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What is the Most Unusual Vehicle That You Have Driven


3macboys
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Some of the comments on the Work of Art -Delahaye thread got me thinking about some of the different vehicles I've driven.  For me perhaps the most unusual was a Buffalo Springfield roller with rear wheel hydraulic steering as a summer student working for the city.  I was on the asphalt crew doing road patching and quickly figured out that I could be standing at the back of the truck shoveling the hot asphalt by hand or sitting on the roller.  It was not unlike this one, took a bit to get use to the back end swinging out from under you.

 

Auctions International - Auction: Town of Hammond Highway #11968 ITEM: 1968 Buffalo  Springfield KT10B10 Pavement Roller

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Amtrack passenger train, 3 or 4 cars long.  Age 11 or 12.  We were picking up my grandmother at the train station on a Sunday afternoon, being into trains, dad and I got talking to a fellow I believe was the dispatcher.  Anyway he showed us some of the behind the scenes workings at the station and explained the yard was a couple miles away.  "Come back tonight, say 7 PM and he can run an engine down to the yard". 

 

We did, I got to run the train, for about 2 or 3 miles and we rode back to the station in a car.  It was a lot of fun!

 

That would have been 73 or 74.  The RR guy was taking a risk then, to be nice to perfect strangers.  It would never happen today!!

Edited by Steve_Mack_CT (see edit history)
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The most complex piece of equipment I have owned and run is a cable swing shovel, crane, dragline, drag hoe, Etc. All are the same basic machine with different attacments. It takes a lot of coordination to master the "dance" that makes it look easy to others. Also, every make had it's own ideas on what lever and pedal would do what. In a North West the controls are way different than in a Bay City or Bucyrus Erie. Even among the same make every machine has its own feel and quirks. Want something complicated and unique in your life? Go buy a vintage Swing Shovel. The one in the photo I built from scrap and scratch to have one small enough to move it easily to shows to educate the general public on how the machines worked that built the highways and infrastructure of most of the world. Second most complex is a road grader. Second photo, me running a 1928 Hanson I revived after sitting for 40 years. It sat idle from 1957 until 1997. Come and watch it run at the CAMA show this weekend. A photo of my Cat Model 12 serial 6M17.  A very rare machine as it is powered by a G-4600 gas engine. Also a rather complex machine as the blade can be swung and tilted in a multitude of angles. Only 56 Cat 12's were made this way. The rest were all Diesel. A Cat model 12 has been coined by historians as the first truly modern road grader and was first built in 1938. 

  

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M60 Main Battle Tank while in training to be a Tanker (11E20) in the US Army.  At Fort Knox, Kentucky, 1971.  The tank, from what I remember, had a 2 speed automatic tranny, power brakes and power steering with a steering handlebar like a kids tricycle.  Combat loaded they were around 55-60 tons!?!?  It's been a while so this might not be right, but close. 

 

Capt. Harley😉

 

"Skirts are for Women and not Car Fenders"

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4 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

After servicing and lubricating I would run one of these full speed the length of the foundry to watch for loose rail bolts hopping around. Made me smile then, makes me smile now.

 

Foundry Crane - Foundry Crane for Sale with High Quality

Unfortunately, by the time I was able to 'tour' what was left of a huge foundry, the overhead "car/crane" was long gone!!  https://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/forum/your-studebaker-forum/general-studebaker-specific-discussion/6882-south-bend-self-tour-2-the-foundry

 

Craig

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25 minutes ago, DonMicheletti said:

While you dont call it driving I did run Southern Pacific steam locomotive # 2472.

I was extremely involved with its reatoration and operation

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Don 2472 Trot.jpg

Run it, yes indeed!!  I am sure it takes some skill and feel.

 

That is a real train!!  The Amtrack electric had a speed control or throttle if you will, a brake, a whistle or horn pull and maybe a gauge or two, speedo and not much else.  Proof a child could do it compared to steam!!  Very cool indeed!! 👍

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2 hours ago, DonMicheletti said:

While you dont call it driving I did run Southern Pacific steam locomotive # 2472.

I was extremely involved with its reatoration and operation

Gprofile.jpg

Don 2472 Trot.jpg

Thank you for being on the team that restored 2472!

 

One of my best birthday gifts ever was an hour at the controls of that engine which I count as "the most unusual vehicle that I have ever driven". 

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My interpretation of what a vehicle is must vary severely from a lot of people here, what many consider a vehicle I consider a machine or equipment ( like construction equipment )

so my definition means a horse and wagon, horse and coach, car, truck, motorcycle,

Austin Clark owned the two most unusual vehicles ( cars) I ever drove. One was his Waverly electric  after I charged up the numerous batteries for its operation at a car meet a few miles from his house. and the other was his Pungs Finch ( when it was painted white and a roadster when he owned it) . Not sure but that P-F may be the car he found on a upper floor of a toilet paper factory in NY City, can't quite recall now as it has been 40+ years.

The fastest "old" car ride was with him also ( in a pre WWI era car) .

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Thanks to a fellow member here, a 1910 Russell, with knight sleeve valve engine. 
Coolest for sure in my books. 
 

I have driven and operated just about everything made by Caterpillar. Excavators. Trucks. Forestry machines. Loaders. Dozers. Skid steers. Pavers. Packers. Whatever. All different and fun.  My fave, playing with a D10T dozer in a land clearing site in the mountains of the Canadian Rockies. 

Edited by keithb7 (see edit history)
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Maybe turn the question on it’s head……..what is the one car you would like to have a chance to drive?

 

I’m very lucky and have driven about as many pre war cars as is humanly possible. The one car on my list before I cash it in.

 

Doble

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49 minutes ago, edinmass said:

Maybe turn the question on it’s head……..what is the one car you would like to have a chance to drive?

 

I’m very lucky and have driven about as many pre war cars as is humanly possible. The one car on my list before I cash it in.

 

Doble

I'd take a crack at a Packard Model Thirty Touring or a P-51 Mustang.

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Actually, I did get to fly the P-51 Mustang, technically a TF-51 dual seat plane, that belongs to the Collings Foundation.  I had my Studebaker hat on.  I have a pilot's license, and they signed my logbook for a half hour as pilot-in-control.  We did some aerobatics until my stomach couldn't take any more 4-point rolls.

 

859115234_P51cockpit-Gary091317-1024.jpg.83c57ea7e12a8d2be8535ddbcc1acc87.jpg

Me in the cockpit of the TF-51 at New Bedford, MA.

 

1665018347_P51atNewBedford.jpg.9ed12986eec015441de1f1a77d8a3c55.jpg

The TF-51 on the ramp.

 

Edited by Gary_Ash (see edit history)
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12 hours ago, Brass is Best said:

I'd take a crack at a Packard Model Thirty Touring or a P-51 Mustang.


Did both…Model 30 roadster….….the 51 same as Gary. I no longer do vintage aircraft. A good friend went down in the Collins B-17 in Hartford a few years ago. We went through the entire school system together. (1-12) Tragic loss.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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11 hours ago, Gary_Ash said:

Actually, I did get to fly the P-51 Mustang, technically a TF-51 dual seat plane, that belongs to the Collings Foundation.  I had my Studebaker hat on.  I have a pilot's license, and they signed my logbook for a half hour as pilot-in-control.  We did some aerobatics until my stomach couldn't take any more 4-point rolls.

 

859115234_P51cockpit-Gary091317-1024.jpg.83c57ea7e12a8d2be8535ddbcc1acc87.jpg

Me in the cockpit of the TF-51 at New Bedford, MA.

 

1665018347_P51atNewBedford.jpg.9ed12986eec015441de1f1a77d8a3c55.jpg

The TF-51 on the ramp.

 

Outstanding!

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