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r.pm. for setting timing on a 1936 Dodge D2


Cratchet
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I suspect the specs are the same as for the 1936 Plymouth. The base timing is done statically (i.e. with engine off). From the 1936-1942 Plymouth factory service manual:

 

Ignition Timing (static): 4° A.T.D.C.

 

Mechanical advance:

0° at 350 RPM

3° at 400 RPM

6° at 950 RPM

9° at 1500 RPM

11° at 1850 RPM

 

Vacuum advance:

2° with 6 3/4 in. of vacuum

11° with 14 in. of vacuum.

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21 hours ago, Rusty_OToole said:

As long as the centrifugal advance and vacuum advance are not activated. Usually this means a slow idle with vacuum disconnected. On your motor it is easy to check timing with the engine stopped. I can explain how if you wish.

 

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20 hours ago, ply33 said:

I suspect the specs are the same as for the 1936 Plymouth. The base timing is done statically (i.e. with engine off). From the 1936-1942 Plymouth factory service manual:

 

Ignition Timing (static): 4° A.T.D.C.

 

Mechanical advance:

0° at 350 RPM

3° at 400 RPM

6° at 950 RPM

9° at 1500 RPM

11° at 1850 RPM

 

Vacuum advance:

2° with 6 3/4 in. of vacuum

11° with 14 in. of vacuum.

 

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I have always checked the timing with the motor running and the vacuum advance hose plugged. I mark the 4 A.T.D.C. on the crankshaft pulley and rotate the distributor until it coincides with the timing light. Is that the same in a sense? I'm not quite sure what you mean. Call me dense I guess.

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For static timing, engine is off. Rotate engine to location points should open (happens to be TDC on my older Plymouth, 4° ATDC on yours). Once points are properly gapped, attach a trouble light or ohm meter  between the points and ground (I use one that beeps on zero ohm). Rotate the distributor to the location where the points just open. Lock the distributor down.

 

If you have a timing light with the ability to check advance, then attach it and a tach/dwell meter and with the vacuum line plugged check the mechanical advance curve. The expected values will be the advance degrees at the RPM minus the static setting. For the Plymouth listed above:

 

0° at 350 RPM - 4° ATDC static = -4°

3° at 400 RPM - 4° ATDC static = -1°

6° at 950 RPM - 4° ATDC static = +2°

9° at 1500 RPM - 4° ATDC static = +5°

11° at 1850 RPM - 4° ATDC static = +7°

 

Now with the engine at a fixed RPM, attach a vacuum pump/gauge to the distributor and check the vacuum advance curve. The spark should advance by the expected amount:

 

2° with 6 3/4 in. of vacuum

11° with 14 in. of vacuum.

 

If either the mechanical or vacuum advance differs from the expected then you have a problem to address.

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Ply 33 beat me to it. I would only add a couple of details. If you do not have a 6Vtest light you can set timing with a cigarette paper. Trap the paper between the points,  slowly rotate the distributor until it pulls free, that is the moment the points open. When the points open the coil fires.

 

There is one other feature on Chrysler, Plymouth, Dodge, DeSoto and Dodge truck flathead sixes. That is, there is a small pipe plug on the head directly above the #6 piston. You can remove the plug and drop a screwdriver down on the piston and tell exactly when you reach top dead center as you slowly turn the engine by hand. This allows you to time the engine even without the timing marks as the #1 and #6 piston rise and fall together.

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