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I have a 1929 peerless 6/60 sedan and was wondering how many are left


31 LaSalle
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Mr. LaSalle, questions like yours come up from time to time.

No one--repeat, no one--actually knows how many of 

various car models still exist.  Occasionally you'll see some

claims of people that say they know, but they do not.

 

Many clubs keep a roster of what cars are owned by their

members.  That will give a number of cars declared just by

those owners.  But that number is far from all-inclusive.

 

Also:  Cars in the U. S. A. are registered by each state.

In Pennsylvania, for example, it would be registered only as

a "1929 Peerless" with no record of the model.  So even if 

someone wanted to compile a number, he would have no way.

And cars in poorer condition may not be registered at all.

 

Conclusion:  Enjoy what you have.  There is at least one

aficionado on this forum, and he may be able to estimate

based on how many he's come across.  Have fun with your hobby!

 

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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  • Peter Gariepy changed the title to I have a 1929 peerless 6/60 sedan and was wondering how many are left

I once met a fellow that claimed to have two of only five left in the world (absolutely bible thumper swore he knew every one of them existing in the world!) of a specific body style 1925 Studebaker! One of his two was a nice original car, the other was barely a parts car. Problem was, that even fifty years ago when I met him and saw his two? I had already seen five others. Since then I have seen nearly a dozen more. 

Some people think they know everything. 

 

Some specific make and model cars there are reasonable estimates of existing cars. However, unless we are talking about certain specific custom ordered and built cars where research over the years has tracked the few and all are somewhat known?

 

I know of two cars that I knew thirty to forty years ago that were rare enough to be noticed, but have disappeared. And I have no idea where they went. One was a Kissel cabriolet that I fell in love with, and almost bought (the rumble seat was NOT a good idea for my then young family!). The other a Stearns Knight Brougham that a close friend had for a few years. Both cars, I have asked marque experts about, and apparently are not known today. 

How many other hundreds, maybe thousands, of noteworthy cars are hiding in private collections or lost hoards?

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31 Lasalle -

     Some very rare marques are well documented by owners clubs over the years, and in such cases it may be pretty reliable to believe that the rosters from such clubs are a close accurate representation of survivor cars. Our Kissel klub has been active for decades and we track known and once-known Kissel survivors. We track complete cars and parts-cars. So for us, those counts are pretty accurate. However, I know from experience that sometimes surprise barn-finds show up. 
     In my case, in 2007 when I was lucky enough to find and purchase my 1923 Kissel Model 6-45 Gold Bug, the roster said that three such cars including mine, were in existence. Yet in 2014, another identical unrestored car surfaced in a nearby shed in Owaso Michigan. I quickly overpaid and bought it. There are now four 1923 Kissel Gold Bug Mdel 6-45 cars in the Kissel roster.  
    I think you Peerless guys have a club and a roster of sorts. If it’s been overseen faithfully, you may be able to  approximate your vehicle’s rarity thru that listing.

    Good luck. 
    Ron Hausmann. P. E.

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Ron, I'm not sure of the year but pretty sure the Simeone has a Gold Bug, I assume you know about it.

For the Peerless I would almost think that 7% would be a good starting point, if not a tad bit high. And yes, I believe that no matter what vehicle is thought to be the only one, there is a good chance there is at least one hiding in a barn some place!

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The 6-60 was the low price Peerless for 1929. It used a 199 cid Continental 10E engine and had a base price of $1195. My production figure book says Peerless' total new registrations in 1929 were 8,318. I suspect it is likely that some of the 1930 registrations (4,021) were of leftover '29s. My serial number book says the 6-60 serial numbers went from B603,034 to B610,000 - just less than 7,000 units. I imagine about 80% of that would have been four door sedans. As Peerless quickly became an 'orphan' I doubt the survival rate is as high as other more 'common' models.

 

Btw all that info came from books I bought while in the US in 1978. I wonder how much of the info in those book has been disproven.

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Yes, and all my Fords all belonged to Henry Ford at one time.   That and $5.00 will get me cup of Coffee.  That award on the shelf is the coveted Starbucks Cup.   Plus they are the only ones exactly like it,  that I know of.  

P. S.   I really don't care how many are left, just so I can still find a 1934 Ford if mine are stolen or burned up.

Fifity years with 4 different 1934 Fords has made life enjoyable.   However the last time, I needed a new one,

it took 1 1/2 years to find and build the right one.   (By build I mean make it good enough for my uses)

I always stop to talk with other 34 Ford owners.

 

34 Tudor.jpg

Don's 34.jpg

Phaeton Falls - Copy.jpg

DSCI0214.JPG

Edited by Paul Dobbin (see edit history)
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Find the Peerless Club, join it and then work with them from there. Most people reading this do not know all the models and series of the Peerless cars, that is why single make car clubs were/are established. Some clubs started many years ago - this is true of the Pierce Arrow Society and the H.H. Franklin Club for the Franklin automobiles.

If anyone who belongs to the Peerless Club can contact you perhaps that is a start. I know the club's activity has been spotty on and off over the years depends upon who is enthusiastic and has the time and patience to devote to keeping rosters, information as to parts availability etc. 

I have been active in single make car clubs for 60+ years, and my enthusiasm depends upon others enthusiasm, cooperation and ability to listen and realize what may really be needed , opinions/attitudes can make or break a car club ( or any organization) , they can turn people on enthusiasm wise or totally off as well because of a demanding tone or nature. At least a dozen people I know and who know me are reading this and thinking - yep, he knows that from first person experience.

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Hi John. It's not easy finding reliable information on 157-year old car companies. Your Peerless is a circa 1929 Model Six-61. Only Peerless model with the horizontal louvers on the bonnet. I think Stutz, Blackhawk and Roosevelt cars had those in the same era, too. I'm a Peerless Motor Car Club member in spirit, though the Club is in a rather inactive phase with the death of longtime President and Newsletter Editor Richard Lichtfeld and earlier organizer David Baird. I'm the Historian..........and fortunately for you I've been working on the registry* of Peerlesses since 2007.

Lo, I looked at KPAIE and see that there are 55 1929s, 6 1930s, and 1 1931 Peerless 6-61 listed. Far more 1929 and 1927 Peerlesses are known to have survived than any other years. Many years are just represented by 1 or 2 examples. Peerless' 3 models in the 6-60 family were:

(remember, every jurisdiction has a different notion of what year a car is when registered[year built? year sold? year brought to the registration office?])

  • 1927 and 1928 6-60/199 cu. in./62 h.p./(1st Series)A400,501-A403,549 (2nd Series) B600,001-B603,991
  • 1929 6-61/215 cu. in./63 h.p. @3600 rpm/Car Ser. # C610,501-C615,450
  • 1930 6-61A/215 cu. in./C615,451-C619,507/really, the '29 6-61, but built after Sept. 1st, 1929, because of the model year break/some 6-61A cars have side cowl vents, fender running lights, and/or 10-spoke wheels



* The Known Peerless Automobiles In Existence list. KPAIE has 371 vehicles, with your 1929 added two days ago. An article in an investment magazine states that there are only 35 examples of Peerless motor cars remaining. I believe there are that many in Europe. This roster/registry/inventory/studbook** probably has some cars listed more than once, and will until serial numbers are provided for all of them. Some are just leads, some are well documented, and most are in between somewhere, but all have been photographed or written about since 1968. Are there more Peerless cars and trucks surviving than I put on this list? Of course. Maybe 20. Maybe 200.

** A French collector refers to it as that.

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, jeff_a said:

with the horizontal louvers on the bonnet. I think Stutz, Blackhawk and Roosevelt cars had those in the same era, too

Franklin had horizontal hood louvers for 1930 as well, one year only.

Thanks to Jeff Brown for giving us the wonderful information. GREAT. most welcome and appreciated.

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On 7/12/2022 at 5:12 AM, wayne sheldon said:

I once met a fellow that claimed to have two of only five left in the world (absolutely bible thumper swore he knew every one of them existing in the world!) of a specific body style 1925 Studebaker! One of his two was a nice original car, the other was barely a parts car. Problem was, that even fifty years ago when I met him and saw his two? I had already seen five others. Since then I have seen nearly a dozen more. 

Some people think they know everything. 

 

Some specific make and model cars there are reasonable estimates of existing cars. However, unless we are talking about certain specific custom ordered and built cars where research over the years has tracked the few and all are somewhat known?

 

I know of two cars that I knew thirty to forty years ago that were rare enough to be noticed, but have disappeared. And I have no idea where they went. One was a Kissel cabriolet that I fell in love with, and almost bought (the rumble seat was NOT a good idea for my then young family!). The other a Stearns Knight Brougham that a close friend had for a few years. Both cars, I have asked marque experts about, and apparently are not known today. 

How many other hundreds, maybe thousands, of noteworthy cars are hiding in private collections or lost hoards?

I am very amazed to see how frequently unknown 1920s cars still show up, from many marques. 

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15 hours ago, jeff_a said:

Hi John. It's not easy finding reliable information on 155-year old car companies. Your Peerless is a circa 1929 Model Six-61. Only Peerless model with the horizontal louvers on the bonnet. I think Stutz, Blackhawk and Roosevelt cars had those in the same era, too. I'm a Peerless Motor Car Club member in spirit, though the Club is in a rather inactive phase with the death of longtime President and Newsletter Editor Richard Lichtfeld and earlier organizer David Baird. I'm the Historian..........and fortunately for you I've been working on the registry* of Peerlesses since 2007.

Lo, I looked at KPAIE and see that there are 55 1929s, 6 1930s, and 1 1931 Peerless 6-61 listed. Far more 1929 and 1927 Peerlesses are known to have survived than any other years. Many years are just represented by 1 or 2 examples. Peerless' 3 models in the 6-60 family were:

(remember, every jurisdiction has a different notion of what year a car is when registered[year built? year sold? year brought to the registration office?])

  • 1927 and 1928 6-60/199 cu. in./62 h.p./(1st Series)A400,501-A403,549 (2nd Series) B600,001-B603,991
  • 1929 6-61/215 cu. in./Car Ser. # C610,501-C615,450
  • 1930 6-61A/215 cu. in./C615,451-C619,507/really, the '29 6-61, but built after Sept. 1st, 1929, because of the model year break/some 6-61A cars have side cowl vents, fender running lights, and/or 10-spoke wheels



* The Known Peerless Automobiles In Existence list. KPAIE has 371 vehicles, with your 1929 added two days ago. An article in an investment magazine states that there are only 35 examples of Peerless motor cars remaining. I believe there are that many in Europe. This roster/registry/inventory/studbook** probably has some cars listed more than once, and will until serial numbers are provided for all of them. Some are just leads, some are well documented, and most are in between somewhere, but all have been photographed or written about since 1968. Are there more Peerless cars and trucks surviving than I put on this list? Of course. Maybe 20. Maybe 200.

** A French collector refers to it as that.

I have had my peerless for about ten years and always thought it was a model 6/60

now thanks to dedicated people on this site like jeff a  I know it is actually a model 6/61 

don't no the difference  

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Make sure you are reading the AACA Peerless Forum here on the AACA Forums.............which has thousands of posts all about the various Peerless cars built between 1900 and 1931. There are about 96 forums here, you know, like Packard, Locomobile, What Is It, ACD, CCCA-General, Horseless Carriages, Marmon, Premier, and Stutz. Even some of the General Motors brands have their own forums, though not all.

Go to "AACA Peerless Forum" on Google, scroll down from the AACA Forums page, or go here:

 

https://forums.aaca.org/forum/84-peerless/

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On 7/12/2022 at 9:16 AM, 8E45E said:

Love it!!

 

I guess I'm not the only one who has done the same!

 

Craig

And then invested more money to restore and making it special, trying to confirm original buying assumption.

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1 hour ago, JRA said:

And then invested more money to restore and making it special, trying to confirm original buying assumption.

To be honest, confirmed it by purchasing a copy of the Production Order first!  I wanted to be sure it was the only one of its type that was sold new where I was born & raised!!

 

Craig

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On 7/13/2022 at 2:05 PM, jeff_a said:

Hi John. It's not easy finding reliable information on 155-year old car companies. Your Peerless is a circa 1929 Model Six-61. Only Peerless model with the horizontal louvers on the bonnet. I think Stutz, Blackhawk and Roosevelt cars had those in the same era, too. I'm a Peerless Motor Car Club member in spirit, though the Club is in a rather inactive phase with the death of longtime President and Newsletter Editor Richard Lichtfeld and earlier organizer David Baird. I'm the Historian..........and fortunately for you I've been working on the registry* of Peerlesses since 2007.

Lo, I looked at KPAIE and see that there are 55 1929s, 6 1930s, and 1 1931 Peerless 6-61 listed. Far more 1929 and 1927 Peerlesses are known to have survived than any other years. Many years are just represented by 1 or 2 examples. Peerless' 3 models in the 6-60 family were:

(remember, every jurisdiction has a different notion of what year a car is when registered[year built? year sold? year brought to the registration office?])

  • 1927 and 1928 6-60/199 cu. in./62 h.p./(1st Series)A400,501-A403,549 (2nd Series) B600,001-B603,991
  • 1929 6-61/215 cu. in./63 h.p. @3600 rpm/Car Ser. # C610,501-C615,450
  • 1930 6-61A/215 cu. in./C615,451-C619,507/really, the '29 6-61, but built after Sept. 1st, 1929, because of the model year break/some 6-61A cars have side cowl vents, fender running lights, and/or 10-spoke wheels



* The Known Peerless Automobiles In Existence list. KPAIE has 371 vehicles, with your 1929 added two days ago. An article in an investment magazine states that there are only 35 examples of Peerless motor cars remaining. I believe there are that many in Europe. This roster/registry/inventory/studbook** probably has some cars listed more than once, and will until serial numbers are provided for all of them. Some are just leads, some are well documented, and most are in between somewhere, but all have been photographed or written about since 1968. Are there more Peerless cars and trucks surviving than I put on this list? Of course. Maybe 20. Maybe 200.

** A French collector refers to it as that.

 

I found this really interesting, and loved the fact that a forum member knew so much.   Thanks for posting it.

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15 hours ago, 1935Packard said:

 

I found this really interesting, and loved the fact that a forum member knew so much.   Thanks for posting it.

I posted this as I have a peerless 6/60 sedan 

I was wrong seems I  have a peerless 6/61 sedan

goes to show the knowledge available on this forum great bunch of helpful people

 

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On 7/12/2022 at 7:31 AM, ron hausmann said:

I quickly overpaid and bought it.

According to self appointed advisers I have generally overpaid for most of my cars. The ones I overpaid the most for I kept. The less expensive overpays I sold. Overall I haven't lost a lot.

 

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