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For Sale: 1926 Hudson Super Six 4dr Brougham - $17,000 - Nekoosa, WI - Not Mine


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For Sale: 1926 Hudson Super Six 4dr Brougham - $17,000 - Nekoosa, WI

1926 Hudson Brougham antique car - cars & trucks - by owner -... (craigslist.org)
Seller's Description:

This 1926 Hudson brougham has its original 288 cubic inch flathead six-cylinder motor and 3 speed manual transmission. The motor has six new valves, the seats were reground also. It has new wiring, turn signals, new $400 clutch, six new tires, tubes and flaps and the radiator has been professionally flushed. The original interior is very presentable. It starts and runs very nice. It gets lots of looks because you won't find another one around
Contact: (715) eight-eight-7-4-0-two-7
Copy and paste in your email: 4bb746ff208333c4afbab60300436da7@sale.craigslist.org


I have no personal interest or stake in the eventual sale of this 1926 Hudson Super Six 4dr Brougham.

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7 hours ago, Grimy said:

Why do people persist in painting *sedans* of this vintage RED?

I was thinking the same thing as I scrolled through the pictures.

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16 hours ago, Grimy said:

Why do people persist in painting *sedans* of this vintage RED?

Shouldn't that be "doing a lousy red paint job on sedans of this vintage?"  Notice how badly done it is on the door jams and on the hood/cowl area.  First thing the next owner has to do is sand off that offending red paint.

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Maroon in a conservative shade would have been fine.  Even a small amount of research would have shown that RED was reserved for sportier models, although some companies would have been willing to paint whatever color the customer desired--for a price.  1926 was just a couple of years away from "standard" colors for each body style and there were really no choices.

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2 hours ago, Grimy said:

...Even a small amount of research would have shown that RED was reserved for sportier models, although some companies would have been willing to paint whatever color the customer desired--for a price.

George, you may be right.  I'm not an expert on 1926

Hudsons, and likely none of us were around in the 1920's

to say definitively.  But here are a 1928 Cadillac sedan and

a 1928 LaSalle town car--not outlandish one-off creations

for some boisterous outlier, but actually shown in their literature:

 

 

1927 Cadillac--Bird of Paradise car.jpg

1927 LaSalle--Rose Coral car.jpg

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

George, you may be right.  I'm not an expert on 1926

Hudsons, and likely none of us were around in the 1920's

to say definitively.  But here are a 1928 Cadillac sedan and

a 1928 LaSalle town car--not outlandish one-off creations

for some boisterous outlier, but actually shown in their literature:

Hi John_S_in_Penna, some further info on that:  Circa 1927, 4-color printing for magazine adverts became suddenly and drastically cheaper as a result of technological improvements.  Auto manufacturers jumped on this, as witnessed by the series of Lincoln ads featuring brilliantly-colored exotic birds and brilliantly-colored cars.  About the same time, E.L. Cord saved Auburn by repainting left-over Auburns, especially sedans, in bright and contrasting colors.  There was a fellow about 25 years ago who showed a 1929 or 1930 short-wheelbase Packard phaeton painted in three shades of purple, along with a framed magazine ad (artist's conception) to "prove" his color choice was authentic.  Packard folks unanimously assured me that no such paint scheme would have been allowed to leave the factory. 🙂 Correct me if I'm wrong, but the colors depicted in brochures and magazine advertising were not necessarily available from the factory excepting special orders and custom coachbuilders, of course.

 

So in a few short years we went from standard-color-for-each body-style (early 1920s) to optional colors with the advent of Duco, to optional brilliant colors in the late 1920s.  I'm sure Walt G can further elucidate.  As the national mood darkened in the wake of the October 1929 crash, available colors generally became more somber.  Even later, the standard color for my long-owned 1934 Buick 56S of happy memory was Malolo Tan, but other colors were available as Special Orders--so said the brochure.

 

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So much of history is forgotten.  On other automotive

subjects, I've found facts in old publications that most

car experts today had no idea existed.

 

Such bright colors may well have been on special orders,

if the special-order process existed in some manner then--

but not 1-in-1000, but enough that contemporary accounts

of the time mention such brightly colored cars. 

 

Cadillac and LaSalle put together a lavish catalogue for

1928 on "Colors from Nature's Studio" in car design.  Would

they produce and distribute such literature nationwide

if they had no intention of following through?  Would

Packard illustrate that purple car--and a whole series of

bright cars--if everyone in the company objected as some

Packard fans say?

 

This is why history can be fun.

 

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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Right you are about history! And, if Cadillac and LaSalle had it, you know it filter down to "the lesser marques" quicker than a movie queen's hat style. 

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Marmon had its jewel colors launched  in 1927, quite unique variety of combinations based on precious or rare gems.

 

image.png.75b9329349669e08b55a96c495baa333.png
 

A good example of this Marmon painting approach can be seen in this other ad. I also believe Cadillac and Lincoln also offered a large variety of exotic color combinations.
 

image.jpeg.93162693f4e116fc892a44516c132dd5.jpeg

Edited by JRA (see edit history)
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