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54 Lincoln Capri engine removal


B-ster

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Hello again. I'm in the process of taking the 317 from my
54 lincoln capri. Man are those heads heavy.
My first question is...
How many bolts hold the tranny to the engine? When the engine comes out, does the torque converter stay on the tranny or motor?
As a refresher, there are 68k miles on the engine, it was parked inside since 1965. The plugs were removed sometime since parked along with the carb, which is missing. It does turn, not stuck.
When I removed the carpet from the interior, there was a spot about the size of a football of surface rust, no holes. Just gonna wire wheel it with my drill. The frame and rockers, floor pans, fenders, trunk all rust free. Not a single sign of rust, no holes. All brightwork inside and out are present.
I know the steering and suspension will be redone but as long as there's no welding or body work to do, it will be easier.
Don't know what to do once the motor comes out, probably take the heads in for resurfacing and rebuild them. Doesn't seem to be too difficult a job. Now the block, that's another story. No idea what to do about that. Open to ideas.
Thanks for the help folks

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If you do not unbolt the torque converter from the flex plate it will come out with the engine.  If you do unbolt it from the flex plate it will stay with the transmission.  I would take the engine and transmission out as a unit if that was my car.

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Drain the transmission and torque converter before removing the engine/converter unit from the car otherwise there will be trans fluid all over your garage floor.  Torque converter should have two drain plugs in it 180 degrees apart.  Remove one and let it drain for a while.  It will likely be slow.  With luck the trans will have a drain plug as well.

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On 3/21/2022 at 8:17 PM, B-ster said:

Don't know what to do once the motor comes out, probably take the heads in for resurfacing and rebuild them.

Whoa!   FYI you are now entering a VERY DANGEROUS area!!!  

 

Your post implies that you are a novice (that's fine) BUT before you do anything to an old car you need to set your goals.

You are at the edge of a very deep rabbit hole and if you fall in you will find that it is bottomless. 

 

Questions:

1. Why did you feel a need to remove the engine? If it is a nice original car the engine could likely be started with only minor maintenance applied. 

2. How much do you expect to spend?  (rabbit hole) if you have the engine removed . . . "You might as well rebuild it" (right?) Figure many thousands of dollars to do so. (This is because what ever you think now, once it is apart - "It will need everything")

3. OK since you have the motor out are you going to do the transmission? (figure another $1000) 

4. What else do you plan to do to the the car???  NO Really this is the big question.

      Brakes? $400

      Suspension bushings $300

      Tires   $500-$800

      Radiator-cooling system $400-$700

      Fuel system (tank, carb, pump) $400-$500

This is to just make run. (estimates are based on you doing the simple R&R and a specialists doing the subassembiles 

 

Here is what typically happens: Novice gets a car. (nice decent car) assumes that it can be fixed up cheaply and begins to take it apart. Discovers that it takes A LOT OF MONEY to fix even the simple things.  Pushes it aside and loses interest. 

 

THE HARDEST THING TO SAY IN A CAR RESTORATION IS: "STOP! IT'S GOOD ENOUGH AS IT IS"

What are your plans and have you set a budget and a stopping point?

Edited by m-mman (see edit history)
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6 hours ago, B-ster said:

I think I will pull them both out together then separate them after. I have a manual but it doesn't have much info about the tranny at all. 

 

If your manual does not have much on the transmission, is it a FACTORY manual?  If not, a factory manual should be available on line/ ebay. 

 

A couple of thoughts on your position.  If the car/ engine only has about 68,000 miles and turns over, I would try to get it running.  First thing is to pull the oil pan and find out what is in the pan from sitting all those years.  Clean it out and put it back with a new gasket.  Fill up the engine with oil.  Also fresh coolant.

 

Next work with the fuel system.  Clean the tank, replace the filters, check the lines for crud/corrosion.  Check the fuel pump and see if it works.  It will probably need to be replaced because it is before alcohol was in the fuel and old rubber will go bad quickly with alcohol in the fuel.  That includes any rubber lines. The carb probably needs to be redone.

 

As for the engine, a conservative price to "redo" the engine is $1,000/cylinder and could easily be closer to $1,500/cylinder.  That is for the machine shop work.   Plan on the higher number and be surprised if it is less.  That is just the going rate +-.   Since you say it turns over, I would try to get it running first!!

 

M-MMAN is correct in his numbers.  I would typically say that the final cost to do anything on a car is at least two to 10 times more than your initial estimate.   A good guess from my experience would be to take your guess and multiply by 5 to what it would eventually cost you.  Be happy and surprised if it is less.

 

As for M-MAN saying,  "Here is what typically happens: Novice gets a car. (nice decent car) assumes that it can be fixed up cheaply and begins to take it apart. Discovers that it takes A LOT OF MONEY to fix even the simple things.  Pushes it aside and loses interest."

 

He is correct.  I have bought a couple of the preverbal "basket cases" for a lot less than they would be "worth" if they were together.  Many of those vehicles just get parted out.  I personally parted out a vehicle because I could buy a running driving car for less than the cost of an interior. A lot more money to reassemble that they are worth assembled.

 

Get it running and enjoy it as it is. Learn about your car.  Have fun.

 

Just my humble opinion.

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)
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Ok, understood. 

First off, there is no carb and before I spend $700 on a carb, I want to see what the condition of the upper and lower heads are, and see if a rebuild or new motor is best. The spark plugs were removed sometime between 1965 and 2022 so I felt there was a good chance moisture or pack rats got in to get the cylinders compromised. 

After I opened the heads I found the heads were really gunky, looks like thick black grease all over everything. I got one head off and there was a little rust in one cylinder and a little debris in another. Looks like a lot of carbon buildup on the top of some of the pistons. I know there's not a lot of miles on her but it is quite grungy in there. 

My wife wanted me to build her a nice mid 50s car and wants it done in 5 years. We expect to invest around 50k. I was planning on doing as much of the work on it as I can, tearing down the engine and rebuilding it myself. If a shop is required, it'll be utilized. 

True, I am a novice but am retired and need a hobby. I realize it'll be costly, especially being a Lincoln with factory air, but am anxious to dive in and learn. So far every nut, bolt and screw has come off without cutting or heating, so that's a positive for me. Entire body part and floor is solid and straight, so it's mainly going to be mechanical, interior and paint. 

I appreciate your advise and warnings but I feel I have the right attitude and expectations 

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May I jump in here?  

  Larry and m are right on, in my opinion.  Probably some of what you are talking about rebuilding may not need doing.  My 1950 Buick had 95,000 miles showing. The suspension/steering did not need replacing.  I did the engine which probably did not need doing.  Go slow.  ENJOY!

 

  Where are you located?

 

  Ben

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18 hours ago, B-ster said:

I think I will pull them both out together then seperate them after. I have a manual but it doesn't have much info about the tranny at all. 

In the fifties and sixties "Motor's Auto Repair Manual" covered automatic transmissions very well, and engines too. You could dismantle and rebuild them by their photo's and text. I would suggest you pick one up from 1954, 55, 56, or 57 that would cover your 1954 year. I'm sure you could find one on eBay. These books also give a lot of information and techniques that you won't find in the "factory service manuals" that were printed for professional mechanics. If your new to the auto repair, refurbish or restoration fun and games, you need all the reading material you can get. Don't get me wrong though, the factory service manual is a very important tool, but not the only one you need. Good luck 

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22 hours ago, B-ster said:

I have a manual but it doesn't have much info about the tranny at all. 

FYI in the early 1950s FoMoCo commonly published a separate book that covered the automatic transmission.  

Likely you already discovered that your 1954 Lincoln uses a General Motors built (4 speed) Hydra-Matic transmission. The Ford Built (3 speed) automatic started use in Lincoln  in 1955. 

 

You can never have too many factory manuals and as mentioned the Motors manuals. To understand them better it helps to know who they were written for. 

The factory manuals were aimed at dealership mechanics, journeyman level, who were assumed to already have an understanding about basic mechanics. So sometimes information about something "as simple as removing an engine" might not be covered extensively. (but sometimes it is!) 

The Motors manuals were written for home mechanics but one volume covers ALL makes and models so sometimes it becomes too general. 

 

The procedure for old car repair is: Look at what you have, read all available period information, maybe remove a few things to understand the situation better, ask questions of people who have gone before, (this board) do the work, and repeat.  And have fun. 

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17 hours ago, B-ster said:

After I opened the heads I found the heads were really gunky, looks like thick black grease all over everything. I got one head off and there was a little rust in one cylinder and a little debris in another. Looks like a lot of carbon buildup on the top of some of the pistons. I know there's not a lot of miles on her but it is quite grungy in there. 

BTW - welcome to the car hobby.

Now that we have a better understanding  of where you are coming from and what you want your car to become, it helps us help you. 

 

Your description above sums up the reason for having a plan (goals?) for your project.  OK, you got the heads off, they are gunky, I bet there is a ridge in the cylinders BUT is it wear? or just carbon? What are you going to do next? 

 

1. Financially challenged people might disassemble the engine, figure out the minimum that it needs, reuse the maximum number of parts possible and reassemble it and hope for the best while enjoying the experience. 

 

2. You indicated that you have the resources for this project. AND you want a car that you and your wife can enjoy RELIABLY.  Sounds like you can stop LOOKING at the engine and just go ahead with a full rebuild. Jump right in and begin making it new again.  

You said you have a 5 year timeline. . . very realistic. Your Lincoln engine was used from 1952 to 1957.. But during that time it changed sizes so not all parts fit across the board. Parts are available, but it is not a Chevrolet motor.

What this all add up to is 6 months to a year of; machine shop, parts search and reassembly is realistic. 

 

You said "First off, there is no carb and before I spend $700 on a carb. . . "

 

If your plan is to restore the car . . . .then go ahead start on the engine and begin searching for a carb. You have 6-12 months of engine repair time to find one. Carburetor cores (that you can rebuild or have rebuilt) should cost much less than $700.  I know that there are many carburetors sitting in garages of people who have worked on Lincolns that you can likely get very cheap. But, finding these people? That's why you join clubs and begin networking. 

 

Some of this (reassembly?) you might want to do yourself but always think about what else you can do while you are waiting for the engine to be finished.

Send the transmission in for an overhaul?

Rebuild the brake system?

Sort out the fuel tank and fuel system?

Begin finding, buying overhauling all the underhood accessories; fuel pump, water pump, generator, starter, etc. (so that they will be ready when the engine is done)

Cleaning and detailing the under hood?

 

But DO NOT GET AHEAD OF YOURSELF!.  

You are starting on the mechanicals (excellent) but during this time, do not take apart the body or interior!  

A hazard of car work is losing parts and forgetting how things go back together. (It happens to all of us) 

 

Set a goal. Maybe, having it operational(?) THEN begin removing the trim for paint, or the interior to clean and repair the power windows and seats only after it is back running. 

 

Retirement project? GREAT!

Learn something new? wonderful?

Want to actually get it done? (and within 5 years?)  

Pace yourself, dont begin tackling new tasks before you finish the first.

AND try to do something every day. Projects get stalled when people say; "I only want to do car work when I can put in a full day" I have discovered that my projects move faster when I go to the garage and do just ONE thing. Sometimes I work for just an hour, or even a few minutes, but it keeps the project moving. 

 

It sounds like you are very realistic about what you want to accomplish and hope to see you at a meet someday. 

Edited by m-mman (see edit history)
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Fyi, I'm in southern Arizona, Sierra Vista. The car was stored in Tucson for the 57 year siesta. I did disassemble the interior first thing cuz there was a ton of mouse activity in there and it was just plain old nasty. Seats were almost completely gone, carpet covered with crap. Plus I wanted to see what was hiding beneath the carpet, rust-wise, which luckily,was none.

I am also hoping to change the front brakes to disc and power brake master cylinder to a two line system. I was just thinking that the rubber in the steering and suspension has been in this dry climate it's whole life, that they would be needing to be charged out. Haven't really looked at them yet.

We want to change the color of the car from the green to a yellow with dark green roof, so that's another reason I'm pulling the motor out. 

Been taking a lot of pics while disassembling everything for reference to put it back together.

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35 minutes ago, B-ster said:

I am also hoping to change the front brakes to disc and power brake master cylinder to a two line system.

Beware: Another slippery slope. Should you leave things stock? or try to "Improve" them?

FYI - The AACA promotes stock, correct restorations, so that is the feedback that you will generally get here. 

The problem (for a novice) is once you begin changing things then the job becomes WAYYYYyyyyyy more complex. 

The factory engineered it. The factory did it so that it all works together. Once you begin changing one thing then you need to change others. Once you beging changing things then none of the original manuals apply any longer.  

 

Sadly not all the "upgrade" kits (disc brakes?) fit or work as well as advertised. Poor instructions or poor application to something like a 54 Lincoln is common.  

Call to tech support:  "I dont understand why you are having trouble putting our parts on your Lincoln. They fit real well on every Chevrolet out there"

 

The factory drums work just fine. The ONLY advantage to discs is that they dissipate heat better and have less fade in hard braking situations. Do you plan a lot of hard braking in your Lincoln?  (repeat panic stops? Holding back a trailer going down hill?) 

 

There is a discussion on this board about re-engineering the pedal linkage to achieve the correct pedal travel on a car where the owner was changing the booster/master cylinder. One change leads to another, and another. . . . 

 

You haven't yet mentioned changing from 6 to 12 volt. Another slippery slope. Not a simple swap it changes EVERYTHING; bulbs, charging system, gauges, radio, power window and seat motors. And your car has cloth wiring. you will need to think about harnesses. . . . Back to how much time and money do you want to invest?  

 

35 minutes ago, B-ster said:

I was just thinking that the rubber in the steering and suspension has been in this dry climate it's whole life, that they would be needing to be charged out.

Guaranteed! Absolutely you need new front end bushings. I dont even have to look. The only question is where in the process of the project will you perform that task?

 

Again this is an example of forming a plan. You are thinking about changing to discs and dual master cylinder, but are wondering about new bushings.  

Of course you are going to install all new wear parts long before you consider any "upgrades". 

 

Dont let the TV shows fool you. Typically those people have the tools and experience to make it look easy.

Again this is your first project, you have lot to learn.

Fixing a car is difficult enough just keeping it as it was engineered. Suggestion: dont make it more difficult by trying to re-engineer it. 

Edited by m-mman (see edit history)
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18 hours ago, B-ster said:

First off, there is no carb and before I spend $700 on a carb, I want to see what the condition of the upper and lower heads are,

 

True, I am a novice but am retired and need a hobby. I realize it'll be costly, especially being a Lincoln with factory air, but am anxious to dive in and learn. So far every nut, bolt and screw has come off without cutting or heating, so that's a positive for me. Entire body part and floor is solid and straight, so it's mainly going to be mechanical, interior and paint. 

I appreciate your advise and warnings but I feel I have the right attitude and expectations 

 

I will enlarge on a couple of comments including not getting ahead of your self.  Get the car running and start taking a nibble at a time to improve it.  Driving it and fixing it at the same time will add pleasure to your old car experience.

 

It is great advice to not try to "IMPROVE" the car.  The cars worked fine when new and repaired to manufacturers specifications.  They are a pleasure to drive and we all recommend that you enjoy the car as built. 

 

If you start changing stuff to improve it you will end up with a frankencar.  Unless you meticulously document EVERY NOT OIRIGINAL PART that you put on the car, you will not be able to remember what the part came off that you changed.  Further, what is the next owner going to know after you pass on the car to the next person.  Easier to look in the standard Ford parts book to get the correct part.

 

As for taking it apart, below are some pictures of what I started with about three years ago and what it was last fall.  I have added more parts to the red chassis since then.  I just have not taken another picture lately.

 

This is another over ambitious previous owner announced that "I am going to restore my car".  I bought all of the pieces as shown on the shelves and more.  The last picture shows my progress about last fall.  I hope to have the chassis running this summer.  I am getting close.  I still have some parts out at a foundry being copied from a friends car.  I have also taken parts from this car to be used as patterns for others cars.   

 

In order to get there, I have some of the greatest friends with similar car along with a VERY  TALENTED MACHINIST FRIEND.   Without him this project would be exponently more difficult.  I have had to have many small parts made, or I did the machining myself.  It seems that everything that you do is divisible by $1,000.00. 

 

My experience..    Also, where do you live?

 

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Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)
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As stated above I live in southern Arizona. I took some pictures of the innerds of the engine to prove my point that just trying to start it would have been a mistake without seeing the inside. As you can see it has rust in the water jackets( I believe that's what the water flows thru). One of the jackets is almost completely blocked on the head gasket. Rust and debris in the cylinder wouldn't have been very helpful being scraped around in there. I can only imagine what's in the oil pan. 

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1 hour ago, B-ster said:

just trying to start it would have been a mistake

  You made a very good call.

On ‎3‎/‎21‎/‎2022 at 11:17 PM, B-ster said:

Now the block, that's another story. No idea what to do about that. Open to ideas.

looking at the one cylinder bore (the one with the rust); it sure looks like there is a huge wear ridge at the top.  That engine definitely needs a rebore and oversize pistons, and a complete rebuild. If that is deep wear and not mostly carbon above it, that motor may have a lot more miles than the speedometer shows.  Back then, car dealers made lots of profit by turning back the miles on a clean trade-in's.  Last time I saw that stuff happen in person was at a new-car dealer in the mid 70s.

 

One of the well known older guys on the first years of the Great American Race ran a late model used car lot his whole life.  He had the highest prices in town, and his cars were always the lowest miles.   When I was a teen in the late 60s, DMV shut him down for 2 weeks and gave him a big fine for "clocking cars".  That did not stop him though. LOL

 

I also see heavy wear from rocker arm tip on valve stem.  That could be from higher miles than showing, but that family of Fomoco engines were notorious for poor oil flow to the rockers as they aged.  Sludge does not really prove it had super high miles as the old oils always made a mess like that.

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I am thinking that it must have been a pretty hard 60,000 miles.

The lubes back then were not what is available today.

I would guess that this engine was run with non detergent oil, hence all that sludge.

The ring ridge that F&J refers to in fact does suggest more than a 60K engine.

No big deal but you would be wise to do a full rebuild while its apart.

You are now at the "while its apart" phase.

Cool car, we all want to see it up and driving someday.

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Agree with the above, but when you put the engine together, be sure that the head gasket is oriented correctly.  Some head gaskets will go on, but will block some of the passages. 

 

I would take the engine and parts to the local engine machine shop and have them put all of the parts into the tank.  Everything should come out clean.  Just be sure to check any passages that might have a pipe plug on either the front or rear of the block.

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your Transmission is a GM built Dual Range Hydra-Matic four speed transmission, 1954 was the last year that Lincoln used the Hydra-Matic, to correct the other replies here, 1) the engine's flywheel is not a flex plate, it is a flywheel and cover or lid for the torus bowl, 2) there is no torque converter, it is a fluid coupling that has a torus bowl, a cover (flywheel), two torus halves, one is the driving half - it's splined to the torus bowl and turns with the torus bowl and flywheel, the other half of the torus is the driven half, it's splined to the input shaft, there are 30 bolts that fasten the flywheel to the torus bowl, these have to be removed along with the bell housing bolts before you can separate the Hydra-Matic from the Lincoln V8 engine. 

Charles L. Coker

1953 & 1954 Pontiac

Technical Advisor

 POCI

 

Edited by pontiac1953 (see edit history)
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On 3/22/2022 at 3:01 PM, dictator27 said:

Drain the transmission and torque converter before removing the engine/converter unit from the car otherwise there will be trans fluid all over your garage floor.  Torque converter should have two drain plugs in it 180 degrees apart.  Remove one and let it drain for a while.  It will likely be slow.  With luck the trans will have a drain plug as well.

there is no torque converter, the torus bowl of the fluid coupling has one drain bolt.

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Charles,

Depending on this car's build date it may not have a Hydra-Matic due to the Plant Fire that destroyed the GM Hydramatic on August 12, 1953. Based on the disruption in availability Ford had to switch to a Borg-Warner strengthened Merc-o-matic transmissions due to the disruption in availability.

Lew Bachman

1957 Thunderbird

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15 hours ago, 1957Birdman said:

Charles,

Depending on this car's build date it may not have a Hydra-Matic due to the Plant Fire that destroyed the GM Hydramatic on August 12, 1953. Based on the disruption in availability Ford had to switch to a Borg-Warner strengthened Merc-o-matic transmissions due to the disruption in availability.

Lew Bachman

1957 Thunderbird

the august 1953 Hydra-Matic plant fire, stopped the supplies of transmissions for 90 days, by then the new plant location was up and running, what you're talking about, would have affected late 1953 Lincoln production, not the 1954 Lincoln production. 

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  • 2 years later...
On 3/22/2022 at 5:26 PM, m-mman said:

Whoa!   FYI you are now entering a VERY DANGEROUS area!!!  

 

Your post implies that you are a novice (that's fine) BUT before you do anything to an old car you need to set your goals.

You are at the edge of a very deep rabbit hole and if you fall in you will find that it is bottomless. 

 

Questions:

1. Why did you feel a need to remove the engine? If it is a nice original car the engine could likely be started with only minor maintenance applied. 

2. How much do you expect to spend?  (rabbit hole) if you have the engine removed . . . "You might as well rebuild it" (right?) Figure many thousands of dollars to do so. (This is because what ever you think now, once it is apart - "It will need everything")

3. OK since you have the motor out are you going to do the transmission? (figure another $1000) 

4. What else do you plan to do to the the car???  NO Really this is the big question.

      Brakes? $400

      Suspension bushings $300

      Tires   $500-$800

      Radiator-cooling system $400-$700

      Fuel system (tank, carb, pump) $400-$500

This is to just make run. (estimates are based on you doing the simple R&R and a specialists doing the subassembiles 

 

Here is what typically happens: Novice gets a car. (nice decent car) assumes that it can be fixed up cheaply and begins to take it apart. Discovers that it takes A LOT OF MONEY to fix even the simple things.  Pushes it aside and loses interest. 

 

THE HARDEST THING TO SAY IN A CAR RESTORATION IS: "STOP! IT'S GOOD ENOUGH AS IT IS"

What are your plans and have you set a budget and a stopping point?

Hey 👋  I just got me a 54 Lincoln  capri,  it is my first classic car... it was running when i got it, put it on my driveway to change oil and it wont start,  had the generator and starter refurbished,  also got a new distributor and solenoid and it is not working,  very low crank, any ideas on what I should do next? Also is that car is negative ground but I've seen other cars that are positive ground, 

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Probably the number 1 reasons for slow crank after a bad battery is crummy/bad battery cables.  If the cables are original, replace them, and if a 6 volt system DO NOT go to the local parts store and get new cables there.   Those cables are for 12 volt cars.  You will need to get the cables made up from welding cable.  Go to a welding store and have them made up to match length and size and crimp the ends for you.  Then solder the ends to be sure you have excellent electrical connection. Soldering will correct a lot of long term and short term problems with electrical integrity.   You will probably need something like 4-00 cable.  Good luck. 

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4 hours ago, JM Narvaez said:

Hey 👋  I just got me a 54 Lincoln  capri,  it is my first classic car...

Welcome to the car hobby!

First off I will say it before you or anyone else suggests changing your car from 6 volt to 12 volts.
 DONT DO IT!!  


Fixing and restoring an electrical system takes time and effort. Changing the operating voltage involves reengineering everything. It doesn’t make things easier it makes them harder. Harder to find parts and much harder to diagnose and repair the many problems that are guaranteed to come up.  
 

Now, on to your situation. You used the words “It won’t start”. This description is almost worthless in trying to assist you from a distance.  We are happy to help but please, when you ask for help tell us all you can!

 

What condition is your car in?  Was it a good running restored car that the previous owner drove regularly?  Was it a barn find that a hack got running but performed few actual repairs?  Is it somewhere in the middle?

BTW we love to see pictures of cars.  
 

The suggestion about making sure that you have VERY THICK  battery cables is excellent and quite possibly your problem. 6 volt systems like big thick meaty wires. 

 

I have to say that Alarms are going off in my head when you said that you had some parts refurbished and that you purchased other parts. 

Have these been installed?

 

Were they installed properly? (The comment about not knowing the correct ground is concerning)

 

What other testing was done? Batteries go bad and people seem to want to blame other parts without testing the battery. 


You stated that your car wouldn’t start (I am going to assume you mean not CRANKING instead of not firing) Then you said that you bought a “distributor” …… why??? 

The distributor has nothing to do with cranking it works the spark plugs. Changing a distributor is deceptively easy BUT doing so affects the engine timing and if you don’t understand how to do this properly, your car will never run again.  
Please tell us more!  


We love to fix cars and help people, but please always give us all the details AND tell us about what automotive skills and experience you have.  
Again welcome aboard 

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On 6/8/2024 at 12:29 PM, m-mman said:

Welcome to the car hobby!

First off I will say it before you or anyone else suggests changing your car from 6 volt to 12 volts.
 DONT DO IT!!  


Fixing and restoring an electrical system takes time and effort. Changing the operating voltage involves reengineering everything. It doesn’t make things easier it makes them harder. Harder to find parts and much harder to diagnose and repair the many problems that are guaranteed to come up.  
 

Now, on to your situation. You used the words “It won’t start”. This description is almost worthless in trying to assist you from a distance.  We are happy to help but please, when you ask for help tell us all you can!

 

What condition is your car in?  Was it a good running restored car that the previous owner drove regularly?  Was it a barn find that a hack got running but performed few actual repairs?  Is it somewhere in the middle?

BTW we love to see pictures of cars.  
 

The suggestion about making sure that you have VERY THICK  battery cables is excellent and quite possibly your problem. 6 volt systems like big thick meaty wires. 

 

I have to say that Alarms are going off in my head when you said that you had some parts refurbished and that you purchased other parts. 

Have these been installed?

 

Were they installed properly? (The comment about not knowing the correct ground is concerning)

 

What other testing was done? Batteries go bad and people seem to want to blame other parts without testing the battery. 


You stated that your car wouldn’t start (I am going to assume you mean not CRANKING instead of not firing) Then you said that you bought a “distributor” …… why??? 

The distributor has nothing to do with cranking it works the spark plugs. Changing a distributor is deceptively easy BUT doing so affects the engine timing and if you don’t understand how to do this properly, your car will never run again.  
Please tell us more!  


We love to fix cars and help people, but please always give us all the details AND tell us about what automotive skills and experience you have.  
Again welcome aboard 

Hey 👋  ,thank you so much for the welcoming and for responding,  the car is supposed to be a barn find, it was running ok when I first got it, the ground was negative... suddenly it didn't want to turn on,  very often had to recharge the battery, then we got nothing,  found out thats there's spark from coil to didtribuitor,but nothing from there to spark plugs.. that's why I've decide to make a replacement,

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Pictures! Excellent.   Some thoughts:

You should probably start a new topic about YOUR car instead of adding to the 2 year old one.  
 

Do you have a factory shop manual? 
If not, GET ONE.  Buy an original paper copy from eBay.  Scans and CDs are ok, but the pictures are always dark and clouds the details.  
You can likely find one for less than $50.  They have all the details you need to do repairs.  
 

1954 Lincolns are Positive ground. They were built that way and they need to be repaired that way.  
Collector cars are 30, 50, 80 or more years old.  During that time there is no end to the changes and modifications that people might have made. Rarely are the changes a benefit or “upgrade”.  In most cases the changes were done out of ignorance OR to try to fix a problem that the owner didn’t understand.  
Example: take a positive ground car, install the battery (backwards) with the ground as negative and it won’t charge.  Perhaps they got it to charge by polarizing it backwards, but that causes problems in the many other electrical components.  
 

Ahhhhh, yes….. Lincoln and their underfloor battery….. 😔

Lincoln didn’t put the battery under the hood until 1958!

 

Why we like pictures: Your cables are too small.  Yup, 6 volt cars like (demand?) BIG, thick cables.  Size 00 maybe even bigger.  The small (12 volt) auto parts store cables will not carry enough current (amps) they get hot and crank slowly. Sound familiar?

Welding cable is good, but those small cables need to go. 
 

Spark from coil but not at the plugs? BUT it was running fine before? 
Perhaps there is a problem inside the distributor, but I am wondering how you are checking for power at the plugs?

 

And tell us a little about your automotive experience so we can know how basic or complex to frame our answers.  

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