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1918 Pierce-Arrow Lumber Truck at Auction - East Moline IL


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Don't see these too often...Top Speed 14 MPH...Goes the weekend of the Mar 24th...

 

HIGHLIGHTS

  • 1918 Pierce-Arrow Model X-4 2-Ton Lumber Truck
  • A complete and correct example of an early Pierce-Arrow truck
  • One of the highest quality trucks of the era
  • This is one of the most intricate trucks in the collection and built at the time
  • One of the most unique engines: 276 CI 4-cylinder T-Head engine
  • 4-speed transmission
  • Worm-drive rear axle; one of the first companies to use this innovation
  • Flatbed body
  • Wood-spoke wheels
  • Solid-rubber tires
  • Originally used to haul lumber to Fresno, California from a sawmill near Sequoia Park
  • Top speed of 14 MPH
  • The Pierce-Arrow name lives on in fire trucks made by Pierce Manufacturing Inc. of Appleton, Wisconsin
  • From the Hays Antique Truck Museum
  • Sold with lot K15.1, 1918 Ralston 2-Ton lumber trailer

Description from the Hays' Museum Vehicle Plaque:

The 1918 Pierce-Arrow is one of the best restorations in the museum and is probably the most valuable truck here. It has a flatbed body with rollers and was originally used to haul lumber to Fresno, California from a sawmill near Sequoia Park. Pierce-Arrow was one of the highest quality trucks on the market, ranking with Packard, Locomobile, Alco, and Kelly-Springfield. Pierce-Arrow Motor Car Co. of Buffalo, New York began making trucks in 1910. In 1911, the company was one of the first to use a worm-drive rear axle instead of the usual chain drive. In 1928, Pierce-Arrow merged with Studebaker. The last new Pierce-Arrow designed model in 1932 used a dual-ignition straight-eight engine and had a top speed of 55 MPH, a remarkable speed for the time. In 1932 Studebaker Pierce-Arrow merged with the White Motor Co. of Cleveland, Ohio, which already controlled Indiana trucks. The assembly of Pierce-Arrow and Indiana trucks was moved to Cleveland where White made the last true Pierce-Arrow trucks in 1932 and 1933. (Studebaker made a so-called Studebaker Pierce-Arrow Panther for export in 1934.) At the end of 1933, the Pierce-Arrow company became independent again and continued with automobile production until 1938. In 1935 the Seagrave Corporation of Columbus, Ohio, bought the rights to Pierce-Arrow eight cylinder and V12 engines and used them for its fire engines until 1970. Today the Pierce-Arrow name lives on in fire trucks made by Pierce Manufacturing Inc. of Appleton, Wisconsin.

 

https://www.mecum.com/lots/GA0322-496969/1918-pierce-arrow-model-x-4-2-ton-lumber-truck/

 

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