frame where the ball was mounted.  You have to jockey the pan a bit and maybe break loosen the gasket, but should come right out.  When re-installing, I put generous amounts of Permatex oil resistant sealer on both the pan and the rear bearing retainer to seal the dip in the back of the pan.  Hold the oil level indicator wire up with a clothes pin on top

Abe

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All good points, I also found , since I work by myself;  I find that little tricks help to complete a job.  When I replace a pan back on the engine from underneath, I make up 4  studs; can be spare pan cap screws with heads cut off or 4 short lengths  of "all thread" about 1 1/2" long and same thread as the pan bolts.  Hacksaw a slit on one end the width of a suitable flatblade screw driver. Now screw these in the cleaned out holes on 4 corners of the pan rails.  Prep the pan/gasket as mentioned by Abelincoln , fit the pan up and screw on 4 nuts the same thread as the fabricated studs. I have used a  2x4 about a foot long wrapped with thick rags and gently "floorjacked" the pan up. After the pan is in place and settled in , install all of the bolts. Don't tighten down  yet. 

Remove studs from the 4 corners and replace with the 4 pan bolts. DON'T forget the  special bracket  ,P/N 51A-11140; that keeps the starter at 90 degrees to flywheel. Worked for me

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  • 4 weeks later...

Ok, I have started this project and have jacked it up and have blocks under the tires, will I need to use jack stands and let the wheels hang free to relieve the pressure on the wishbone?  I am looking at the tie rod link from tie rod to tie rod and it is bent, should it be that way or should it be straight?  So far things are coming apart fairly easy, hope it continues that way...

Dale  

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Making progress on the pan removal.  This car has low oil pressure when it warms up.  I know that is a common problem and that most people say drive it, but I was wondering if I should do anything while the pan is off besides cleaning the oil pan and pump screen?

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All the bolts are now out of the oil pan and it is loose, but the starter is holding it in.  How do you get the starter off?  I know it sounds dumb, but I only see the two bolts on the brush end of the starter.  I loosened the one to get the bracket out of the way of the pan but didn't take it out.  I am afraid to take both out as the starter will come out in pieces, right?  I will have to look through all the books I got from my dad's stuff to see if i have a shop manual for this thing!   LOL

Thanks for your help!

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Thanks to all that helped, the pan is off and the sunken float is full of oil.  Starter came off nicely Charles.  Had one hidden bolt on top of the pan above starter but found it before I did any damage.  Now to repair or replace float and get new gaskets.  Need to clean everything up too.

Any thoughts on the oil pump???

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Your pan looks pretty good.  Mine had so much gunk the oil wouldn't come out when I pulled the plug.  Some of us use the Melling M-15 high volume pump and a pickup tube from Speedway motors to replace the stock.  Can't hurt, but if there is a lot of wear and increased clearances, pressure might not go up much.

Abe

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Gaskets arrived Sunday from Herrel, awesome service!  Float tested and a small hole was found and repaired.  Starter and pan is painted and once dry will be ready for installation.  Hopefully I will have it running again soon!  

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12 hours ago, 19tom40 said:

Get some water boiling, remove it from the heat source, insert the float in the water. If there are any leaks, you will see bubbles rising from the leak as the air inside the float expands due to heat.

That's what I did!  Thanks.

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