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First Drive of my 1912 Flanders 20 Fore Door Runabout


cudaman
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A friend of mine came down on the first day of spring 2022 to help document the first drive of my 1912 Flanders 20 Runabout, see the attached video link.  All in all, it went pretty well.  I need to adjust the brakes and fix a couple of nuisance fuel drips.  Later that evening, we lit the kerosene and acetylene lamps.  One of the headlights wouldn't light, it turned out that the gas elbow at the bottom of the light was clogged, easy fix.  :)

 

 

 

 

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Regarding the headlights, I'm using the original E&J acetylene generator and lumps of calciaum carbide to make the acetylene for the headlights.  The top tank is filled with water and the mesh basket holds the carbide lumps.  When you open the valve, water drips from the top tank into the perforated brass cup in the middle of the mesh basket, wetting the carbide and generating acetylene gas.  The gas is then fed to the headlights via brass and red rubber tubing.  Once the gas is flowing, you open the headlight doors, blow inside to dissipate the accumulated gas, then light the burners with a match or other flame.  I use one of those long nose lighters to keep my hand at a safe distance.  :)

 

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Edited by cudaman (see edit history)
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23 minutes ago, MikeC5 said:

Where does one get carbide?

From Thomas "Carbide" Wilson of course - sorry I couldn't resist as he was a local boy who made those lights possible.  Kidding aside it is still available:

 

https://www.lehmans.com/product/five-2-lb-cans-of-calcium-carbide/

Edited by 3macboys (see edit history)
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  • 2 months later...

I have driven my Flanders a couple more times, less than five miles each time.  I relined the grease soaked brakes with new "green gripper" linings.  I also increased the water drip rate in my acetylene generator and removed the blockage that was keeping one headlight from lighting.

 

 

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Such a nice car! You have done a fine job of sorting it out and getting it ready to tour again. 

Many years ago, I knew a couple different people that owned and toured with Flanders automobiles. An elderly fellow of great energy, by the name of Jack Kopp, was a longtime member of the HCCA, and had quite a number of good cars over the years. Back in the 1950s and 1960s, he and his Flanders Twenty runabout were often seen on club tours and outings! In his later years, he had an early four cylinder Studebaker, and he often toured with a four cylinder Cole. The Flanders Twenty was still in his building, needing some minor "freshening". He often talked about it and remembered it fondly, saying he needed to take care of a few things so he could drive it some more.

About ten years ago, I got a bunch of early HCCA Gazettes, mostly from the 1950s. While thumbing through them, I found a few pictures of Jack and his Flanders on club tours. He was quite a character! It was like seeing an old friend again.

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  • 2 months later...

The heat wave finally broke (for now, at least), so my friend came over and we drove the Flanders again this morning.  For this test, I leaned the carburetor out some and slightly advanced the base timing, the car seemed to like the changes.  :)

 

 

 

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