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1937 Plymouth Woodie Wagon


Zakman
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Hello, I need to get smart, i just bought 1937 Plymouth Woody and not sure which Plymouth repair manual would give me the most info to restore this car along with its engine and transmission. Car was purchased with engine and tranny removed and everything that goes onto the motor.

So looking for guidance on finding a good repair manual for the car and motor.

Any help would be appreciated.

1664778762_Plym2(2).jpg.2a7eb59e2bb5f87ca0e5ff0b053d51d3.jpg

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Thanks again for finding all this info

Very much appreciated and will help me along with getting it back on the road again.

I know that i will be needing some engine odds and ends. For one, missing about 1/2 of the brass exhaust/intake nuts and the water fitting that is located on the back of the cyl head just above the water temp sensor. 

Zak

 

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The “T” most likely means Dodge truck engine.  My 1937 Dodge pickup was T38-xxxxxx.  You might want to clean up the engine serial number stamping to decode the engine you have.  Dodge was 217ci and Plymouth was 201ci in 1937.

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Cantrell of Huntington, NY built some station wagon bodies on Chrysler products in that era . They had a decal that usually was mounted on the interior ceiling above the rear seat on the inside roof area. They advertised heavily in the society magazines of that era as the main purchasers of those wagons ( a wagon to go to the station -  train station)  would buy one for the staff to use on their estates.

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Nice find, Zak!  Good luck with your new woodie project.  Please keep us posted with photos and updates as you progress thru the restoration...  Greg

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3 hours ago, Zakman said:

The engine number is T510  14638 the best i can make out.

Look here-->https://www.t137.com/registry/help/otherengines/otherengines.php

Very possible the engine was changed in the last ~85 years

What is the length of the head?

 

What is the wheel base?  Measure both sides

Edited by 1939_Buick (see edit history)
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What a nice start,  You need to join the Plymouth Owners club, It will save you money.  Several members own 37 wagons and they have a technical director that knows his stuff.  There are still a lot of Plymouth parts around at a reasonable cost. Keep us posted. 

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Your vehicle is a Westchester Suburban built by U.S. Body and Forging Co. which moved from Tell City to Frankfort, Ind. after suffering a destructive Ohio River flood in January 1937. It cost $740 in standard form and they built 602 of them.  STANDARD EQUIPMENT INCLUDED, forward spare wheel mounting, safety glass windshield, and weather curtains for all doors and windows, but safety glass could also be ordered for the doors and rear glass. The 8-passenger body had 4 side doors, but a choice of rear-end openings was offered. Beside the usual tailgate with lift gate above, there was a combination of tailgate and two swinging doors above. Also, two full length doors in the manner of a panel delivery were available. Courtesy from The Plymouth and DeSoto Story by Don Butler.

I have a Plymouth Passenger and Commercial Car Master Parts List and that engine number is nowhere to be found. A 1937 vehicle is designated as either a P3, P3X or P4, P4X. Serial numbers are as follows,

P3 1184001-1237460, 9085551-9097493, 3101401-3105159, 9376676-9381157

P3X 1184001-1237460

P4 10101001-10468044, 9190021-9199074, 9950001-9999000, 3162501-3205879, 9339691-9349561

P4X 10101001-10468044

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Just looked into another Mopar source and Commercial Cars for 1937 were designated PT50 and PT50X with these serial numbers:

8850101-8861664

9206601-9208113

9182701-9185188

Just checking some PT50 engine part numbers with Dodge truck numbers I could not find common part engine numbers. So it looks like Plymouth engines and Dodge engines are engineered differently. Usually I have found that if a part is common to other Chrysler models the part number does not change in the older car parts books. I think it is later on into the 50's when you start seeing superseded numbers. So you will need to find a Plymouth Master Parts Book and a Plymouth 1937 Service Manual for the chassis and engine that covers Commercial vehicles along with regular cars and trucks. If you can find a Plymouth Master Parts List with the red and yellow cover issued on July 1, 1939 it covers PT50 and PT50X and has blow up pictures that may help. Volume 2 has the most info. Volume 1 only has 27 pages pertaining to PT50 Body parts and most of your body parts if not all were supplied by U.S. Body.                     

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Your post was unclear.  Either this woody came without the drivetrain, or it came with the drivetrain, but not installed.  If you are missing the drivetrain, you will probably have to find a parts car or truck.  Because there are many, many parts other than just the engine block and the tranny that you will need, such as the clutch linkage, brake linkage, shift linkage, etc.  Great coach  though.  Wood looks like it's good to go!

 

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Zackman, I would suggest that you join the National Woodie Club. There are three, 1937 Plymouth Station Wagon's listed in the directory.  The wood on your Wagon looks like it's in pretty good shape, what plans do you have for your Wagon? PS, there is a National Woodie Club site listed under "Other Vehicle Category". 

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