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1958 Chevrolet convertible Barn Find


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I'm really not interested in opinions on barn finds, I'm more interested in wondering if this is for real or not.

No engine, transmission, radiator, driveshaft, or front seat, but there's a 348 tri-power that goes with the sale. Where is the value in this sale? The engine or the car? I would have guessed the car would be worth half that if it were complete and maybe even with the possibility it could start and run. Have values of '58 Chevrolet convertibles gone ballistic recently?

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/265805392272?mkcid=1&mkrid=711-53200-19255-0&siteid=0&campid=5338111750&customid=547394&toolid=10001&mkevt=1

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West:

Deciphering that VIN must reveal something rare and special about this '58 Impala convertible.  That's the only plausible explanation I can come up with for 110 bids and the $58K so far.

Steve

Edited by 58L-Y8
syntax corrected (see edit history)
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I thought I was the only person who prefers the gaudy looks of the 58 over the more popular tri-5.  This car is valuable because :

 

1 - It is an authentic barn find because it still retains it's authentic barn find dust.

2 - The successful bidder can verify it's barn find authenticity by being the first to pull it out of the barn.

C - It comes with an iconic 348 Tri-power motor that doesn't appear to be original to the car (unless someone knows something). My bet is that it will end

       up with a LS anyhow, along with other chassis mods.

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First time I have ever seen someone do an ad like that where they said the buyer can back out if the car is pulled out and doesn't meet the buyer's approval.  Now it's just a game of sport and you don't have to take it if you win it,  You just get to be the first guy to have dibs and walk when you find out it's a rusty piece of crap. 

I see this getting bid to 100 grand easy.   After all what do you have to lose,  even if you never had any intention of buying it. I bet it goes high,  the buyer doesn't take it, the next few bidders don't and it eventually sells in the 25-30 range if it isn't rusty.  Maybe a little more if it's not in too bad of shape and alot can just be cleaned up. 

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Probably a few shill bidders involved...  Why?  When you can walk away is the great mystery...  Do these routinely break $100K at Mecum/BJ/etc...?

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2 hours ago, 63RedBrier said:

Probably a few shill bidders involved...  Why?  When you can walk away is the great mystery...  Do these routinely break $100K at Mecum/BJ/etc...?

Restored ones can break 100G Not sure where the top really is but a wild guess would be around 125-150G unless it's got some real rare engine tranny option and or other provenance.  Now remember that is basically for a Number 1 car.  Which this could be for around 150G once you buy it if it turns out to be a pretty decent car.

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$58K with 2 days to go...  Can the buyer get $150k at auction after a full nut & bolt/body off frame restoration?  Can they bring this car to #1 condition for $92K or less?

 

2 hours ago, auburnseeker said:

Restored ones can break 100G Not sure where the top really is but a wild guess would be around 125-150G unless it's got some real rare engine tranny option and or other provenance.  Now remember that is basically for a Number 1 car.  Which this could be for around 150G once you buy it if it turns out to be a pretty decent car.

 

Edited by 63RedBrier (see edit history)
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Could be they were told it is the car from American Graffiti and no one else knows the true story so they believe they have the inside track to make a mint by washing and waxing it then selling it at auction. They got so excited they missed the fact it doesn’t have an engine or trans and is the wrong color. 
dave s 

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Seems this guy has bought mostly auto parts on eBay but has never sold there.

I am surprised at how hi the bids are, but it is a 58 and it is a convertible. (I might add that I am not a fan of the tri's)

The right to walk is rare, but I think someone will likely put this car back together.

Had alot of fun tooling around in my buddies 58 vert in high school.

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A while back an acquaintance of mine bought a barn full of non -titled hoarded cars that were stashed away since the 70's. Before he had official ownership He was trying to talk me into buying a '65 Eldorado convertible that he didn't want to keep. I declined; I had no way to inspect the underside and was wary of dirt floor rust and damp conditions for 25-30 years. Lo and behold, that Caddy broke in half with the first pull. Same fate for a Chevy Nomad and others that were "Pre-Sold". I'm happy I didn't jump at that "bargain opportunity".

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dog·ma
/ˈdôɡmə/
 
noun
noun: dogma; plural noun: dogmas
  1. a principle or set of principles laid down by an authority as incontrovertibly true
     
     
    The longer I live, read the forum, ad generally observe the more often I give a little laugh and think how much dogma surrounds the old car hobby. Many of you focus on the idea of that car being a completed restoration and the time, expense, and overall effort to do that. Maybe that will happen, maybe not. I am sure there are many whom would have just walked away from the mess and beamed with good judgement.
    I got into the hobby in 1959, still have the first Rod & Custom magazine my aunt bought me. It is on the shelf over my garage coffee bench. If it was Motor Trend or an early Hemmings the magazine could easily have "letters to the editor" or an editorial making all the same statements. And the readers intently absorbing the philosophy of how to think.
    I remember the gnarly withered old man pointing his palsied finger at me and saying those things. Not because I learned from him or agreed. I was probably the idea of him imposing his values on me. And my resistance to him. Still do that.
     
    Sport selling, I love the term. I started using it and doing it when I was in High School. It was derived from another term my friends used.
     
    Like the guy on the train in The Music Man said "He doesn't know the territory!".
     
     
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