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Here's my 1930 Chrysler Series 70 Roadster


mike3121
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I've owned it for about a year-and-a-half. I've had LED front-rear turn signals installed. New front brakes, GPS speedometer, a couple of gauges, and a whole new interior to include a rumble seat. Car needs right headlight low beam fixed, hand brake working, and above all steering looked at. It has the "death wobble." Maybe a steering stabilizer? Any ideas on that matter.

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9 minutes ago, mike3121 said:

I've owned it for about a year-and-a-half. I've had LED front-rear turn signals installed. New front brakes, GPS speedometer, a couple of gauges, and a whole new interior to include a rumble seat. Car needs right headlight low beam fixed, hand brake working, and above all steering looked at. It has the "death wobble." Maybe a steering stabilizer? Any ideas on that matter.

1930-chrysler-series-70-roadster-23.jpg

20211128_102923_resized.jpg

20211128_094637_resized_1.jpg

20220327_163146_resized.jpg

Take it to your local front end alignment place and have them check the caster angle on the front axle shims. My 1931 DB had two shims on each side and one on each side was broken. The alignment guy removed the broken items and voila! It worked. No more death rattle.

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, mike3121 said:

It has the "death wobble." Maybe a steering stabilizer? Any ideas on that matter.

Yes, the DW can be eliminated by finding the perfect Caster setting and also Toe-in setting.  Some cars need different caster settings, so it might take the repair shop extra time in experimenting and multiple road tests.  Lots of shops are $120 per hour on top of paying for the basic alignment price.  Yes it's a good idea to have a competent shop check all alignment specs like "toe out at turns" which is the way to check for bent steering arms. 

 

There are lots of nasty internet fights about adding a steering damper/stabilizer, but they certainly will stop DW as it prevents the chain reaction when one wheel hits a bump or pothole.  Dampers also prevent unnecessary shocking/damage to the steering components, and heavy duty ones can help a car with bias-ply tires to not wander quite as much when you hit those pavement seams when changing lanes.

 

The top manufacturers of aftermarket hot rod chassis' using solid front I-beam axles always install dampers on every chassis they build.

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