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premature wear of front tires


Mister Fab
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Hello all,

 

I had a flat tire problem during the weekend on my 67 and the two front tires are showing a big deterioration at the inside. ( tires dead in 3000 miles)

 

I knew I had problems in the direction and I already planned to rebuild the suspension during the winter. 

 

I ordered this kit, but are there any other parts I would have to check that are not included?

https://stores.a-resto-parts.com/products/1967-1968-buick-electra-riviera-wildcat-new-front-end-suspension-rebuild-kit.html

 

 

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ALL of you do yourselves a dis-favor by replacing ALL the parts with Cinesium replacements which will more than likely wear out BEFORE the good original parts will.

Actually get under there & learn how, educate yourself, to check the various components. Things like inner tie rods are more than likely good. Same with upper ball joints. I don't see an idler arm in the kit. Will likely need one of those.

ALL these parts are available locally at GOOD auto parts stores. 

Yes, they may be likely more costly, BUT, IF there's a problem it's as close as the store.

It has taken me YEARS but NAPA is finally changing over their line of thermostats to carry ONLY the fail-safe ones as we speak. When it fails it fails open.

How many engines have been fried because of a stuck/failed thermostat????

Just my thoughts.

 

Tom T.

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I really would like to go to a nearby store to do my shopping, but I live in France, and you can't find American cars parts there, and even less for 50 years old American cars.

Every time I order parts, it costs me an eye just for shipment cost, so I prefer to buy a kit than part by part.

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I saw you are from France and recognized that limited your shopping options. Since you have already ordered the kit you should be fine. I would closely check the condition of the original part to be replaced. If it shows little wear beyond the original specifications I would be inclined to keep it and set the replacement aside as a spare. The quality of the good original part would be high.

 

Kits can differ in quality. A couple of decades ago I found specialty vendors making up kits from obsolete or excess aftermarket parts. Many were put into plain brown boxes. Some of those were seconds. Machining of threads and surfaces was poor. I used some and soon learned to ask if the boxes had a manufacturer's name printed on them. I still avoid the brown box stuff.

 

Your best buy for future projects would be OEM or MOOG parts. I run an Ebay search notification for the part numbers when I am planning. There are good deals. Ebay has a worldwide shipping program that can be costly. Ebay has a fee for each part. If you find a vendor who has multiple parts you need ask them to assemble your parts into one sale to get only one fee. A person in Germany bought a handful of car show dash plaques from me. Since they were individual sales the fees totaled around $300. I canceled the sales and listed them as a group and he didn't get hurt too bad.

 

Many Chinese products are subsidized to compensate the manufacturer for higher quality at a competitive price in the world market. The high line products are good. On the tool side I have been buying Icon tools at Harbor Freight, hard to tell from Snap On. Some stuff is junk no matter where it comes from. Some is priced with an ulterior motive. My choice is to knowingly take advantage of that.

 

Edit. I really had to restrain from making a comment on the Toulouse Riviera front end.

 

Edited by 60FlatTop (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, telriv said:

May I suggest a search of stores in France???  This would save somewhat on shipping costs???

 

Tom T.

There are a few stores in France, but the price of the parts is 3 or 4 times the price you pay in the US.

The sellers in france take advantage on the fact that a lot of French people don't speak english and won't try to buy online.

Shipments are really expensive when leaving directly by plane to France.

Now I work with a french transport company installed in CA. The parts I order are shipped to their adress and they put them in a container.  It takes one month, but it is very economical.

 

Ex: disc brake kit shipped by POL to france: $1000 shipment 

    one palette of parts shipped by boat, including the brake kit, air conditioning evaporator + dryer, suspension rebuild kit and other part : $500 shipment 

 

And this is really the best calculated way to save money when you live in France

Edited by Mister Fab (see edit history)
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WOW!!!!   AND most in the USA think shipping is too costly.

I admire you guys being so dedicated & willing to spend the $$$$ & time nec. to accomplish these tasks.

 

Tom T.

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"Dead on the inside" equals too little toe-in or in this case toe-out. 

Our older cars take alot of toe-in because of the normally sloppy linkage, steering box, etc.

IF it had that much negative camber the tires would be tilted in at the top which IF that bad can just about be readily seen.

 

Tom T.

Edited by telriv (see edit history)
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Be careful about new springs and that negative camber. If the spring rate is different from the original the car will be high and sometimes you can see them slanted in at the top.

 

Coil Spring Specialties are what I have on the rear of my '64 Riviera. Back in 1988 I bought an inexpensive pair for the rear from J. C. Whitney. Those were replaced quickly because it was way too high. I used MOOG from NAPA on the front when I did the big job around 1994.

 

Not much adjustment in height with coil springs but the manual gives specific instructions for the rear on both installation and position of the tails.

 

There is sufficient space for camber shimming on the Riviera but it shouldn't take a lot.

 

I remember when we were young everyone thought they had to have air conditioned station wagon springs in their Chevies. A lot of messed up camber from that. And the wheels would hit the tar strips in the road with a bang that echoed through the hood. I have calmed down a few of those. Bigger is not better but it is hard to teach that.

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8 hours ago, telriv said:

IF that worn the joint would have separated already I'm sure.

The shop manual didn't mention that...  ;)

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