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AJM
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My name is AJM from Denmark.

My car is a Cadillac Coupe Deville 1957.

I want to buy new tires for my car. The tires I have on now is Allstate sears 8.00 - 15 hwite walls.

I would like have the same on again, new ofcourse. Were can I buy them. I need 5 tires, one for the ekstra  in the trunkIMG_20211016_125605_2.jpg.571ac99151eb0e4e2878beed57595202.jpg

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Coker tire has just what you want, and only $284 each. I can only imagine the shipping. Maybe you should plan a trip to Hershey 2022, and shove them in your luggage going home.

 

Either way, your Allstate tires were most likely sold by Sears during the Eisenhower administration- so drive sparingly, and very slow, until you replace them. 

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Welcome to the forum, Mr. AJM!

 

Coker Tire, mentioned above, is a major source

of tires for antique cars.  Their website is:

https://www.coker.com/

 

Another source is Universal Vintage Tire in

Hershey, Pennsylvania.  They are actually owned by

Coker, but they operate somewhat independently:

https://www.universaltire.com/

 

I do not know about shipping to Europe, but these

companies could tell you.

 

By the way, I have a 1957 Cadillac myself.  It is a 

Fleetwood Sixty Special, in a rather unusual color

combination for a Fleetwood:

 

1957 Cadillac--mine at 2014 Latimore 1a.JPG

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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3 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

Welcome to the forum, Mr. AJM!

 

Coker Tire, mentioned above, is a major source

of tires for antique cars.  Their website is:

https://www.coker.com/

 

Another source is Universal Vintage Tire in

Hershey, Pennsylvania.  They are actually owned by

Coker, but they operate somewhat independently:

https://www.universaltire.com/

 

I do not know about shipping to Europe, but these

companies could tell you.

 

By the way, I have a 1957 Cadillac myself.  It is a 

Fleetwood Sixty Special, in a rather unusual color

combination for a Fleetwood:

 

1957 Cadillac--mine at 2014 Latimore 1a.JPG

Now that right there is one purty automobile..........Bob

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AJM, if you want to quote someone, go to that

person's comment and click on "Quote."  

That person's comments will appear in your response.

If the quote is too long, you can delete part of the 

quoted person's comments.

 

Then, continuing, just type whatever you want to say.

When you are finished, click on "Submit Reply."

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To 1912Staver.

In Denmark we have for example 175 70 15. The first number is the with of the tire. the next number is the hight of the tire. the last number is the with of the rim.

So what does 8.00 means?

I am pretty sure that the 15 is the with of the rim-

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7 minutes ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

AJM, if you want to quote someone, go to that

person's comment and click on "Quote."  

That person's comments will appear in your response.

If the quote is too long, you can delete part of the 

quoted person's comments.

 

Then, continuing, just type whatever you want to say.

When you are finished, click on "Submit Reply."

Thank you very much.

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4 hours ago, TexRiv_63 said:

Welcome from Texas, what a beautiful car!

Thank you very much, it only took me 37 years to afford it.

All of youre car´s must had cost a fortune 🙂

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On 3/24/2022 at 8:31 PM, 1912Staver said:

Nice Cadillac. I hope by " the same " you are meaning the same size and in a white wall. Sears Allstate has been out of business for some time now.

In Denmark we have for example 175 70 15. The first number is the with of the tire. the next number is the hight of the tire. the last number is the with of the rim.

So what does 8.00 means?

I am pretty sure that the 15 is the with of the rim-

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9 minutes ago, AJM said:

All of youre car´s must had cost a fortune 🙂

 

Thankfully, most American cars are quite affordable

in America!  It is definitely a middle-class hobby.

 

American cars in Europe may be more expensive--I don't know.

There is the cost to transport them;  and the supply is smaller.

 

When you see asking prices of American cars here,

remember that those are not the SELLING prices.  Many dealers

ask double what a car is worth, or perhaps "only" 50% more.

Some private parties overprice their cars too.

 

In reality, you can get a nice antique car here for $10,000 to

$20,000, and many car fans have more than one, or several.

 

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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15 minutes ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

The 800x15 tire designation is an older designation.

It is used today for tires for older cars, but not for new cars.

 

The number 15 refers to the diameter of the wheel in inches:

15 inches.  Maybe someone else can tell what the 800 means.

You´re right. It´s the diameter of the wheel in inches.

We also uses inches in Denmark 175 mm 70 mm 15 inches.

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41 minutes ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

Thankfully, most American cars are quite affordable

in America!  It is definitely a middle-class hobby.

 

American cars in Europe may be more expensive--I don't know.

There is the cost to transport them;  and the supply is smaller.

 

When you see asking prices of American cars here,

remember that those are not the SELLING prices.  Many dealers

ask double what a car is worth, or perhaps "only" 50% more.

Some private parties overprice their cars too.

 

In reality, you can get a nice antique car here for $10,000 to

$20,000, and many car fans have more than one, or several.

 

I pay´d what wouldt be like 50000 dollars for my car.

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37 minutes ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

The 800x15 tire designation is an older designation.

It is used today for tires for older cars, but not for new cars.

 

The number 15 refers to the diameter of the wheel in inches:

15 inches.  Maybe someone else can tell what the 800 means.

The 800 would be 8.00 inches the question is what the 8.00 inches is measuring. I believe it is the diagonal cross section of the tire since that is all that makes sense when I measure the 550x17 tires on my old car. I am guessing that most tires back then had a width to height ratio close to 1 to 1 so two numbers, as used nowadays, was not needed.

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18 minutes ago, ply33 said:

The 800 would be 8.00 inches the question is what the 8.00 inches is measuring. I believe it is the diagonal cross section of the tire since that is all that makes sense when I measure the 550x17 tires on my old car. I am guessing that most tires back then had a width to height ratio close to 1 to 1 so two numbers, as used nowadays, was not needed.

That makes sense.

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10 minutes ago, bryankazmer said:

I believe it was the tread width in inches, as now the first number is tread width but in mm

Okay. so that 8.00 inches is around 205 mm. that makes even more sense.

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800, sometimes written as 8.00 is the section width in inches (8 inches). The section width is the widest part of the tire, measured on whatever rim width the tire was designed on. Section height, measured from the bead seat to the tread, can be either 100%, 90%, or 82% (sometimes 80%) of section height, depending on when the size was introduced. The 82%(80%) sizes were introduced in 1965, and in most cases the section width number ends in a "5", so we can rule that out.

 

8.00 x 100% = 8.00   (8.00 x 2) + 15 = 31  

31 inch (787.4mm) tall tire with an 8 inch (203.2mm) section width

 

or

 

8.00 x 90% = 7.20   (7.20 x 2) + 15 = 29.4

29.4 inch (746.8mm) tall tire with an 8 inch (203.2mm) section width

 

I don't know which is right, I suspect 100%. It probably doesn't matter, because the tire manufacturers did not hold extremely close to the marked size in those days, and it is even worse in reproduction tires. I believe the large 15 inch sizes are some of the worst for size accuracy. The reproduction tire manufacturers publish actual measurements like modern manufacturers do, so it is possible to know what you are getting before you order it.

 

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)
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