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Work of art - Delahaye with body by Saoutchik


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1 hour ago, George Smolinski said:

What is it?

187F35D2-4AA8-40C4-AD07-28319C213FB1.jpeg

Ron Benach owned and restored it. Ron was a really good guy to me when I worked for him back in the 1970’s. Fran Roxas did the mechanicals. So called DDD. Diane Dor’s Delahaye. Not my cup of tea but Ron liked a challenge.

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Like it or not, the turquoise Delahaye would sure attract attention.  Can anyone comment on what cars of this genre are like to drive, compared to a more conventionally-bodied contemporary?  I'm guessing visibility would be worse, as would the sense of where the car ends.  Did anyone really drive these things back in the day?  Or were they always understood to be mechanized sculpture?  

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The French artisans built some really wild cars in the 1930s and even a few in the late 1940s. I think most people really love them, or hate them? I am not sure why, in spite of the fact they are considerably newer than the cars I really care about? But I generally like the crazy things. I sometimes wonder if part of that is my childhood. My dad was part owner of the second television sales and repair shop opened in the San Francisco South Bay area. We had tv very early, before all that made for television programming. So the cartoons I watched early in my life were the ones from the 1930s and 1940s! They often used classical music (my favorite music!), and poked fun at culture from the eras. Which included long curvy French cars twisting their way around corners. Every time I see one of these cars? I have images from those cartoons dancing in my head. And it makes me smile.

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I can't help but wonder how many great/rare/interesting cars were lost during WWII...?  Maybe the truly great ones were moved out of possible harms way to other countries or sequestered in a vault somewhere.  

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9 hours ago, Erska said:

Like it or not, the turquoise Delahaye would sure attract attention.  Can anyone comment on what cars of this genre are like to drive, compared to a more conventionally-bodied contemporary?  I'm guessing visibility would be worse, as would the sense of where the car ends.  Did anyone really drive these things back in the day?  Or were they always understood to be mechanized sculpture?  

Its the TURNING RADIUS I'd be more concerned about in that car!

 

Craig

Edited by 8E45E (see edit history)
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12 hours ago, Bhigdog said:

What,s with the proboscis jutting out over the grill?......bob

It's called the "Narwhal look" and had a brief vogue on French custom cars in the late forties or very early fifties. It seems the idea was to give the car a longer hood line and a long sweeping profile from front to back by extending the hood out over the grille a few inches.

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)
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11 hours ago, Erska said:

Like it or not, the turquoise Delahaye would sure attract attention.  Can anyone comment on what cars of this genre are like to drive, compared to a more conventionally-bodied contemporary?  I'm guessing visibility would be worse, as would the sense of where the car ends.  Did anyone really drive these things back in the day?  Or were they always understood to be mechanized sculpture?  

They were all special order, custom built for flamboyant millionaires. Yes they were used as transportation. The one in the pictures was made for an Englishman living in Paris Sir John Gaul who also entered it in Concours D' Elegance.

 

Later it was sold to British film star Diana Dors.

https://www.classicandsportscar.com/news/csc-features/delahaye-175-s-diana’s-deco-delight

 

See it running

https://www.facebook.com/vintagecelebritycar/videos/diana-dors-delahaye/1190118814412438/

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  • Peter Gariepy changed the title to Work of art - Delahaye with body by Saoutchik

I linked to a brief video of the car on the move above. It sure looks big and unwieldy but probably no more than some expensive American convertibles of the same era.

 

https://www.facebook.com/vintagecelebritycar/videos/diana-dors-delahaye/1190118814412438/

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)
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14 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

For swoopy cars of the 1930's this is my favorite, it was in the lobby of the Nethercutt collection when I saw it. Think its footprint is the size of a Model A Ford. 

 

(1) Nethercutt’s 1931 Bugatti Type 51 Dubos Coupe | Jay Leno's Garage - Bing video

1931-Bugatti-Type-51-Dubos-Coupe-burg-rVl.jpg

Nice looking but you need a Lilliputian chauffeur to drive it. 

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2 hours ago, rocketraider said:

It's gorgeous and representative of its times, but way out of my league.

 

Anyone else see the genesis of Edsel in the front end styling?

 

Don't hit me no more!!😖😖187F35D2-4AA8-40C4-AD07-28319C213FB1.jpeg.2cf6a732cee290ce7531fbf89269da5d.jpeg.jpg

 

 

Stunning & Gorgeous! 

 

    I do also see the Alpha in the grill!

 

God bless

Bill

https://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/threads/nationwide-single-car-transport-hauling-open-or-enclosed.614419/

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6 hours ago, Rusty_OToole said:

It's called the "Narwhal look" and had a brief vogue on French custom cars in the late forties or very early fifties. It seems the idea was to give the car a longer hood line and a long sweeping profile from front to back by extending the hood out over the grille a few inches.

It is interesting the use of the term narwhal' or narval in French as the narwhal looks like this - 

 

See the source image

 

They actually look more like a Beluga - 

 

See the source image

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On 9/21/2022 at 4:31 AM, wayne sheldon said:

The French artisans built some really wild cars in the 1930s and even a few in the late 1940s. I think most people really love them, or hate them? I am not sure why, in spite of the fact they are considerably newer than the cars I really care about? But I generally like the crazy things. I sometimes wonder if part of that is my childhood. My dad was part owner of the second television sales and repair shop opened in the San Francisco South Bay area. We had tv very early, before all that made for television programming. So the cartoons I watched early in my life were the ones from the 1930s and 1940s! They often used classical music (my favorite music!), and poked fun at culture from the eras. Which included long curvy French cars twisting their way around corners. Every time I see one of these cars? I have images from those cartoons dancing in my head. And it makes me smile.

My first thought when I saw this car was of something that I could imagine seeing in an old Popeye cartoon or the such! 

I love this car as a piece of rolling art.

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