Jump to content

Make Sure Your Classic Car is Up to 2022 Crash Standards: Unique Messages Trying to sell my ‘82


MarkV
 Share

Recommended Posts

I’ve been trying to sell my 82 Imperial the last several weeks for $4750 I have about $7k into it the last couple of years and many videos and photos. But now I have received a Pro tip: When looking for a classic car make sure the head on collisions are up to 2022 standards! I swear selling this 82 Imperial certainly has its moments, You have to see it to believe it!

C6EB11AD-E5AD-4E08-8947-14EA01A11310.jpeg

33DCEF18-D483-484D-9868-C3410E0D81C7.jpeg

Edited by MarkV (see edit history)
  • Haha 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • MarkV changed the title to Make Sure Your Classic Car is Up to 2022 Crash Standards: Unique Messages Trying to sell my ‘82

Your Imperial has been saved from a horrible fate. People like that have no business owning or even aspiring to own an old car.

 

Don't get me started on the poseurs who think they must "upgrade/update" an old car to modern standards for it to be drivable and reliable. Those people shouldn't own old cars either. They do not "get" what owning, maintaining, and preserving an old car is about.

 

Can't stand poseurs or bs artists in any element but especially not in old car world. 

  • Like 7
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

When selling, car enthusiasts often want their cars

to find good, appreciative homes.  If this man is so

concerned about modern standards, it sounds as if

he wanted to drive it as his everyday car, not preserve it.

 

You'll find a good home for your Imperial.  You just

weeded out one of the not-so-good homes.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

32 minutes ago, 60FlatTop said:

There is only one response to that comment: "You typed that with one hand?"

 

Now I have The Rodeo Song stuck in my head for the rest of the night.

Great, now I have the Rodeo Song stuck in my head along with the image of 15 drunken Korean sailors singing it at the top of their lungs.

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A guy once drove 10 hours, with a trailer, to buy a 70's Dodge from me. No deal. As soon as he heard a 70's Chrysler starter he tucked his tail between his legs and ran. Not Dodge material!

 

I forget that some of the "regular" appearing men that walk amongst us are not really like us. I gave a guy a lift once in an old truck with only lap belts and I honestly think he was scared for his life.

  • Like 3
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A 1982 Imperial, electronic gremlins and all, is closer to a classic than a lot of the tripe I see polluting the roads while wearing antique/classic plates.

 

1982 Imperial: limited production halo car, high quality appointments (for its time anyway), distinctive styling, and advanced engineering (again for its time).

 

Yet I see similar vintage S10 pickups and other such assorted automotive dreck proudly wearing an antique plate while it hauls the owner's trash to the recycler.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So frustrating to deal with people who don't know much about old cars but don't care to learn and just go with their knee-jerk reactions. They somehow expect an old car to be just like a modern car except that it looks different.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

They somehow expect an old car to be just like a modern car except that it looks different.

So they put in a SBC,  disc brakes, 12V, power steering - and then marvel that it drives like a Frankenstein with 25 year old technology and half-assed engineering.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 minutes ago, bryankazmer said:

So they put in a SBC,  disc brakes, 12V, power steering - and then marvel that it drives like a Frankenstein with 25 year old technology and half-assed engineering.

I think you mean a Frankenstein's monster.

  • Thanks 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, oldcarfudd said:

I take my stuff to the recycler in a '14 T, or a '12 Buick, or (once in a very great while) a Stanley.  They all carry antique plates.  Isn't that part of the fun?

It is until non-old car people see you doing it and raise a stink to local LE and government. And since those organizations are very much like schools and military, instead of going after  individual offenders they'd rather send a message by punishing everyone.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Matt Harwood said:

So frustrating to deal with people who don't know much about old cars but don't care to learn and just go with their knee-jerk reactions. They somehow expect an old car to be just like a modern car except that it looks different.

Matt:

 

I give you great credit for having the patience to deal with these people.  It can't be easy...  After awhile, I would probably kick them out of the shop...

 

Paul

Edited by pfloro (see edit history)
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

20+ years ago, I got back into the hobby after a multi-decade layoff.  I bought a 1930 Model A deluxe roadster, a very presentable 20-footer and a good runner.  I gave lots of rides.

 

One weekend, the teenage girl across the street had her first Catholic communion, which I gather was a Very Big Event.  Many families with kids came for the festivities afterward.  I brought out the Ford, blew the a-hoo-ga horn and asked who wanted a ride.  I was, of course, swamped.  But one mother wouldn't let her kid ride because I had no seat belts.

 

There's no doubt that seat belts have saved countless thousands of lives over the last half century or so.  But come on, lady!  We're talking about a 1.3-mile loop of a private lake on private roads where kids happily play in the streets and the drivers notice and pay attention.  She must have thought that the ditches at the sides of the roads in 1930 overflowed with the rotting corpses of children hurled unbelted from speeding Model As.  Isn't it a miracle that some of us survived!

  • Like 2
  • Haha 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm more sympathetic to the potential buyer.  He probably didn't realize that old cars are much less safe than newer cars, and when he figured it out, he backed out.   In my experience, a lot of people don't realize this; when they see a big old car, they imagine it running over everything on the road from its sheer weight.  Of course, we realize that's not the case.  But what is obvious to us isn't obvious to a lot of people.  All part of the learning process. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, oldcarfudd said:

There's no doubt that seat belts have saved countless thousands of lives over the last half century or so.  But come on, lady!  We're talking about a 1.3-mile loop of a private lake on private roads where kids happily play in the streets and the drivers notice and pay attention.  She must have thought that the ditches at the sides of the roads in 1930 overflowed with the rotting corpses of children hurled unbelted from speeding Model As.  Isn't it a miracle that some of us survived!

It was an overreaction, I agree, although the automobile fatality rate per per person per mile in 1930 was about 35x higher than it is today.  That isn't nothing. 

 

Edited by 1935Packard (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Buyers make all sorts of lame excuses for backing out. It doesn't matter what they gave as the reason, it just means they changed their mind. They were daydreaming and tire-kicking, and then reality set in and they backed out. With either the real reason or a made-up one. Two minutes later, they'll discover another old car they like the looks of and go on to bother THAT seller. Some of them are complete idiots and truly don't have a clue. Some are just gathering information in their own annoying way and just might eventually pull the trigger some day. At least this one had the decency to reply and decline, some would waste your time and then just disappear. 

Edited by Big Beat (see edit history)
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, oldcarfudd said:

20+ years ago, I got back into the hobby after a multi-decade layoff.  I bought a 1930 Model A deluxe roadster, a very presentable 20-footer and a good runner.  I gave lots of rides.

 

One weekend, the teenage girl across the street had her first Catholic communion, which I gather was a Very Big Event.  Many families with kids came for the festivities afterward.  I brought out the Ford, blew the a-hoo-ga horn and asked who wanted a ride.  I was, of course, swamped.  But one mother wouldn't let her kid ride because I had no seat belts.

 

There's no doubt that seat belts have saved countless thousands of lives over the last half century or so.  But come on, lady!  We're talking about a 1.3-mile loop of a private lake on private roads where kids happily play in the streets and the drivers notice and pay attention.  She must have thought that the ditches at the sides of the roads in 1930 overflowed with the rotting corpses of children hurled unbelted from speeding Model As.  Isn't it a miracle that some of us survived!

Maybe she shouldn't have had kids, period!

 

Craig

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, oldcarfudd said:

20+ years ago, I got back into the hobby after a multi-decade layoff.  I bought a 1930 Model A deluxe roadster, a very presentable 20-footer and a good runner.  I gave lots of rides.

 

One weekend, the teenage girl across the street had her first Catholic communion, which I gather was a Very Big Event.  Many families with kids came for the festivities afterward.  I brought out the Ford, blew the a-hoo-ga horn and asked who wanted a ride.  I was, of course, swamped.  But one mother wouldn't let her kid ride because I had no seat belts.

 

There's no doubt that seat belts have saved countless thousands of lives over the last half century or so.  But come on, lady!  We're talking about a 1.3-mile loop of a private lake on private roads where kids happily play in the streets and the drivers notice and pay attention.  She must have thought that the ditches at the sides of the roads in 1930 overflowed with the rotting corpses of children hurled unbelted from speeding Model As.  Isn't it a miracle that some of us survived!

Going a step further. You get stopped and ticketed by a boy in a uniform.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Pfeil said:

Going a step further. You get stopped and ticketed by a boy in a uniform.

I already had that happen , although it did not result in a receiving a ticket.     In Canada, Daytime Running Lights are law on all cars produced since the 1990 model year.  While on my way home from a Studebaker meet in Bellingham, Washington, in my 1966 Studebaker, a young rookie RCMP officer pulls me over at a speed trap on the Trans-Canada near Golden, BC.  When I rolled to a stop, he said "I pulled you over because your daytime running lights aren't working, but now I see your car's too OLD!"   (I knew I wasn't speeding as I was stuck behind a semi-trailer who wasn't doing even close to the speed limit.)

 

Craig

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, 8E45E said:

"I pulled you over because your daytime running lights aren't working, but now I see your car's too OLD!"   (I knew I wasn't speeding as I was stuck behind a semi-trailer who wasn't doing even close to the speed limit.)

 

 

He probably wanted to look  at your 1966 Studebaker!

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, rocketraider said:

If you really wanted to stun the coplet, shoulda told him "this Studebaker was made in Canada!"

Or he should have just raised his shirt and said "these are my running lights" then winked at him kinda healthy like ;)

Probably would have created another discussion though... 

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...