Jump to content

Current wheel Cylinder sleeving price


Flivverking
 Share

Recommended Posts

Here is the bill for sleeving 5(one extra ,duh! )Lockheed wheel cylinders for a 1927 Chrysler model G70. 

$519.82.

"Brake and Equipment Warehouse",are so much more on top of there game coompared to another company from New York ,who's work did not prove to be any good on many levels. We were disgusted to the point where we ended up scrounging another set of  cylinders to have sleeved and abandoned the ones "the New York company" worked on ,leaving them on the car and brakes intact and not working till we were ready to hit them(the brakes) again.

 

I sent the 5 replacement cylinders in Sat. March 5th 2020.

The morning of Thursday March 10th,I get the call from (B&E W) they are done!

I pay for them and they are delivered Tues.March 15th! 

  They were wrapped and packed  like antique china plates would be shipped with all new clean materials.

 

  Notice the invoice shows the work as "step bore" only because the cylinders require a center bore grove or space for an internal piston stop attachment,so it's a double sleeve affair to leave the space.

 

They supplied ,at my request, the seal cups and boots.I sent in one piston to help match up the boots.

 

The sleeves are stainless steel ,the cylinders are a painted dull metal gray,probably something like the Eastwood brake paint.

 

I delt with easy going Justin,phone counter man,and Brad from the brake / machine shop..Pleasent, to the point ,no nonsense gents.

 

I'll be slow getting back to ripping into these brakes again ,cleaing up the old mess residue,some ,repainting and fussing with dopy crush washers!

 

We never have troubles with mechanical brakes 😜

 

 

 

0315221703a.jpg

0316221352.jpg

0316221359.jpg

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That total is a little eye watering but you have to pay a pretty penny for good work these days.

And thank you for the comparison with Apple's work.

That little tidbit is bound to help someone in the future.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Right in my back yard, Brake and Equipment Warehouse, I have been recommending them for years.  I use them for brake lining, always excellent work.  I have found the prices reasonable, I had a master cylinder done a couple years ago it was under $100.  I can't buy Graham master cylinders any more, so the price seemed more than fair.

 

https://brakeandequipment.com/

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 minutes ago, JFranklin said:

They probably have a fixture to mimic the backing plate mounting surface.

True, but you have the bore clean surfaces, press in the new sleeves and finish machine it. Does it sit in the setup through all those steps or in and out recentered or what? Looks like it was worth the price paid by the OP. Bob 

Edited by 1937hd45 (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

As far as machining goes, Either in a Lathe or Mill, either is acceptable as long as the job is done right. Yes. The challenge is holding it. In a Mill, a fixture would be the way to go and a tapered center for alignment in the head would make the job quick and accurate. 

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I was at Brake and Equipment Warehouse last time they said they had bought out another wheel cylinder/brake lining shop, I think it was New York? 1980's?, he said they had all kinds of special fixturing and equipment for almost every pre WW2 car including European.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As far as speculating how a cylinder is jigged up for boring, it's funny ,know matter how ,even another experienced machinest thinks is done,that is never the case.

  As far a very basic crude jigging .one can use a tight fitting or adjustable  mandral(bar/pipe/rod) run through the bore as it is ,place the other end of the mandral in a Bridgport and lock up the cylinder on the table with what ever there is..Remove the mandral and start hacking away with what ever cutter..?Crude, but you get the idea..This is not how it's done.Ha!

 

 The web side shows a picture of a corner with a lathe and tool bits and such which is just a scant of the what they use or need.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 3/16/2022 at 7:34 PM, greenie said:

For what it’s worth, I was at White Post about 2 years ago and there were several men there, most my age (middle age plus) hard at work on machines that outdated them all. I wouldn’t hesitate to send work to them.

I was there yesterday, and will be again next week!  I'll see if I can get a picture of how they hold the cylinders. 

 

I'm putting a top on a 1918 Kline Car touring, a car which Tim Crowder did work on for years and is now being "prettied up" for the Virginia Museum of History and Culture in Richmond.....

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Before I originally went with Apple mostly because they were close (and now regret)  almost 2 years ago..I called White Post,and was so turned off by the guy on the phone,like I was bothering him for me to inquire on current price and speed of completion,(couple that with a major negitive rep..for a while in the past ),I passed on them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...