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1935 Oldsmobile L35 convertible F/S in Ontario NOT MINE $36,500 CDN DOLLARS


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10 minutes ago, TAKerry said:

That car may have been painted 50 yrs ago. Beautiful car but def in need of paint, add another 30k.

30K for a paint job ....Wow ...Than you would be afraid to drive it .if there is no rust i would suppose about 8-12 K and take it back on the street otherwise it will be a trailer queen .

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27 minutes ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

Wonder if it could be partially painted by a good shop.  If you could do that and any sorting for a few grand it would be a great and unusual driver.

Looks like some repainting has already been done. Agree a partial repaint would, at minimum, be a good short term fix.

Good asking price for a sharp 8 cylinder convertible coupe.

Edited by suchan
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2 hours ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

Wonder if it could be partially painted by a good shop

 

I agree with those who say a very pricey paintjob  (total restore) would make it too nice to ever really enjoy.

 

We seem to forget that back in 1940 when a low value 5 year old used car had the typical dead factory (short-lived) paint, any body shop in any town would never take a car totally apart for "new paint".

 

Heck, you probably could not find a paint shop back then that would be willing to tie up their shop to take a car all apart for just new paint.  They were making plenty of money by just doing  basic "repaints" that looked great to most customers. 

 

Some people today would be totally fine with that type of work if they just want a nice old convertible to pleasure drive, but it's frowned on if you took to certain car shows. 

 

Too many cars like this super rare one get torn apart with good intentions but never get finished due to failed checkbooks or loss of interest.   I cringe when people say a car is so rare that it "deserves" a high end restoration.  All I then think of is trailer-queen that never gets to go for a true pleasure ride.  This is a fantastic looking car (even as is), I hope it finds a good home.

 

 

 

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10 hours ago, Hudsy Wudsy said:

Once again, poor surface preparation yields heartbreaking results. This is far too nice a car to have a failed paint job. The price is $28,470 USD.

 

I wonder if it was surface prep or just failure of materials.  I have literally done spot work on peoples cars in the driveway on a nice day,  usually cleaning up some rust and that darn repair (on their vehicle) done haphazardly and driven in the winter for many years later,  never fails.  I do my own paint work on my own cars,  starting with freshly blasted metal, sometimes the best materials ,  and the darn thing fails in my heated shop within a few years,  having never even been exposed to rain.  I take paint work now as a complete roll of the dice. I've seen 50 or more year old lacquer resprays done in a local body shop without a ton of prep work and they still look great. I've seen what looks like professional restorations,  fail in 10-20.    I like buying cars with 30-40 year old paint that isn't flaking or cracking,  then you know it's going to stay put.  Usually a wet sand and buff and they look almost new. 

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58 minutes ago, Hudsy Wudsy said:

A S, you may well be right. I'm probably not qualified to judge. I just assume that failed paint jobs are always the fault of poor preparation.

Or maybe just old age? Sometimes the metal outlasts the paint. Not usually the case up here in Canada but every once in awhile.

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3 hours ago, Ed Luddy said:

Or maybe just old age? Sometimes the metal outlasts the paint. Not usually the case up here in Canada but every once in awhile.

That might be the case some of the time, but what I see is simply paint missing on flat surfaces. I guess that I think it looks like poor surface preparation, but as I said before, I'm not all that qualified to say. I have to laugh, I've done so much body work and painting over the years, but it was always to the end of getting some junker ready to sell. I rarely got to see my work a year or so later. Lest that sound too cynical, I'll add that Minnesotans are pretty realistic about rust and I've never represented any of my cars as being from out of state or in better shape than they were. It's just that people like to see an old beater shine enough not to be an embarrassment to them. A lot of the cars that I used to "jockey" sold for a few hundred, not a few thousand.

Edited by Hudsy Wudsy (see edit history)
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I prepped and painted my Lincoln in 2000. I thought I was pretty thorough and careful. I recently have some bubbling on the hood - the paint is lifting off the primer. So I guess I wasn’t careful enough.
 

Some of the skim coat product I used on the trunk lid has shrunk a little and you can see it in the right light. But 20+ years and 10s of thousands of miles have left scratches and dings anyway. I will probably repaint the hood but leave the rest. In its current condition I have no qualms about driving it whenever and wherever I want, or leaving it in a parking lot. 
 

Back to the subject at hand, this Olds is a cool car. I’ve always wanted an early thirties car but I really like this one. I am no paint expert, but the flaking down to bare metal tells me it is indeed a prep problem. 

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3 hours ago, Hudsy Wudsy said:

That might be the case some of the time, but what I see is simply paint missing on flat surfaces. I guess that I think it looks like poor surface preparation, but as I said before, I'm not all that qualified to say. I have to laugh, I've done so much body work and painting over the years, but it was always to the end of getting some junker ready to sell. I rarely got to see my work a year or so later. Lest that sound too cynical, I'll add that Minnesotans are pretty realistic about rust and I've never represented any of my cars as being from out of state or in better shape than they were. It's just that people like to see an old beater shine enough not to be an embarrassment to them. A lot of the cars that I used to "jockey" sold for a few hundred, not a few thousand.

Yes! I was told time and time again when I was younger and working the used car business part time," shiny paint outsells new tires and brakes 10 to 1"

 That was when I prepped, dechromed, sanded and masked and taped.  They were right. Every Corvette, Camaro etc that needed paint got a fresh coat of "ReSale Red".

    But anytime I found an original paint, no hit car I would try to buy or call my knowledgeable friends to come get it.

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49 minutes ago, alsancle said:

Is this the eight or the six?

 

Description

Such a beautiful old car. Have owned it for 22 years. Big straight 8 in her, very nice interior, runs and drives excellent. No issues at all. Suicide doors are solid, very clean underneath, rumble seat in great condition. This is a very nice car with incredible lines and stance. The paint is peeling and should have a repaint. No rust anywhere and metal is in excellent condition, this is a California car. Registered in Ontario. Thanks for looking.

 

^^^ Copied from the ad link.  The windshield framing design looks exactly like a 35 LaSalle conv, which was a total new W/S design for 1935 LaS, and first LaS with a Fisher body instead of Fleetwood.  Perhaps the Olds 8 conv body is slightly smaller, IDK

 

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