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1930 DeSoto CF 8cyl Rumble Seat Coupe w/Twin Side Mounts $10,000 Chippewa Falss, WI


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The only floor work I saw was wood.  That's a couple hour job.  Big question is the shape of the engine. In one photo the chrome looks toast on the outside,  but in the other looks much better.  Maybe it was just dirty in the one photo.  I agree seems like a good buy especially if you don't need to do a full engine rebuild.  Hydraulic brakes as well. Looks like a worn, but very serviceable interior.  Rumble seat needs some help,  but that's not a huge deal either.  

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Seems a heck of a deal! No major mechanical work is cheap these days, but these engines are relatively simple, should it be needed (says 
"close to running"). 

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I've looked at this car many times as it's the coupe version of mine. Being a coupe and the wire wheels makes it more desirable I would think. People might be leery of it being a DeSoto and parts availability however I didn't find it to be a big problem.  

Nice looking car with more room inside than a Model A.

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Interesting to think the corporate strategy, once DeSoto and Dodge-Brothers were offered as an inline 8-cyl option in 1930, but Chrysler, the top-of-line brand, used only flathead 6-cyl for the same year. 
The 8-cyl engine was only adopted by Chrysler 1931 year model.

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12 hours ago, JRA said:

Interesting to think the corporate strategy, once DeSoto and Dodge-Brothers were offered as an inline 8-cyl option in 1930, but Chrysler, the top-of-line brand, used only flathead 6-cyl for the same year. 
The 8-cyl engine was only adopted by Chrysler 1931 year model.

WPC was still sorting out his nameplate price structure which was to compete with the Sloan ladder as the Dodge purchase had suddenly bought models that were price parity with their current lines.   DeSoto initially was priced below or parity with Dodge and Dodge overlapped Chrysler.  The eight-cylinder models in the middle-price range cars below Chrysler was contrary to the order that was expected.  Chrysler's main competitor Buick didn't go all straight eight until 1931 either so had some 'cover' so to speak.  By 1933, WPC had it largely sorted out with the pecking order Plymouth-Dodge-DeSoto-Chrysler.  Poor DeSoto was essentially superfluous right from the start once Dodge was in the fold, the inside joke was it gave WPC's son-in-law Byron Foy something to do...

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9 hours ago, Boobtube said:

Probably not a popular opinion but I actually like less cylinders because of maintenance ease, costs, weight.

I agree with you especially since the science of making a well balanced and strong 8cyl. crankshaft didn't seem to be available to Chrysler at the time. I heard if you over rev these engines the crankshaft will start turning into a snake. I know the block near the center main bearing on this engine has been welded and I suspect high rpm's may have been the cause. Fortunately the other engine I have appears to have a beautiful block and internals. 

A well designed straight 6 cylinder is hard to beat for a good reliable engine. I actually toyed with the idea of installing a Chrysler slant (225 cu in.) 6 cylinder in this car as it will never be more than a good driver. 

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16 hours ago, Fossil said:

I agree with you especially since the science of making a well balanced and strong 8cyl. crankshaft didn't seem to be available to Chrysler at the time. I heard if you over rev these engines the crankshaft will start turning into a snake. I know the block near the center main bearing on this engine has been welded and I suspect high rpm's may have been the cause. Fortunately the other engine I have appears to have a beautiful block and internals. 

A well designed straight 6 cylinder is hard to beat for a good reliable engine. I actually toyed with the idea of installing a Chrysler slant (225 cu in.) 6 cylinder in this car as it will never be more than a good driver. 

That's probably why the big 8s Chrysler came out with for the Imperial had 7 main bearings. At the other end of the scale, Duesenberg and Miller both had 3 main bearing 8's in the early 20's that could hit over 5,000 RPM. I think they must have had a lot of extra clearance... 

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