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1928 Chrysler convertible coupe series 72 - is the head/block red color correct?


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I have 1928 series 72  1928 chrysler convertible coupe information required 

was this a one year only build 

would it have the 3.6 L engine or the 4.1 L .

I have read somewhere that all 1928 convertibles were fitted with red head cylinder heads as standard is this correct

 

 

 

8rGtpOVW1TsdAaHfGm2tfI7ZZnvd2vkJovwanbH8.jpg

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Posted (edited)

I believe they all came with silver painted engine standard, there was an optional high compression head that was red.

 

"The Red Head Six-Cylinder Engine, 1928
The most notable engineering improvement in Chrysler’s 1928 models was the
Red-Head six-cylinder engine head. The innovation reduced the size of the combustion
chamber, resulting in higher compression ratios and increased power from the same
engine. Compression ratios rose from 4.7 to 1 on the original Chrysler Six to 6 to 1. For
the 1928 model year, Red-Head equipment was standard on all Chrysler Roadsters and
on all Imperial models and was available as an option on other models. Owners of six-
cylinder Chrysler cars manufactured after July 1926 could retrofit their engines as well. A
redesigned Red-Head engine for the Imperial 80 had 309.3 cid and developed 112 hp at
3300 rpm. In December 1927, Chrysler had more orders for the Imperial 80 than it could
fulfill."

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

Hi,

 According to the books I have, the series 72 can have 3 different cylinder heads. The standard ones were painted black , the silver dome and red head ones were an option and had the names in raised letters on the heads( see picture below), they were painted silver and red respectively.There is nothing in my books saying that all convertibles were fitted with red heads, but I stand to be corrected.

Whilst browsing the nett today I came across the following site with lots of pictures that will help you, especially as this cut away car is RHD. I found it interesting to see this RHD chassis from the factory has no heat control valve on the manifold. Check it out on https://collection.maas.museum/object/214116.

 BTW I sent you a private message, click on the letter icon at the top right of your screen

Viv

Ps the series 72 were all 4.1 litre motors

 

6054_6.jpg.c03d1040f22797084352540a910447f7.jpg

Edited by viv w
update (see edit history)
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Fantastic pictures of the RHD setup. I haven’t seen the factory ? air filter on a RHD before. No heat control on my 75 either. I have a silver dome head which as far a I know is original. (Shame that there are many usable parts on that chassis now cut in half 😁).

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Yeah the sectioned chassis is really interesting, it was donated to the museum back in 1929 so I guess there was no problems with sourcing parts back then. It certainly provides a great reference fo us who are restoring cars. The same museum has a sectioned Chrysler sedan body from 28 as well. 
Another thing I notice is the push pull cable mounted in the chassis cross member, my 72 has the same but I don’t know what it was for. Looking at the museum photos It maybe an exhaust cut out what’s everyone else think. 
I do plan on making contact with the museum and getting down there to have a look at some stage. 
now back to the heads I would think if nothing is written on them they are standard but I certainly could be wrong.

Ben

3C784702-BA99-41CF-B7D7-1383ED76AA67.jpeg

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I had always heard that model 72 roadsters were equipped with red head cylinder heads as standard equipment. Red heads were optional on other body styles. That seems counterintuitive to me. If any body style needed extra horsepower ,it would be the the heavier sedans. Maybe while ordering, the salesman would have cautioned to the sedan buyer, “optional, but necessary “. Zeke

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Posted (edited)

High compression makes more power but prone to spark knock under load. The light weight roadster would be much less likely to do so than a heavy sedan. I think they wanted to be sure sedan owners with high compression engines always bought high octane fuel so they made it optional.

I dare say most sedan buyers did not want the optional high compression head. They did not want to buy expensive premium fuel and were willing to accept slightly less power but smoother running .

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)
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I’m really not sure if all 72 roadsters were fitted with red heads as I have two 72 motors one out of a coupe and the other out of a roadster. Neither of these have red head or silver dome marked on them. The roadster one has a NH cast on to it the other only numbers. As I’m in Australia what was offered locally may have been different to USA. Here is a The coupe head.

1C19F765-5DDF-4201-AF2B-8DBFEB24F0DD.jpeg

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5 hours ago, leomara said:

My 1928 Chrysler engine head has 74895 -1  NH cast on it.  Still cannot find anyone to explain what it means or meant...........

hi leomara are you sure the 8 in your cast number is not a 3 

my cast number on my car is 74395- 1 NH  would love to know it meaning

Fh6i4Iy6mRlAKI9YTJyCQJhQqXj4xp7SN1Lk4J9v.jpg

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  • Peter Gariepy changed the title to 1928 Chrysler convertible coupe series 72 - is the head/block red color correct?
3 hours ago, viv w said:

74395 is listed in the parts book as a silver dome cylinder head. The 1 NH  probably stands for the foundry that cast it and the mold number. 

Thanks Viv that is some great info and clears up a couple of things for the rest of us. I kind of expected that my heads were the silver dome as they did not have red head on them. Thanks again Ben

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thanks viv w for the information on the cylinder heads 

I had thought mine was a red head 

on closer inspection of the cast number ( with my glasses on )

I had mistaken the 3 as an 8 

anyway silver dome it is 

another piece in the jigsaw of my cars Identity

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You can always paint it red then it is red and a head 🤣 sorry I couldn’t help myself. The other day I was nearly going to make a comment that NH might stand for Normal Head then I thought there is nothing normal about mine but now that I’m getting older I’m thinking Silver dome is much closer considering my hair is discolouring. Right that’s it I will stop now.

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hi vintageben 

I also thought NH could possibly mean normal head or even not high compression

as for painting it red the last owner of my car must have had a big tin of red paint

as he painted the whole engine and gearbox will have to paint it standard colour one day

 

but lots of work to do on the car before that

8rGtpOVW1TsdAaHfGm2tfI7ZZnvd2vkJovwanbH8.jpg

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