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Paying it forward


yachtflame
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 I’m restoring a 1930 GarWood 28’ speedboat among a few other projects. I wanted something unique for the bland ignition and I found a photo of a 1927 Buick ignition switch with two levers. What a gorgeous switch!

 I placed a notice on the Parts Wanted for one of these switches. A member here, Tom Young contacted me and said he had one to spare and if I paid the shipping, he’d send me one. It arrived a few days later and what a beauty it is!

 THANK YOU Mr. Young!!

Because of his generosity, I have sent items to two people looking for 1930 Cadillac parts for free. I feel I have a lot to catch up for with this wonderful switch.

 This club is great as are the members! It makes me feel good that in a time where everyone seems to be chasing the almighty dollar, there are still people like this out there!

 

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You are a lucky person to have someone do that for you and a kind person to do it for others. I feel I have been as lucky with members of this forum helping me with problems and sharing their knowledge and abilities in the old car world. Hopefully more people will feel the joy also. 
dave s 

ps- pics of the Garwood would be appreciated. 

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The project is stalled at the moment. I’m also working on a 1949 Jaguar MK V. Then my wife and I caught a weird variant of Covid which had us in bed for 15 days and another 12 days trying to gain enough strength to shop for food. I’ll post a photo of the boat in its current condition. It’s upside down in my shop getting a new bottom of three 1/4” layers of mahogany epoxied together. Next week I turn it over and start on the sides.

D93EB7B9-7160-4700-9E8A-01BD722D216A.jpeg

Edited by yachtflame (see edit history)
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Glad you and your better half are ok. Nice work on the bottom. I did the side of a 42’ 1948 Cris Craft back in the seventies. Hand did the screws and by the time I was finished I would arm wrestle anyone for a cold beer!  Keep the pics coming as it is a very good looking boat. What engine are you putting in it? 

dave s 

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WONDERFUL so glad you are posting this, it will make all the people here with the " woes of woodwork" have sympathy for a fellow squirrel who is also dealing with sawdust, splinters etc. Hummmmm doesn't the guy on the NCIS tv show have a boat in his basement he was working on and then completed ........Wood boats, wood cars, WOOD IS GOOD!

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Now that boat looks like an ambitious project, and I am a woodworker by trade! 

I love the pay it forward. I too try to help people out when I can. I have given parts to people in the past and asked they send me what they think its worth if anything.

 

52346607809_932a1db553_c.jpg2022-09-09_07-56-11 by Kerry Grubb, on Flickr

Sorry for the hijack, but since you like boats.... I was with a buddy on the Ches Bay a few years ago and this Chris Craft was anchored beside us. I am certain it was wood and it looked fairly old to me. I think this is one beautiful boat!

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Happiest day of my boating life was when I bribed the gas guy on the dock to fill my two 60 gallon tanks during the gas crisis. Then I advertised the 42 foot CC for sale with full tanks and a low price. It sold quickly. 
otherwise I was going to sink the damn thing. 
dave s 

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10 hours ago, SC38dls said:

Glad you and your better half are ok. Nice work on the bottom. I did the side of a 42’ 1948 Cris Craft back in the seventies. Hand did the screws and by the time I was finished I would arm wrestle anyone for a cold beer!  Keep the pics coming as it is a very good looking boat. What engine are you putting in it? 

dave s 

I have an original model (not matching numbers) Chrysler straight 8 which would push the boat to about 28 mph. There were three more models. A Straight 6 Kermath which would make it go 32-35, then a Scripts 8 to go 45 then an Allison marinized V-12 aircraft which would make it go 50-55.

 I’m putting a 454 in it which I’m hoping for 45-55 mph. We’ll see!

Edited by yachtflame (see edit history)
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8 hours ago, Walt G said:

WONDERFUL so glad you are posting this, it will make all the people here with the " woes of woodwork" have sympathy for a fellow squirrel who is also dealing with sawdust, splinters etc. Hummmmm doesn't the guy on the NCIS tv show have a boat in his basement he was working on and then completed ........Wood boats, wood cars, WOOD IS GOOD!

Walt, there are days where I’m working on one of my cars getting grease everywhere thinking that I’d rather be working on one of the boats and be clean. Then a couple days later while running some planks through the planer, I began wishing I was working on a car so I wouldn’t have saw dust in my ears.  In these situations one starts to think that the grass is always greener on the other side of the fence....until you realize it’s because the septic system is there!

Edited by yachtflame (see edit history)
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I can agree about the "what am I doing" thought when working on assorted projects. But deep down I think it comes to knowing that we are either preserving something, or playing it forward by creating something that carries on a tradition of craftsmanship centuries old, that if we don't do it the skill will be lost. Fancy name for that is "Preservationists" ( said by people who wear monocles, top hats and tuxedos) , better described as " guys who fix stuff". I am one of the latter.

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working on old boat/marine engines can be very similar ( pre war stuff) to old cars. Both my uncles on my mothers side lived on the north shore of long island in Glen Head. One worked for Grumman aviation but spent most of his time off regular work  working on engines in his garage at home - its how I learned a lot - started cleaning spark plugs at age 8 or 9. The other was the head mechanic/engine guy at Fife's shipyard in Glenwood Landing not far from Glen Head. He had tons of engines to rebuild work on, I got a tour of the place several times seeing "works in progress" I was very very impressed. He would point out to me similarities between marine and auto engines, parts etc. His two sons near my age had no interest , all this 60+ years ago. the place was loaded with wood hull boats in that era. thanks to all for the photos.

there is a car connection - the words "boat tail " to describe a cars body/coachwork.

Big connection here too for those of us who owned woodie station wagons - I remember refinishing the body on my 1941 Packard 120 woodie many times. The smell of spar varnish still lingers in the air.................

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