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1966 Chrysler Newport 43M original - $15,900 (Huntington Beach, CA) - Not Mine


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Not Mine.  Craigslist ad.

 

https://orangecounty.craigslist.org/cto/d/huntington-beach-1966-chrysler-newport/7478675241.html

 

1966 Chrysler Newport 43M original - $15,900 (Huntington Beach)

 

1966 Chrysler Newport

condition: excellent
cylinders: 8 cylinders
drive: rwd
fuel: gas
odometer: 42500
paint color: red
title status: clean
transmission: automatic
type: sedan

 

Beautiful classic with 42,500 original miles! This Chrysler Newport lived in a NJ garage most of its life. It was recently transported to California and is in remarkable condition for a 56-year old classic. The car looks impressive with original burgundy paint and long sleek lines accented with chrome in beautiful condition. The interior is also in impressive original condition with the entire dash and seats in excellent condition, in one of the most attractive color combinations that Chrysler offered in 1966. All dials and gauges are working properly, even the AM/FM radio is working. The interior still has the nostalgic aroma of 1966.

The Newport is equipped with a 383 cu V8 that starts and runs beautifully. The carburetor was professionally rebuilt and tuned in November, and only takes a half turn of the engine to start even when cold. On the road, the Newport is perfectly smooth, with the classic Chrysler suspension that floats in the clouds as you're driving. The Newport is also sporting brand new tires.

This car draws compliments wherever it turns. Your chance to own a beautiful classic with 42,500 original miles.

  • do NOT contact me with unsolicited services or offers

 

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Not Mine.  I have no personal interest in the sale of this 1966 Chrysler Newport.

 

If I was in the position to get another collector car this one would be at the top of my list.  I have always like the late 60s Chryslers and this one a great example.  

 

 

 

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My best friend in high school Father has one like this in Forrest Green. He bought it used about 1968.  I remember two 17 year olds driving  all over the place in it until Dad got tired if that and bought a 66 VW fastback for him and his brother to share. I remember it being a big comfy car.

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M is the Roman numeral for thousand and MM is meant to convey one thousand-thousand — or million.

K comes from the Greek word kilo which means a thousand.

While the fields of accounting, banking and finance have adopted the Roman tradition, other fields such as computer programming and the high-tech industry have adopted Greek-influenced abbreviations. 

SO now you know...

Seems like a very gentle 43,000 miles

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16 minutes ago, classiclines said:

M is the Roman numeral for thousand and MM is meant to convey one thousand-thousand — or million.

K comes from the Greek word kilo which means a thousand.

While the fields of accounting, banking and finance have adopted the Roman tradition, other fields such as computer programming and the high-tech industry have adopted Greek-influenced abbreviations. 

SO now you know...

Seems like a very gentle 43,000 miles

Yes, I am from an engineering background so k and 1000 are synonymous.  In my area of the world 43k miles would be typically used in the ad.  Roman numerals we’re most often found on movie credits for the date of the movie’s release in theaters.  I think that was done so that no one would realize they were watching an old movie when it was shown on late night TV😀.

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"M" was, for many, many years, the common identifier for "Thousands"-

Primarily since the 1960s, when computer lingo was starting to become more common, did "K" come into more common usage as a symbol for thousands, 

at least in my experience, serving to design Internal Systems Software at IBM Headquarters.

 

I still prefer K for Thousand and KK, or M for Million

 

So, maybe not incorrect at all?

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