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1954 dodge meadowbrook


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Alright. So I had to replace the rear brake drum and studs on my 54 dodge meadowbrook. I got a new drum and studs from Craig at mobile parts. I'm sure you've heard of him, nice guy and seems very knowledgeable. But... the drum and studs are a little different from the original, hard to find originals though. The drum works just fine but instead of press in studs they are thread in and the threaded studs that look like this20220624_164347.jpg.9372de6d78272814b66340e43714e899.jpg20220624_164419.jpg.7341c33abe633b7a4e537ecf9332d7a5.jpgif I thread it in from the back, which is how most are and I've never seen anything different but obviously way to short. So my question is do they go in from the front through the wheels into the drum? I feel like thats not right. 20220624_164441.jpg.d602896151d0d0d815e8197ad5451eda.jpgthese are the originals 20220624_164502.jpg.e3fc807de40229ef7d64bcbb4ea5497d.jpg20220624_164512.jpg.ba6a281d9bf96d3e8834e785d16aa2ef.jpgso if someone could help me with that, that would be great. Not sure if I need different studs or what

20220624_164401.jpg

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Whoa!

 

You are working with two completely different  designed bolts.

 

The originals, are press in studs ; that would use a nut to hold the wheel.

 

The new bolt in your hand; holds the wheel on. 

 

Two completely different types of fasteners.

 

intimeold

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Yes, that’s the older style for MoPar with studs holding the wheel rim to the brake drum.  Perfectly normal arrangement.  The tapered shaft setup on the axle and brake drum with its locknut on the end make a quite secure attachment of the brake drum to the axle.  To that assembly the new wheel studs you show will attach the tire and wheel. Note how the head of the lug stud matches the taper of a lug nut.

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2 hours ago, plymouthcranbrook said:

Mopars of that era used bolts to hold the wheels on. 

I don't think this ^^ is exactly correct.

 

Most of the MoPars of that era ('30s to '60s) that I've owned (dozens) or worked on (dozens) originally have pressed-in (from inside) studs, not only to hold the drum on to the hub as they're separate parts, i.e. two-piece assembly, but also to provide mounting for the road wheels which are secured in place by tapered nuts.

 

The "new" drum in OPs pictures appears to be what I would call an aftermarket, one-piece (cheaper* to make) brake drum (with drum & hub casted together, so no studs required) and drilled + tapped for the use of tapered bolts to secure road wheels.

 

* Being that they appear to be cheaply made type (perhaps even "Made in C***a"), just make sure they're running true in all directions before attempting to mount and/or put to use. Any "built-in"(?) discrepancy may cause you chase your tail and possibly even misdiagnose any balance or out-of-round issues to be caused by tires or wheels.

Also, make sure road wheels center themself snuggly from the hub, not the lug bolts.

 

 

Edited by TTR (see edit history)
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My first car was a '56 Plymouth Savoy.Had lug bolts just like the OP photo,with LH threads on the driver side.It also had a tapered pin in each drum to help center the wheel over the lug bolt holes to help you get the wheel on.There were small holes between the lug bolt holes that the pin went through.

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Dodge was the only line of MoPar 40's 50's cars that used pressed in studs on drums as already noted.

Alex your picture of the pressed in studs from the backside of the drum is the original factory drum setup.

I have some funky 11" stud drums off a 54 Coronet I parted out years ago.

My 52 Dodge wayfarer cpe had 10" stud drums.

The chinese replacement drum drilled and tapped for bolts is probably all that's available new after market.

Probably should be checked on a brake lathe for running true.

Edited by c49er (see edit history)
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Awesome thanks everyone for the feedback! Much appreciated! I've own this car for just over a year now and starting to realize how hard it can be to find parts for these old mopars or information about them. Also well I'm here, does anyone know what to torque spec is for the studs?

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2 hours ago, alex54dodge said:

Awesome thanks everyone for the feedback! Much appreciated! I've own this car for just over a year now and starting to realize how hard it can be to find parts for these old mopars or information about them. Also well I'm here, does anyone know what to torque spec is for the studs?

Do them up the same as if they were nuts Tight 

 

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14 hours ago, plymouthcranbrook said:

All the old Mopars I had back in the 60’s(54 Plymouth and briefly a 53 Dodge) had bolts holding the wheels on.  I don’t remember ever seeing one from that time that did not.  And the drums on my current car are factory originals.  

 

13 hours ago, c49er said:

Dodge was the only line of MoPar 40's 50's cars that used pressed in studs on drums as already noted.

Alex your picture of the pressed in studs from the backside of the drum is the original factory drum setup.

I have some funky 11" stud drums off a 54 Coronet I parted out years ago.

My 52 Dodge wayfarer cpe had 10" stud drums.

The chinese replacement drum drilled and tapped for bolts is probably all that's available new after market.

Probably should be checked on a brake lathe for running true.

Reading these ^^ replies made me realize my experience extends mainly to higher line cars, mostly Chryslers & Imperials and some DeSotos (pretty much all w/12” drums w/studs & nuts instead of bolts) with only few Plymouths or Dodges sprinkled in between 20+ years ago.
Sorry about that.

 

Only extensive and more recent early Plymouth experience I have is with my PB Roadster, but only front brakes on it are stock and rear brakes (& entire rear axle), IIRC, scavenged from ‘51-‘52 Dodge STW(?), so not exactly greatest reference.

 

But come to think of it, I do have some (new and used) lug bolts with LH & RH threads in my spare parts inventory. Just can’t recall where from or why I got them.

 

 

Good topic, learned something useful. Thanks.

Edited by TTR (see edit history)
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