Jump to content

How rare is it? Studebaker Lark Wagonair Daytona V8


Recommended Posts

They may not be as rare as some other wagons, but from the time they were produced they have had a spirited following. Judging from what I'm seeing the car looks like it was garaged, and lightly used for much of it's life. I see very little of the rust that is generally apparent in the sliding roof area, trunk and guardedly maybe even the floors. The dash may even be salvageable. IMHO the car is worth the effort, and much better then a parts car.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The complete 11,915 1963 four door station wagon production included all model series within both the six- and eight-cylinder lines.  Those were Standard, Heavy-Duty, Regal, Custom and Lark Daytona.  No production breakout for only the eight-cylinder Lark Daytona Wagonaire is available.  It was the most expensive 1963 wagon at $2,835 fob. so likely on the lower numbers side.  While the sliding roof section is unique, they didn't turn out to be all that useful on a daily basis.  The downside was Studebaker wasn't able to work out the problems with roof leaks.

 

The two door station wagons ended with the 1961 model year.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Even if production of the high end wagon was 11,000+ I would think today they are indeed rare. I go to a lot of shows (albeit they are mostly local and more or less the same cars), read any car publication I can, and peruse the web mostly looking for/at cars and not sure that I have seen one of these in 10,000 cars.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

25 minutes ago, TAKerry said:

Even if production of the high end wagon was 11,000+ I would think today they are indeed rare.

 

Pretty much everything from sixty years ago is "rare" today - except for musclecars where 150% of the original production has survived. Don't confuse production rarity with survival rate.

  • Like 5
  • Haha 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The only thing that would make it rare is if it were a "full package" car, ordered with the "high performance" option with either a R1 or R2 engine.  This has neither and my advice is to run like the wind away from this project.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, 58L-Y8 said:

The downside was Studebaker wasn't able to work out the problems with roof leaks.

And with that, @58L-Y8 deserves some kind of award for "understatement of the year". 🤣  I was driving a 63 Daytona Wagonaire around Seattle in the early 90s. It looked so much like the one in the original post I did a double take until I saw the black interior. Yes, you can haul ridiculous things in it, and I did. Here is a side view of a Wagonaire I found online:

 

s-l1600.jpg

 

Note that the roof slides in some channels or rails. In fact, you can see one of them in white at the left rear of this car. Now imagine in your minds eye about how long those rails must be to accommodate the whole sliding roof. Those rails fill up with water. It can really surprise you how much water they hold. When you stop, all that water comes rushing forward and lands right in your lap.

 

Speaking of water, there is also this nifty feature:

 

286882168_161102689737143_61260030874474

 

Note that piece of trim that says "Daytona" on it. It gathers all the water that runs down the side of the car from the door back, as well as everything the drip rail collected from the roof, and drains all of it right on the gas filler. I hope that cap has a good gasket on it. :ph34r:

 

Speaking of Wagonaires, @Gary_Ash is restoring a 6 cylinder one, and his is looking really nice. I'd like another Lark-type someday but probably not another Wagonaire. A 66 Commander coupe or sedan with v8 and overdrive would sure pique my interest. My 63 Daytona Wagonaire had a 289 with one of the engine blocks that support a full flow oil filter. Those aren't laying around everywhere, as they were only made for about a year and a half. If the Wagonaire in the original post was made late in the year, it just might have one.

 

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Avanti Bill said:

The only thing that would make it rare is if it were a "full package" car, ordered with the "high performance" option with either a R1 or R2 engine.  This has neither and my advice is to run like the wind away from this project.  

Hold on a minute-I'm not sure that I agree. While rarity and condition are somewhat subjective, there is a conspicuous difference regarding each car and the audience to whom it appeals. Virtually all wagons, of the post-war era, were considered to be beasts of burden to be used up and quickly disposed of. For decades they were ignored by collectors, only to be discovered during the last twenty years. 

 

While some of us out west may become complacent, because some good examples have survived out here, I can attest to the dearth of rust free examples throughout the eastern two thirds of the country. This car a rust free, low mileage, top of the line Daytona that if it were east of the Continental Divide, would be in high demand. IMHO whomever buys this car will be happy with his choice. This is a car that is worth the gamble. I can envision a huge upside potential for this car-it would be fun to be able to do the discovery.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

To preserve the subject of this post here are the original details from the Facebook ad: 

 

1963 Studebaker lark wagonair Daytona
$2,500
Lewiston, CA
Driven 55,000 miles
Automatic transmission
Exterior color: White · Interior color: Black
Fuel type: Gasoline
Up for sale is a 1963 Studebaker Lark Wagonair. Daytona V-8 model. Extremely rare vehicle. With the sliding rear roof. Ready for restoration. Has the original 289 Studebaker V8. Will need a rebuild. Has a few dings and scratches but is a complete vehicle. With extra chrome. $2500 no trades. Located in Lewiston California. delivery available
 
May be an image of outdoors  May be an image of car and outdoors
 
May be an image of outdoors  May be an image of outdoors
 
May be an image of outdoors  May be an image of outdoors
 
No photo description available.
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Buffalowed Bill said:

Hold on a minute-I'm not sure that I agree. While rarity and condition are somewhat subjective, there is a conspicuous difference regarding each car and the audience to whom it appeals. Virtually all wagons, of the post-war era, were considered to be beasts of burden to be used up and quickly disposed of. For decades they were ignored by collectors, only to be discovered during the last twenty years. 

 

While some of us out west may become complacent, because some good examples have survived out here, I can attest to the dearth of rust free examples throughout the eastern two thirds of the country. This car a rust free, low mileage, top of the line Daytona that if it were east of the Continental Divide, would be in high demand. IMHO whomever buys this car will be happy with his choice. This is a car that is worth the gamble. I can envision a huge upside potential for this car-it would be fun to be able to do the discovery.

I love Station Wagons and I will agree this model is unique with the sliding roof, Studebakers were ahead of their time.  However you can probably buy the best one in the country for a whole lot less than the restoration of this car, probably half.  I think you have to be rational when you look at a project and unless the car has big sentimental value for some reason it is not worth the cost and time of a restoration.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I really like Studes, and came very close to owning one but couldn't get a title. This car, in decent shape, would be loads of fun. The talk of any car show, plenty of power, and handy. Just keep it out of the rain. But this car, as presented? If they gave you the car...you couldn't get it on the road and come out even on the deal. Great engines but expensive to rebuild. And that's just the start of what you'll have to throw money at.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I became the 3rd owner of a '66 Wagonaire in 2012 and loved driving it for many years. As long as the roof was locked, it did NOT leak. The fellow I bought it from had purchased it used in 1970, and he had hunted decades for spare roof seals in case they ever cracked or leaked. He never found any, and the only time he ever got a shower down the back of his neck was after he forgot to lock the roof and the first time he stopped during a rainstorm.... SPLOOSH! He got out and locked the roof - no more water! I drove it several times in Kansas downpours and never got a drop inside because I kept it locked when it was closed.

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 hours ago, Avanti Bill said:

I love Station Wagons and I will agree this model is unique with the sliding roof, Studebakers were ahead of their time.  However you can probably buy the best one in the country for a whole lot less than the restoration of this car, probably half.  I think you have to be rational when you look at a project and unless the car has big sentimental value for some reason it is not worth the cost and time of a restoration.  

I usually don't find myself on this side of a discussion. It boggles my mind when I see some of the junk that a some people undertake as a project. I generally take the stand that Larks are a dime a dozen so why not hold out for a better one. Well this is one of the better ones that I've been talking about. In my opinion this is worthy of salvation.

 

I think that we are just scratching the surface of the wagon craze. The only cap is going to be the limited supply. I think this car is at the tipping point. It's a matter of saving it now or condemning it to parts car status. 

 

The car is not going to be for everyone. In fact there are so few willing and able to do the work anymore, that I may be only speaking to a handful of people. I think someone is going to step up to the plate and buy this car, I hope that he is up to the challenge. I believe that this car could be a lot of fun for the right person. 

Edited by Buffalowed Bill (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...