Jump to content

good models and less good models?


scatcat2018
 Share

Recommended Posts

I am looking a some Pierce Arrows to consider for purchase. I seem to recall reading somewhere that there were some models that were, shall we say, not quite as good as some other models. From what I have seen, P-A was all over the place with model numbers, engine sizes and wheelbases; so it can be a bit confusing trying to compare models from different years.  I cannot remember where I read about the different attributes of the different models, so I'm asking if someone can either steer me to some place where I can read about the relative merits of each model; or, alternatively just tell me which models are thumbs up and which models are thumbs sideways (not down). Models I am currently looking at are 845, 80, 1601, 133 for what that is worth, but they may disappear and a new model enter the picture. So maybe better if someone can just point me to a reference source where I can read for myself. Thank you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please look at the Pierce-Arrow Society website www.pierce-arrow.org to begin your orientation.  There's enough there to keep you busy a couple of hours!  In the meantime:

 

* 845  = 1935 8-cylinder, substantially the same as 1934 840A.  385 cid, S-W inertial power brakes, 4.23 final drive ratio, synchromesh 2nd & 3rd, cruise speed 58-60.

 

* 80 = 1925-27 6-cylinder, junior series to 33/36, 289 cid, cruise speed 45, no synchro (crash box).

 

* 1601 = 1936 8-cylinder. 385 cid, Borg-Warner overdrive with synchro 2nd & 3rd, cruise speed 65-70, mechanical brakes (all Pierces) with vacuum booster, wheelbases 139 and 144. depending on body style.

 

* 133 = 1929 8-cylinder, 366 cid, 133-in wheelbase, cruise speed 55-60, no synchro (crash box)

Edited by Grimy
fixed spelling (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you, Grimy. That is a start. I have looked around the P-A society website and I certainly agree with you. I t will keep me busy for a long time. I ad mit I was trying to take a shortcut.  From the list of cars you own I would surmise you know you're way around Pierce Arrows. You even have a couple of the models I had on my list o f suspects.  Is your 1601 your favorite driver (if it is a driver)  since it has over drive & synchro and a higher cruise speed  ?  Thanks again.   I am concerned about parts available, as seems the case with the more rare cars like Auburn, Franklin, Marmon.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

George gave you a good rundown of the models.  But I would urge you to join the Pierce Arrow Society and go to some meets.  Make friends, it will be easy.

 

There’s one thing to learn the models, there’s another thing to understand what is a good car. That takes time and relationships.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, scatcat2018 said:

Thank you, Grimy. That is a start. I have looked around the P-A society website and I certainly agree with you. I t will keep me busy for a long time. I ad mit I was trying to take a shortcut.  From the list of cars you own I would surmise you know you're way around Pierce Arrows. You even have a couple of the models I had on my list o f suspects.  Is your 1601 your favorite driver (if it is a driver)  since it has over drive & synchro and a higher cruise speed  ?  Thanks again.   I am concerned about parts available, as seems the case with the more rare cars like Auburn, Franklin, Marmon.

I have very limited time this morning since I'm *driving* my 1930 roadster to San Jose (90 mi roundtrip) for the annual pre-WW2 (only) car show at History Park.  My focus for 25+ years has been to buy an older restoration, a "touring restoration," or a not-quite-complete restoration that (1) is good enough to be accepted for a regional showfield without caring about winning and (2) reliable to drive.  I chased my 1918 dual valve for 18 years before I was able to buy it in 2016 and it's my current favorite (the thrill of actually getting it hasn't worn off, and I've driven it 8,000 miles in 6-1/2 yrs)--but they are like kids, in that they are all different and we love their differences.

 

A long-deceased friend had a 1925 Series 80 4-passenger coupe and a 1936 1601 sedan, both of which I acquired, and those two seemed to strike the perfect balance for (1) earlier car for backroads but not highway capable except for short periods, and (2) long distance touring (I drove my 1936 from SF Bay Area to Cleveland solo in 3 days driving time--but I was younger then).  Pierce-Arrow Society has **superb** tech support (free download of owners manuals, 60+ years of "service bulletins" (tech info) digitized for free download, and a forum that's a miniature version of this one where you can ask questions and get responses in real time.  Our annual meets are outstanding with 3 days of touring followed by a judged show.  The 2022 meet was in Buellton CA and 2023 in Glens Falls NY.  AND... memberships are 12 months not calendar year--join today and your membership lasts to 9/17/23.

 

Join PAS, join your local region and show up for events and take rides.  Find out what spins your beanie or floats your boat.  At our annual meets, we encourage those who brought cars to fill up available seats with those who didn't, and some of my best friends in PAS are those who gave me rides or I gave them rides.  Probably half of offered P-As are offered FIRST within the Society.

 

You absolutely have to be a PAS member to find parts.  Our Museum has commissioned a number of reproductions.

 

Gotta go right now, back tonight or tomorrow.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...