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Wood kits or patterns for a 1930 40 series Buick


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I don't have kits or patterns, do you have any of the old wood? In some cases the wood can be reproduced using the sheet metal as a pattern. It's not easy to do but if you have no choice.... One of my current projects is interior wood for a 39 Ford Sedan Delivery, these are pictures of some of the parts I've made for it, quite a few yet to go. I'm in South Alabama.

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Absolutely wonderful to see this excellent craftsmanship taking place. In the early 1970s a close friend who on occasion comments on the forums was a wood craftsman and recreated/replaced a good portion of the structural wood work in a Derham bodied victoria brougham I owned and was restoring. Main sills, entire cowl, door posts and then next was rear wheel arches on a 1941 Packard woody wagon I owned. It takes a lot of skill and patience plus the source for proper hardwood ( the lumber yard we used to buy this in was over an hour drive away over two bridges and has since ceased operation)

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4 hours ago, E-116-YH said:

Hello NewOldWood,

                                           That is very good work and I know since I used to do this sort of wood work as a full time job, I suppose I still could if I was crazy enough. Keep up the great work!

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That looks a lot like the 1929 Reo Flying Cloud Master semi sport coupe I had fifty years ago.

Only mine was never that far apart. I did minor mechanical work on mine. The body was decent, and the interior was actually still quite nice. It was a great driving automobile!

 

Beautiful woodwork by the way!

Edited by wayne sheldon
Additional thought. (see edit history)
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20 hours ago, NewOldWood said:

I don't have kits or patterns, do you have any of the old wood? In some cases the wood can be reproduced using the sheet metal as a pattern. It's not easy to do but if you have no choice.... One of my current projects is interior wood for a 39 Ford Sedan Delivery, these are pictures of some of the parts I've made for it, quite a few yet to go. I'm in South Alabama.

IMG_4496.JPG

IMG_4660.JPG

IMG_5084.JPG

IMG_5085.JPG

Curiosity, how are these cut? Over arm router with a template, shaper, cnc etc. ?

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6 minutes ago, TAKerry said:

Curiosity, how are these cut? Over arm router with a template, shaper, cnc etc. ?

Overarm routers are more for production flat work, and a CNC that would do this kind of work would be cost prohibitive in a number of ways. I always start with rough cut lumber, after it is milled to size either the table saw or band saw to remove most of the excess. After that as many of the shapes as I can are cut with routers using a variety of pattern bits and flat patterns. This is usually followed by at least a little hand work, hand planes, chisels etc... I have a duplicating machine for more complicated shapes although it wasn't used on any of these parts. It doesn't get used often, but when you need it nothing else will do. I have a shaper that gets used mainly for finger joints and a few other more common profiles that I have had custom cutters made for. And then there's...........sand paper..... My tool collection is much more antique than it is high tech.

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We have rewooded quite a few cars.  We did an L29 Cord some years back. 103 pieces of wood in the body not including doors or rumble lid.  We use our milling machine quite a bit to shape wood.  We also have a large duplicating router set up but as stated above we seldom use it.  Most important tool to have is patience,  lots and lots of patience.

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I have been making car wood for about 5-6 years now and I am more busy these days than ever. I recently purchased a 3’ throat, 221” long blade, 5 hp bandsaw, capable of cutting 2” ash at an average of 1” per 1-1 1/2 seconds and with a smoother, straighter cut than my Rockwell 14” saw that cuts 1” in about 35-40 in the same 2” ash. Because of a saw this size resaw capabilities, I am now able to take an 8” wide, 2” thick piece of ash and using the rip fence, cut a 1 1/8” plank out of it then feed it two or three times in the planer yielding a 1” plank. This saves a ton of time planing which is one of the most time consuming parts of wood body framing.

     I also purchased a Ritter 48” dual sided belt sander that allows me to have one table set on the biased at 90d and the other side table set ant any specific angle certain pieces might have. It also has an end table that rises to go from the 6” diameter drum roller to an upper 3” drum roller. Equipped with either a 40-60 grit belt this sander makes fast work of removing  the extra left from the marked line. Both pieces have speeded up my process close to tenfold. Once things like pillars are cut to their general shape, I prefer high HP trim routers for their small skirt size for putting in the recesses on the curved sections. I use the vertical mill almost exclusively for the mortises and tenons for the extreme accuracy in the joint work. There is always some hand chisel work and there’s definitely a lot of hand work but I find it all enjoyable.

     The majority of my work is on prewar GM cars and can range from a full body rewooding to having some remnants of a 33’ Olds roofs sent to me to duplicate, then returned by mail for a roof framing replacement.

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Thanks for the input. Interesting perspective. I am primarily a furniture maker and architectural millwork guy. We get into curves for doors and windows but mostly on a flat plane. I do not have an over arm and do most of the stuff with routers, patterns and hand work. One tool Im not sure if you guys use is a coarse flap wheel on an angle grinder. Dont laugh, its kinda like a belt sander/orbital sander on steroids. Its not for fine work, but can surely move a lot of wood in a hurry.

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On 5/10/2022 at 8:07 AM, TAKerry said:

Thanks for the input. Interesting perspective. I am primarily a furniture maker and architectural millwork guy. We get into curves for doors and windows but mostly on a flat plane. I do not have an over arm and do most of the stuff with routers, patterns and hand work. One tool Im not sure if you guys use is a coarse flap wheel on an angle grinder. Dont laugh, its kinda like a belt sander/orbital sander on steroids. Its not for fine work, but can surely move a lot of wood in a hurry.

If I want to dig a big hole and don't want to waste a lot of time I usually put this on the angle grinder. It's a high attention level tool but it will turn a board into wood chips in a big hurry! I used it to carve the concave face of these corner pieces. It is actually possible to be fairly precise with it if you're careful

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  • Peter Gariepy changed the title to Wood kits or patterns for a 1930 40 series Buick
12 hours ago, NewOldWood said:

If I want to dig a big hole and don't want to waste a lot of time I usually put this on the angle grinder. It's a high attention level tool but it will turn a board into wood chips in a big hurry! I used it to carve the concave face of these corner pieces. It is actually possible to be fairly precise with it if you're careful

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I do have one of those Beasts!  I used it once when shaping a windsor chair bottom. I have since found other methods I deemed safer, LOL.  

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