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Can Anyone Identify This Part?


karguy12
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I'm looking to identify this specific part circled in red. It is currently on a 1931 Pierce Arrow engine. I am wanting yo know if anyone has seen a similar part or knows the original application for this part. I have not seen this on any other Pierce Arrow engine I have seen in person or photos. 

 

box.JPG

IMG_8823.jpg

IMG_8824.jpg

Edited by karguy12 (see edit history)
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I am going to offer a wild guess. 

Looks like it has a shaft coming off the water pump,  there is a lever mechanism above that moves something. 

You also said you have not seen it on other PA engines.   

Seem like there were a number of fire engines make with PA engines.... this might be the drive mechanism for 

the siren. 

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Karguy12, may I ask what university is going to help and where you are located. I’m not a mechanical genius but have rebuilt a number of engines and would love to help with this project if you need and want it. 
dave s 

edit ps - I’m old and slow but like that goofy bunny I just keep going. 

Edited by SC38dls (see edit history)
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43 minutes ago, SC38dls said:

Karguy12, may I ask what university is going to help and where you are located. I’m not a mechanical genius but have rebuilt a number of engines and would love to help with this project if you need and want it. 
dave s 

edit ps - I’m old and slow but like that goofy bunny I just keep going. 

Right now I have only a tentative offer to assist in the aerodynamic study. It is based on a students doctorate thesis on the history of aerodynamics in automotive design. I would not want to jinx it, as he and I are so far excited about the project. 

I would love help, technical assistance, advice, parts scavenging or anything that gets me closer to seeing this thing back on the road. 

  

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57 minutes ago, Barney Eaton said:

I am going to offer a wild guess. 

Looks like it has a shaft coming off the water pump,  there is a lever mechanism above that moves something. 

You also said you have not seen it on other PA engines.   

Seem like there were a number of fire engines make with PA engines.... this might be the drive mechanism for 

the siren. 

The mechanical lever does not seem to have any connection to the aluminum box. 

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1 hour ago, Avanti Bill said:

Looks like a tach drive to me.

That is what I always thought as well. So, then the question is what was the original application? Did PA's have tachs and if so, what were their mechanisms like? 

Or was it hand fabricated to allow the aircraft tach in the dash to operate accurately? 

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Tach drive sounds like a good guess.  There should be a set of reduction gears inside the box.  Hopefully, the box won't crumble when you take it off the water pump.  I don't think the original water pump cover was drilled through for the shaft as the drawings only show one gland nut at the drive end.  I assume the cover was drilled, the shaft extended, and a seal installed.

 

The lever assembly above it was probably for an older-style starter where the driver pushed a pedal just behind the floor shift to mechanically engage the starter, before the adoption of the Bendix drive gear.  Your pictures seem to show a more-modern starter.  Alternatively, the levers are for a hand-throttle cross-shaft linkage to go around the back of the engine to the carb. 

 

Here are drawings from the 1928-30 Studebaker President Service Reference Library, reprint available from Faxon Auto Literature.  There were some changes in the engines between 1928 and 1931, particularly separating the transmission and bell housing and going from 5 main bearings to nine bearings. The Pierce 366 straight 8 and Studebaker 337 straight 8 are essentially the same engine, no matter what the Pierce guys may say.  A parts interchange list for the cars was published by Bill Cannon in the Antique Studebaker Review, Jan. 1983.

 

1290426252_Presidentstarterlinkage.jpg.07cdb3bdfd3a398120ff43581f822b9c.jpg

Starter pedal  (B) and linkage.

 

1113998721_Presidentwaterpump.jpg.11f5c16fa20f5b0afde7adcbc6af1183.jpg

Water pump on straight 8 engine.

 

 

Edited by Gary_Ash (see edit history)
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