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I am exploring options for a cement garage floor. I painted a floor with a Home Depot recommended paint. That looked good for a couple of months and then peeled.

I am looking for recommendations and flooring success stories. Thanks 

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On my 3rd shop and I clean up spills but figure the stains give it character. Second shop the mason recommended a sealer to be put on soon after it dried, which I did, not sure if it did anything but it was clear and didn't stop stains.

 

PS: if you really want nice floor and willing to spend the money look into Terrazzo flooring. Two friends put it on their shop floors. Looked great and as far as I know it has held up well. Not cheap.

Edited by Jim Bollman (see edit history)
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  • 2 weeks later...

Eight years ago I coated my new floor with two part Epoxy Coat.  Commercial estimate was $ 4 per sq ft at that time.  My cost was about $0.50 per sq ft.  It has held up well except for one small area where brake fluid leaked on it.  Look at the Garage Journal Forum for current information.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Six years ago I had a new house built, stretched the 2 car garage a little, to where it is 500 square feet. The previous house, built in 2004, had a two car garage and before moving into the garage I clear coated the floor with something from Lowe's or Home Depot. It worked okay as the clear coat helps to keep the dust down as cement seems to continue to dry out and create dust which affects the cars and tracks into the house; lived there 12 years and the clear coat held up okay but was giving up. So back to the current house and garage floor. I wanted something better than clear coat so I bought the DIY epoxy kits from Home Depot. I bought 3 kits which was plenty for 500 square feet. The cement was new, it had cured a few weeks, so I swept the floor and proceeded to put down the gray epoxy covering, I also sprinkled the "fairy dust" which is to help create a skid resistant texture. I do some work in the garage, brake jobs, oil changes, and so on, but the garage is mainly for two garage queen vehicles. So far the covering has held up very well, I do mop it sometimes, but overall it has done an excellent job and it keeps the cement dust down to zero. Also there are two rows of cement blocks around the bottom of the walls, I painted them with two coats of cement paint and that has held up perfectly, also keeping the dust in check. The garage is also insulated, drywalled and painted, and a "split system" for cooling and heating. NOW, for a home garage I recommend these epoxy kits (not for a business) as I mentioned but if you are going to do it yourself okay, but have someone help you mix the epoxy and use a brush for edging and to move the mixed epoxy along as it cures quickly. I waited at least 5 days or so before moving my things and cars into the garage. I did my floor by myself, wore me out, but overall it came out pretty good and is holding up great after six years.

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 I carpeted my garage floor with a short pile carpet.

 A good vacuuming every once in a while keeps the sand out.

 Eventually oil would creep up. so a good scrubbing is in order.

 I finally had to replace it as my back would get dirty from the oil that would not all come out.

 The advantage of carpet is first, it is great for kneeling on and laying down without a creeper. Second, it tremendously quiets the shop. Third it is nice and warm on your back.

 I sand bondo, weld and change parts on it all the time.

 Used carpet is not hard to fine for replacement.

👍

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I used sherwin Williams 2 part industrial epoxy with 2 coats of Rexthane clear coat. Nothing touches it . Hot tires , oil, gas, whatever else you can think of. Did it  9years ago and still looks brand new . I worked with my local sherwin Williams salesman and he really steered me in the right direction 

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On 9/5/2022 at 11:31 AM, Roger Walling said:

 I carpeted my garage floor with a short pile carpet.

 A good vacuuming every once in a while keeps the sand out.

 Eventually oil would creep up. so a good scrubbing is in order.

 I finally had to replace it as my back would get dirty from the oil that would not all come out.

 The advantage of carpet is first, it is great for kneeling on and laying down without a creeper. Second, it tremendously quiets the shop. Third it is nice and warm on your back.

 I sand bondo, weld and change parts on it all the time.

 Used carpet is not hard to fine for replacement.

👍

 

I did the same in my shop near Flint.  It is a lot warmer in the winter too.  I got the carpet from friends & family that was upgrading the carpet in their homes.  A lot of it like bedroom carpet is barely used. 

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)
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  • 1 month later...
15 hours ago, kejoxof said:

Hello. We are in the middle of renovating our very 60s home. We have a huge 4 car garage which is around 70sm that is currently all tiled in tiny brown Metalic mosaic tiles!! Basically was after a cost effective and practical solution that could cover the tiles and still look nice because I hate the tiles. We have looked into basically ever "epoxy" type concrete and have been advised to stay away as it doesn't do well on top of tiny tiles like these. Concreting would cost a bomb. We have also looked into "polyurea" type coatings, they look amazing but again have got quotes around the 10k mark because of the size and prep work involved in the area. And I really don't want to fork out 10k on a garage floor. Why couldn't they just leave it as concrete!! So much easier. Anyways just wanted to see if anyone had any ideas, suggestions or perhaps have had some luck with covering tiles successfully. Thanks guys.

Sorry, don't have any easy and inexpensive solution; sounds like you have checked into all the possibilities to change the floor. Maybe the snap together tiles (some type of plastic or whatever they're made of), and the tiles are typically one foot square or so, and those would sit on top of the mosaic tiles. That may not be a cheap solution, but it would be less labor intensive, especially if one of the fixes would be to scrape up the tiny brown tiles and resurface the concrete so an epoxy coating could be applied. Good luck with solving this one.

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  • 1 month later...

acid staining then sealer.  You can make the floor look like any color marble you want as the acid reacts with the different minerals in the cement. It cannot peal because the acid stain etches the concrete. The pattern you see is natural and occurs on it's own as the acid reacts with the way the minerals settle into the cured concrete. 100's of choices in colors. Not that expensive either.  No two floors are the same because of that  Acid-Stained-cola-coffee-brown-desert-amber-garage-floor-scaled.jpgOutdoor concrete stain, Stained concrete, Patio stain

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  • 1 month later...
On 7/31/2022 at 8:44 AM, Den41Buick said:

I am exploring options for a cement garage floor. I painted a floor with a Home Depot recommended paint. That looked good for a couple of months and then peeled.

I am looking for recommendations and flooring success stories. Thanks 

Just saw this. I chose a professionally installed polyurea surface for a 25 y/o concrete garage in the Chicago area (so lots of temperature fluctuations). It has held up well in 2 - 3 years I've had it. The garage is also insulated and drywalled but not heated. Epoxy surfaces are less expensive but the concensus was that they do not hold up as well in this environment.

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How do these floor coatings hold up to welding, cutting & grinding when hot metal or sparks hit them? What about steel wheeled equipment, will it chip the floor? I'm going to pour an addition to my shop in March so I would have a nice clean floor do coat or seal. 

 

Thanks Jim

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 8/1/2022 at 2:30 AM, Bills Auto Works said:

The Epoxy I have had on my shop floor for 18 years, I cannot recommend, because the company went out of business. It was called Ryzel. After 10 years, a few of the areas that I gouged started peeling. Keep in mind though that my shop gets much more abuse than one of a hobbyist, as this is a business. The owner was an older gentleman & I have a feeling he probably passed. After seeing the floors of two of my customers that used the Epoxy from Gratiot, I bought $1100.00 worth to do the addition on my building 3 years ago, but because of my transporting schedule, it is all sitting in my mixing room waiting to be put down!😁

   There is a big difference between the stuff Home Depot recommends or Rustoleum floor paint & good quality 2 Part Epoxy with Clear! If you have the funds, you can have a company come in, pour & spread smooth a very thick Epoxy coating that will last forever. I watched it being applied to the floor of a body shop where I was delivering to one time. It was very thick & flowed out very well. At the time (15 years or so ago) it was $6000.00 for my 40X88 (before the addition) shop.

 

   Just like anything else....Surface preparation is the key!  Cleaning & Acid Etching the concrete properly is the most important thing.

 

God bless

Bill

garage flooring surprise az

 

Hello. this is a question about a garage floor. I have a 2 1/2 car garage, with a work shop and my 2 Corvettes. The floor is concrete, about 40 years old. It is stained, and has several cracks. A summer project I would like to do, is to either paint, seal, or cover this floor. noe the options 1) clean, seal, prime, and coat in Epoxy Paint 2) clean, seal, prime and use a garage flooring paint, not epoxy 3) use one of the many snap together floor system Now, for one I thought of. The floor is pretty level. What would you think of my covering the floor with Marine grade 4x8 3/4 inch plywood. Prime the plywood, and paint it? I never get water inside the garage in the 6 years I am here. I eliminate the crack fix, and sealing issues? What has anyone else on here done as far as this is concerned. thank you in advance.

Edited by yojivi (see edit history)
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  • 2 months later...

My cousin had a similar issue with his garage floor, and he ended up going with an epoxy coating that has held up really well. It's a bit more expensive than regular paint, but it's definitely worth it in the long run. Plus, it comes in a ton of different colors and finishes, so you can customize it to your liking. Another option could be to look into concrete stain - it won't peel like a paint can, and it also comes in different colors. By the way, I recently stumbled upon https://www.greasemonkeydirect.com/pages/abrasives, and they have a wide range of tools for all sorts of projects - including ones for prepping concrete floors before coating them. It might be worth checking out!

Edited by AlexaDuffy (see edit history)
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  • 2 weeks later...
On 9/3/2022 at 5:05 AM, Glen Andrews said:

Six years ago I had a new house built, stretched the 2 car garage a little, to where it is 500 square feet. The previous house, built in 2004, had a two car garage and before moving into the garage I clear coated the floor with something from Lowe's or Home Depot. It worked okay as the clear coat helps to keep the dust down as cement seems to continue to dry out and create dust which affects the cars and tracks into the house; lived there 12 years and the clear coat held up okay but was giving up. So back to the current house and garage floor. I wanted something better than clear coat so I bought the DIY epoxy kits from Home Depot. I bought 3 kits which was plenty for 500 square feet. The cement was new, it had cured a few weeks, so I swept the floor and proceeded to put down the gray epoxy covering, I also sprinkled the "fairy dust" which is to help create a skid resistant texture. I do some work in the garage, brake jobs, oil changes, and so on, but the garage is mainly for two garage queen vehicles. So far the covering has held up very well, I do mop it sometimes, but overall it has done an excellent job and it keeps the cement dust down to zero. Also there are two rows of cement blocks around the bottom of the walls, I painted them with two coats of cement paint and that has held up perfectly, also keeping the dust in check. The garage is also insulated, drywalled and painted, and a "split system" for cooling and heating. NOW, for a home epoxy flooring cincinnati I recommend these epoxy kits (not for a business) as I mentioned but if you are going to do it yourself okay, but have someone help you mix the epoxy and use a brush for edging and to move the mixed epoxy along as it cures quickly. I waited at least 5 days or so before moving my things and cars into the garage. I did my floor by myself, wore me out, but overall it came out pretty good and is holding up great after six years.

Hello. What are the most common issues that homeowners encounter when installing and maintaining garage flooring, such as bubbling, peeling, or staining, and how can these problems be prevented? What are some common mistakes to avoid when DIY installing garage flooring, and how can a professional installation help to ensure a more durable and long-lasting finish?

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