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History - Before there was Buick


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The atached photo is of Walter Marr and his partner J.P. Schneider demonstrating their Marr runabout as reported in the March, 1903 issue of the Cycle and Automobile Trade Journal. It's a rear-mounted single-cylinder of 6.5hp. You will notice the steering wheel, more advanced than Marr/Buick earlier cars which had tiller steering at that time.

Those familiar with Buick history know that David Buick RE-incorporated the Buick Co. in May of 1903 and RE-hired Walter Marr as Chief Engineer sometime. That probably ended Marr's own experiments with this car and re-invigorated Buick's first successful car.

I have not seen this photo in distribution before, enjoy!

Marr-March-1903-Auto Trade Journal.jpg

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3 hours ago, alextheantiqueautoguy said:

The atached photo is of Walter Marr and his partner J.P. Schneider demonstrating their Marr runabout as reported in the March, 1903 issue of the Cycle and Automobile Trade Journal. It's a rear-mounted single-cylinder of 6.5hp. You will notice the steering wheel, more advanced than Marr/Buick earlier cars which had tiller steering at that time.

Those familiar with Buick history know that David Buick RE-incorporated the Buick Co. in May of 1903 and RE-hired Walter Marr as Chief Engineer sometime. That probably ended Marr's own experiments with this car and re-invigorated Buick's first successful car.

I have not seen this photo in distribution before, enjoy!

Marr-March-1903-Auto Trade Journal.jpg

 

Engine I do not believe is rear mounted. The flywheel is right under the seat in the center of the car.  This is the same layout of the early 2 cylinder Buicks including the model F & G's. 

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The early 2 cylinder cars had the push rods on the bottom of the engine.  Problem with that is they would hit something in the road and the engine would lose the push rods and many times part of the valve train.  In later models the push rods were moved to the top of the engine to protect them  I think about 1906, but not sure of exact year.  My1908 has the push rods on the top of the engine.

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On 3/12/2022 at 9:37 PM, Larry Schramm said:

The early 2 cylinder cars had the push rods on the bottom of the engine.  Problem with that is they would hit something in the road and the engine would lose the push rods and many times part of the valve train.  In later models the push rods were moved to the top of the engine to protect them  I think about 1906, but not sure of exact year.  My1908 has the push rods on the top of the engine.

 

That's Buick. The Marr Autocar had a 1 cylinder engine and no push rods.

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