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clutch freeze


31 LaSalle
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Sticking clutch will come free easily if you slip a knife blade or putty knife between the clutch plate and flywheel or clutch plate and pressure plate. This can often be accomplished from under the car if there is an inspection plate or cover on the bottom of the bellhousing. This has to be done with the clutch pedal held down.

 

To prevent it happening again cut a stick or prop to go between the dashboard and clutch pedal to hold the clutch down while in storage. Back in the thirties this was recommended by many car makers including Rolls Royce.

 

Have also heard of squirting carbon tetrachloride or brake clean spray in there, have not tried this myself, the putty knife always does the job for me.

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Rusty is on the right track with his instructions above.  Particularly, the preventive measure of storing with clutch disengaged so the fiber friction disc material off the mating flywheel surface.  Rust is the culprit, the fiber material gets stuck to the flywheel.  I've had several Japanese compact tractors in the past that had a built in lever arrangement to store the tractor with the clutch disengaged.  Never had a clutch stick to the flywheel with those. 

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I had a 49 Chevy that the clutch would stick within 2 weeks time. I would prop the clutch down and use a spatula i bent to slip between the clutch and pressure plate. All I had to do was start the blade in between and I would hear a "ping" as the clutch freed up. Finally made a wood prop to keep the pedal down when parked for more than a few days. My Vette can sit for months and never have the clutch stick. Go figure...Bob

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After WW2 a lot of cars had stuck clutches from being laid up.

Rolls Royce told dealers to jack up the rear end of the car and put it on stands. You then removed the clutch inspection cover and sprayed the clutch liberally with acetone and left it for a short while, then started the car in gear and with the clutch pedal depressed, apply brake pressure and the clutch will brake free.

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1942 Hudson.  Regularly had a stuck clutch.

Turned out it was low on fluid . . . . . Refiled the housing and problems stopped.

A uniquely Hudson situation 😎

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I have not had a clutch stick to the flywheel. I did have one from long term storage that built up rust on the transmission clutch shaft spline and would not allow the clutch to "float" when disengaged. I had to snake a penetrating oil nozzle up to the shaft and work it quite a bit to free the center hub.

 

The car was a Metropolitan and I was lucky the guy they took it to before me didn't burn the clutch out pushing against a tree. And looking around underneath I was afraid the car might break in half if a pulled the crossmember to remove the transmission. Life is not always easy among the Met owners.

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